Dumas Gálvez

Dumas Gálvez
Universidad de Panamá · Programa Centroamericano de maestría en Entomología

PhD

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26
Publications
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191
Citations

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Vertical stratification of animal assemblages has been observed in several arthropod taxa. However, for some groups there is conflicting evidence, such as for the neotropical orchid bees. Here, we used a meta-analysis to evaluate trends in abundance and diversity of euglossine bees across strata. We found no evidence of stratification in terms of d...
Article
Predators exert negative effects on prey, besides the act of killing, generating behavioral and physiological costs, a concept known as the ecology of fear. Studies in scatter-hoarding rodents in temperate zones suggests that prey use habitat structure to perceive predation risk. Less is known about how tropical forest rodents perceive predation ri...
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We report the occurrence of Brachyplatys subaeneus (Westwood, 1837) on a new host plant species: the leguminose Macroptilium longepedunculatum. We discovered the bugs in the mouth of the river San Juan in Coiba National Park in Panama. We present the morphological and barcode species level identification. This insect pest normally attacks plants of...
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Fungi in the genus Escovopsis (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) are prevalent associates of the complex symbiosis between fungus-growing ants (Tribe Attini), the ants’ cultivated basidiomycete fungi and a consortium of both beneficial and harmful microbes found within the ants’ garden communities. Some Escovopsis spp. have been shown to attack the ants’ cu...
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en Roadkill monitoring can provide important information about spatial and temporal trends on roadkill events. These studies are important for conservation, but there are few examples from Central America. Here, I identified in a road near a national park in Panama that monthly vertebrate roadkill events decreased with increases in temperature and...
Article
The article was published with a typographical error to the name Álvaro Vega-Hidalgo.
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Full-text available
We measured abundance, diversity, and richness of Euglossa bees (Euglossini, Apidae) in lowland semi-deciduous forest in Darién National Park, Panamá, during the wet and dry seasons in the canopy and understory for five consecutive years (2013 to 2017) using McPhail traps baited with eucalyptus oil. We found a precipitous decline in abundance and r...
Data
Figure S1. Relative abundance of each species (represented by different colors) for each collection. Canopy collections are shown in the top row, and understory collections in the bottom row. The x-axis shows the collection date.
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Full-text available
Empirical evidence of immune priming in arthropods keeps growing, both at the within-and trans-generational level. The evidence comes mostly from work on insects and it remains unclear for some other arthropods whether exposure to a non-lethal dose of a pathogen provides protection during a second exposure with a lethal dose. A poorly investigated...
Article
The omnipresence of pathogens makes them a strong selective pressure for most organisms, generating a variety of defensive responses to fight them. One mechanism by which organisms can release this pressure is avoidance of the pathogens in a spatial or temporal context. To date, only a few biological systems provide evidence that habitat selection...
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A striking feature of most scorpion species is fluorescence under ultraviolet light, but few studies have investigated the adaptive benefit of this trait. A hypothesis is that fluorescence may lure prey towards the scorpion improving foraging success. In this study, we investigated whether the fluorescence of the scorpion Centruroides granosus Thor...
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Parasites and their hosts use different strategies to overcome the defenses of the other, often resulting in an evolutionary arms race. Limited animal studies have explored the differential responses of hosts when challenged by differential parasite loads and different developmental stages of a parasite. The fungus-growing ant Trachymyrmex sp. 10 e...
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This work discusses the criteria proposed to consider wild bees as bioindicators, and specifically applied to orchid bees in neotropical forests. Some of the issues are: 1) the deficiencies of the sampling methods, which makes it difficult to accurately assess species inventories. 2) missing knowledge about the biology of many species. 3) spatial o...
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Spiders show a repertoire of strategies to increase their foraging success. In particular, some orb-weaver spiders use attractive body colorations to lure prey. Interestingly, coloration varies with age in many species, which may result in ontogenetic variation of foraging success. By using feld observations, laboratory experiments and spectrophoto...
Article
The view that orb webs are imperceptible traps has changed since it was discovered that some spiders possess body colorations or web designs that are attractive to prey. Spiders of the genera Argiope and Nephila exemplify both cases and are able to adjust their webs to increase foraging success. In this study, I compared the foraging strategies of...
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Growing empirical evidence indicates that invertebrates become more resistant to a pathogen following initial exposure to a nonlethal dose; yet the generality, mechanisms, and adaptive value of such immune priming are still under debate. Because life-history theory predicts that immune priming and large investment in immunity should be more frequen...
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The function of silk web decorations in orb weaving spiders has been debated for decades. The most accepted hypothesized functions are that web decorations 1) provide camouflage against predators, 2) are an advertisement for vertebrates to avoid web damage, or 3) increase the attraction of prey to the web. Most studies have focused on only a few ge...
Article
Vertebrates show different tendencies in regard to their preference for seeds or fruits infested by insects compared to non-infested ones. Behaviour may include rejection of one type, preferential consumption of one type or no differentiation among them. When comparing infested versus non-infested fruits, most studies have focused on energy content...
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Optimal cache spacing theory predicts that scatter-hoarding animals store food at a density that balances the gains of reducing cache robbery against the costs of spacing out caches further. We tested the key prediction that cache robbery and cache spacing increase with the economic value of food: the ratio of food to consumer abundance. We quantif...
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There is controversy about the function of silk stabilimenta, also called silk decorations, on spiders' webs. Most of the proposed hypotheses have been tested using indirect methods. Protection against predators, advertisement for vertebrates to avoid web damage, and increasing prey attraction are the most popular hypotheses. In this study, I teste...
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Full-text available
Frugivorous and granivorous vertebrates often discriminate against seeds and fruits infested by insects (Sallabanks & Courtney 1992). Insects may actively render seed or fruit unpalatable or unusable to vertebrates as a strategy to maximize the amount of food available to themselves (Janzen 1977). Nevertheless, vertebrates sometimes do not differen...

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