Drummond Rennie

Drummond Rennie
University of California, San Francisco | UCSF

About

299
Publications
48,599
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101,307
Citations
Citations since 2016
9 Research Items
59055 Citations
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201620172018201920202021202202,0004,0006,0008,00010,00012,000
Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (299)
Article
Full-text available
Roach, Robert C., Peter H. Hackett, Oswald Oelz, Peter Bärtsch, Andrew M. Luks, Martin J. MacInnis, J. Kenneth Baillie, and The Lake Louise AMS Score Consensus Committee. The 2018 Lake Louise Acute Mountain Sickness Score. High Alt Med Biol 00:000-000, 2018.- The Lake Louise Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS) scoring system has been a useful research to...
Article
Full-text available
Thirty years on from the first congress on peer review, Drummond Rennie reflects on the improvements brought about by research into the process — and calls for more.
Technical Report
Full-text available
Proceso asistencial para la prevención de fracturas por fragilidad
Method
Proceso Asistencial Integrado para la prevención de fracturas por fragilidad.
Article
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Incomplete reporting has been identified as a major source of avoidable waste in biomedical research. Essential information is often not provided in study reports, impeding the identification, critical appraisal, and replication of studies. To improve the quality of reporting of diagnostic accuracy studies, the Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic...
Article
Full-text available
Incomplete reporting has been identified as a major source of avoidable waste in biomedical research. Essential information is often not provided in study reports, impeding the identification, critical appraisal, and replication of studies. To improve the quality of reporting of diagnostic accuracy studies, the Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic...
Article
Surprises keep occurring. While the process whereby editors actually make their decisions remains almost as mysterious as at the start, the huge advances in the electronic world have made peer review less expensive, quicker, and more efficient and have brought forth important but competing advances and threats to the validity of scientific publicat...
Article
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The CONSORT statement is used worldwide to improve the reporting of randomised controlled trials. Kenneth Schulz and colleagues describe the latest version, CONSORT 2010, which updates the reporting guideline based on new methodological evidence and accumulating experience Introduction Randomised controlled trials, when appropriately designed, cond...
Chapter
The purpose of clinical trials of interventions is to obtain unbiased, relevant, and reliable information on the value of the interventions. Many ethical problems can occur during a trial. It is particularly useful to look at the history and present situation of scientific misconduct in the United States to see how this came about, because it was i...
Article
In this issue of JAMA, Malički and colleagues¹ report their findings from an analysis of the 614 abstracts presented at the 7 congresses held from 1989 through 2013. Of these abstracts, overall, 76% were observational studies, 16% were studies of interventions aimed at improving peer review and scientific reporting, and 8% were opinion papers. At t...
Article
The phrase evidence-based medicine (EBM) was coined by Gordon Guyatt1 and then appeared in an article in The Rational Clinical Examination series in JAMA in 1992,2 but the roots of EBM go much further back. The personal stories of the origins of EBM were recently explored in a filmed oral history of some of the individuals most strongly associated...
Article
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Systematic reviews should build on a protocol that describes the rationale, hypothesis, and planned methods of the review; few reviews report whether a protocol exists. Detailed, well-described protocols can facilitate the understanding and appraisal of the review methods, as well as the detection of modifications to methods and selective reporting...
Article
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The protocol of a clinical trial serves as the foundation for study planning, conduct, reporting, and appraisal. However, trial protocols and existing protocol guidelines vary greatly in content and quality. This article describes the systematic development and scope of SPIRIT (Standard Protocol Items:Recommendations for Interventional Trials) 2013...
Article
The original purpose of registries of clinical trials was to reveal the existence of all trials, published or not, to investigators and systematic reviewers. Trials left unpublished because results were unfavorable to their sponsors, or simply because investigators never submitted them to journals for publication, could then be discovered, the tria...
