Dusti R Jones

Dusti R Jones
University of Utah Health

Doctor of Philosophy

About

19
Publications
2,170
Reads
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149
Citations
Citations since 2017
17 Research Items
147 Citations
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Introduction
My research examines the dynamic interplay between stress and affect (emotion/mood) to better understand ways to facilitate resilience against the development of chronic disease. Towards this end, I examine links between emotions and emotion dynamics with stress-relevant biomarkers (e.g., inflammatory and cortisol fluctuations) and health behaviors (e.g., tobacco use, alcohol use, sleep). My work uses mobile health technologies to understand how these processes unfold in everyday life.
Additional affiliations
June 2020 - present
Pennsylvania State University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
August 2015 - May 2020
Pennsylvania State University
Field of study
  • Biobehavioral Health
August 2012 - June 2015
Western Washington University
Field of study
  • Experimental Psychology
August 2010 - June 2012
Western Washington University
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Introduction: Individuals with greater affect variability (i.e., moment-to-moment fluctuations possibly reflecting emotional dysregulation) are at risk for greater systemic inflammation, which is associated with cardiovascular disease. Some evidence suggests that affect variability is linked with poorer health indicators only among those with high...
Article
Full-text available
Conceptualizing physical pain and negative affect as potentially interactive, we hypothesized that higher levels of peripheral inflammatory markers would be observed consistently only among individuals with both higher negative affect and pain symptomatology. Participants were generally healthy midlife adults from the Bronx, NY (N = 212, Mage = 46....
Article
Evidence is mixed with regard to whether positively valanced affect (PA) is associated with engagement in health behaviors. Both affective arousal (activated/ deactivated) and level of analysis (between and within-person) may influence such associations. Adults (N = 121; 25-65 years) completed ambulatory assessments of affect and daily reports of s...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: Intensive ambulatory assessment, such as ecological momentary assessment (EMA), is increasingly used to capture naturalistic patient-reported outcomes. EMA design features (eg, study duration, prompt frequency) vary widely between studies, but it is not known if such design decisions influence potential subjects' willingness to particip...
Article
Background Research pairing ecological momentary assessment (EMA) methodology and ambulatory cortisol during daily life is still rare, as is careful testing of the within-person associations between stress, affect, and cortisol. Using a circumplex approach, we considered both valence and arousal components of affect. Purpose To examine the within-...
Article
Ostracism is associated with poor outcomes, but it is unclear if online versus in-person ostracism elicits divergent psychological and physiological responses. Participants (N = 54) were randomly assigned to online or in-person ostracism, and provided pre- and post-ostracism measures of affect, self-esteem, self-feelings, and salivary cortisol. No...
Article
Background: Previous research suggests that positive affect (PA) may promote health and longevity and that one potential mechanism involves inflammation. However, it remains unclear to what extent PA is associated with specific inflammatory markers and whether such associations are driven by main effects of PA and/or due to PA operating as a stress...
Article
Objective Little is known about whether level of affective arousal (i.e., high vs. low) is associated with alcohol use and whether this relationship differs by valence (i.e., positive vs. negative affect) among adults. Methods. Participants were n=93 self-reported current drinkers (ages 25-65) who reported positive (PA) and negative affect (NA) sev...
Article
Objective: Higher affect variability (the extent to which individuals vary in their affect over time) has been associated with poorer health indicators, but associations with inflammation are less well understood. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether affect variability was associated with inflammation in ways consistent with the...
Poster
Full-text available
BACKGROUND o The trait extraversion is associated with positive affect and social characteristics (gregariousness, assertiveness) o These characteristics manifest in daily life as affective states, behaviors, cognitions, and desires that interact with environmental characteristics 1-3 o Lower extraversion (colloquially "introversion") is associated...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Emerging evidence suggests that higher circulating levels of inflammatory biomarkers in blood are associated with higher negative affect (NA) and lower positive affect (PA). To our knowledge, the unique associations between NA and PA in daily life and salivary biomarkers of inflammation have not been examined. This study examined these...
Article
Full-text available
Background and objectives: Mindfulness meditation (MM) training promotes health and well-being. One potential mechanistic link between MM and health may be coping flexibility, (e.g., the ability to monitor and modify coping strategies based on situational needs and strategy effectiveness). We hypothesized that MM training would increase coping flex...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Emotion variability (the extent to which individuals vary in emotional states over time) has been associated with poorer health indicators (e.g., dysregulated diurnal cortisol) but its associations with inflammation are unknown. In a diverse sample of participants (N=231; aged 25–65; 65% female; 62% Black; 25% Hispanic) we examined if positive emot...
Article
Objectives: This study identified daily associations between sleep, emotion, and marital functioning in the context of chronic pain. Because spouses' sleep is compromised on nights when patients experience more pain, we set out to identify implications of spouses' sleep for their own emotion (anger) upon waking and marital interaction (marital ten...
Article
Very little research has assessed how measures of negative and positive affect (NA and PA) derived from assessments at multiple time points per day (e.g., via ecological momentary assessment [EMA]), as opposed to questionnaires that rely on recall over a longer period, are related to levels of peripheral inflammation. We examined how different indi...
Article
Background Research examining the effects of mindfulness meditation (MM) on emotion seldom considers differences by arousal level or emotion variability. Methods In the present study, 115 participants (64% Female, 72% White, Mage = 19.03) were randomly assigned to a brief MM intervention condition (n = 60) or a wait‐list control condition (n = 51)...
Article
Background Perceived growth (PG) refers to perceptions of positive changes that unfold over time after experiencing trauma. Higher PG is often associated with positive long‐term health, but the processes through which PG may influence health are unclear. The present study examines two potential pathways among individuals living with asthma or RA: (...
Article
Repeated experiences with stress and negative emotion (NE) can decrease psychological and physical well-being. Ruminating on stressful events can further prolong NE responses, especially for those who are pessimistic. For three days participants (N = 68) reported hourly on their current stress, rumination, perceived control, and NE. Tests of mediat...
Article
Stress and health researchers often utilize standardized laboratory stress tasks to evaluate the physical and psychological consequences of challenging experiences. These laboratory sessions usually include multiple measurements of physical and psychological responses collected over time. Multilevel modeling allows researchers to make use of all av...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I am factor analyzing a data set where 40+ items have loaded on a factor. The items make sense, none are correlated above .8, all load on the factor at .6 or above, and do not cross-load higher than .3 on any other factor.
I need to reduce the number of items, and want to retain the fewest number of items possible to maintain a Cronbach's alpha of at least .85. I need code to select all possible combinations of n items (with n ranging from 3-20 items), calculate Cronbach's alpha for each, and output the reliability for all combinations of items so that we can determine whether there is an optimal number of items and whether specific combinations of items are most ideal.
Does anyone know how to do this or something similar?

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