Article
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Call for research The primary aims of biomedical peer review are to select and improve research and other academic work for funding and publication by identifying and reducing bias and increasing the validity, quality, credibility, and worth of scientific reports. This remains a difficult balance.1 Widespread advances in technology and communicati...
Article
This essay is in honor of Harold S. Luft, who, while heading up the Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies, publishing important empirical and theoretical papers, and at the same time mentoring me, managed to perform his task as Senior Associate Editor and then Co-Editor-in-Chief of Health Services Research with distinction. No one could...
Article
At the beginning of the 1990s, Antman and a team led by Tom Chalmers and Fred Mosteller used retrospective cumulative meta-analysis to show that the treatment recommendations of authorities in review articles and textbook chapters published over the previous 30 years had not reflected the best contemporary research evidence. These gaps between evid...
Article
Based on several factors, the current general health of the United States is considerably less than optimal. The nation remains involved in a protracted war in Iraq, which has been costly in terms of financial expenditures, but even much more importantly, in the thousands of lives lost and many more individuals severely injured. Numerous regions of...
Article
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Why would a drug company go to the expense and bother of conducting a trial involving hundreds of practitioners—each recruiting a few patients—when a study based at a few large medical centers could accomplish the same scientific purposes much more efficiently? The main point of the seeding trial is not to get high-quality scientific information: I...
Article
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The Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy (STARD) statement provided guidelines for investigators conducting diagnostic accuracy studies. We reviewed each item in the statement for its applicability to clinical examination diagnostic accuracy research, viewing each discrete aspect of the history and physical examination as a diagnostic tes...
Article
A 232-year-old “patient”1 has been experiencing acute and chronic systemic health problems. Despite the concerted efforts of dedicated and superb physicians, the availability of state-of-the-art medical treatments and technological advances, and trillions of dollars in annual health care expenditures,2 major aspects of the health, well-being, and p...
Article
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To determine whether financial ties to one drug company are associated with favourable results or conclusions in meta-analyses on antihypertensive drugs. Retrospective cohort study. Meta-analyses published up to December 2004 that were not duplicates and evaluated the effects of antihypertensive drugs compared with any comparator on clinical end po...
Chapter
The purpose of clinical trials of interventions is to obtain unbiased, relevant, and reliable information on the value of the interventions. Many ethical problems can occur during a trial. It is particularly useful to look at the history and present situation of scientific misconduct in the United States to see how this came about, because it was i...
Article
Peer review, whether of manuscripts submitted for publication or of grant applications submitted for funding, is a central part of the scientific enterprise. Since the first announcement in 1986, we have held 5 Peer Review Congresses at 4-year intervals, and their success is demonstrated by the stimulus they provided to investigate the process wher...
Article
Along with these alarming trends in expenditures and health insurance coverage, there are several major problems at the clinical care delivery level in the US health care system. For instance, medical care has become increasingly fragmented, and patients are often left to navigate and negotiate through a bewildering and complex system. At the same...
Article
Full-text available
In an effort to identify previously unrecognized aspects of editorial decision-making, we explored the words and phrases that one group of editors used during their meetings. We performed an observational study of discussions at manuscript meetings at JAMA, a major US general medical journal. One of us (KD) attended 12 editorial meetings in 2003 as...
Article
Large long-term clinical trials have helped to define first-line drug therapies for conditions such as high blood pressure.1 Physician adherence to evidence-based guidelines, however, has been modest at best,2 and the causes remain unclear. In a study of antihypertensive drug use in 10 countries, Fretheim and Oxman3 characterized the international...
Article
The number of individuals in the United States who are unable to access medical care because they are underinsured or lack any insurance at all continues to increase. An estimated 61 million persons aged 19 to 64 years were uninsured or underinsured in 2003.1 The peculiarly US system of basing insurance on employment is collapsing in the face of bu...
Article
The scientific literature is a record of the search for truth. Publication of faked data diverts this search. The scientific community has a duty to warn people to ignore an article containing faked data and must try to prevent inadvertent citation of it. The scientific community accomplishes these tasks by publishing a retraction and linking it to...
Article
Letters Section Editor: Robert M. Golub, MD, Senior Editor.
Article
Physicians and patients expect that when medications are prescribed correctly for labeled indications and are used as directed, these medications generally will have beneficial effects and will not cause significant harm. This confidence in pharmaceutical products reflects trust in the effectiveness and integrity of the drug approval and monitoring...
Article
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In a recent article in JAMA on the registration of clinical trials,1 Dickersin and I pointed out that, 30 years after the idea of registering trials had been proposed, 18 years after registration of trials at inception had been shown to eliminate publication bias, and despite the presence of numerous trial registers large and small, Manheimer and A...
Article
Our aim was to improve the accuracy and completeness of reporting of studies of diagnostic accuracy in order to allow readers to assess the potential for bias in a study and to evaluate the generalizability of its results. The Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy (STARD) steering committee searched the literature to identify publications...
Article
Full-text available
To improve the accuracy and completeness of reporting of studies of diagnostic accuracy in order to allow readers to assess the potential for bias in a study and to evaluate the generalizability of its results. The Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy (STARD) steering committee searched the literature to identify publications on the appro...
Article
The quality of reporting of studies of diagnostic accuracy is less than optimal. Complete and accurate reporting is necessary to enable readers to assess the potential for bias in a study and to evaluate the generalisability of the results. A group of scientists and editors has developed the STARD (Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy) st...
Article
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That it is not possible to find information about all initiated clinical trials is of international concern. This is a particular worry because scientists tend to publish their positive findings more often than their negative findings (publication bias). A comprehensive register of initiated clinical trials, with each trial assigned a unique identi...
Article
To comprehend the results of diagnostic accuracy studies, readers must understand the design, conduct, and analysis of such studies. The authors sought to develop guidelines for improving the accuracy and completeness of reporting of studies of diagnostic accuracy in order to allow readers better to assess the validity and generalizability of study...
Article
N THIS ISSUE OF THE JOURNAL ,B LACK AND COLLEAGUES 1 reporttheresultsofanabortedclinicaltrial.IntheControlled Onset Verapamil Investigation of Cardiovascular End Points (CONVINCE) study, a large randomizeddouble-blindequivalencetrialwithmanystrengths,the investigators compared a controlled-onset extendedrelease formulation of the calcium channel bl...
Article
We have now held 4 Peer Review Congresses at 4-year intervals, and their success is demonstrated by the stimulus they have given to an evolving science—investigation of the process whereby scientific work is selected and published.1- 4 Since the announcement of the first Peer Review Congress in 1986, the numbers of abstracts submitted to successive...
Article
Full-text available
We have now held four peer review congresses at four year intervals, and their success is shown by the stimulus they have given to an evolving science—investigation of the process whereby scientific work is selected and published.1–4 Since the announcement of the first peer review congress in 1986, the numbers of abstracts submitted to successive c...
Article
The objective of the 'Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy' (STARD) initiative is to improve the reporting of studies of diagnostic accuracy, so as to allow readers to assess the potential for bias in a study and to evaluate the generalibility of its results. The group searched the literature to identify publications on the appropriate co...
Article
Full-text available
The quality of reporting of studies of diagnostic accuracy is less than optimal. Complete and accurate reporting is necessary to enable readers to assess the potential for bias in the study and to evaluate the generalizability of the results. A group of scientists and editors has developed the STARD (Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy)...
Article
To comprehend the results of diagnostic accuracy studies, readers must understand the design, conduct, analysis, and results of such studies. That goal can be achieved only through complete transparency from authors. To improve the accuracy and completeness of reporting of studies of diagnostic accuracy to allow readers to assess the potential for...
Article
Authors preparing reports for THE JOURNAL on the accuracy of diagnostic tests will notice a change in our Instructions for Authors.1 They will be referred to a checklist and flow diagram for a study of diagnostic accuracy on the JAMA Web site (http://www.jama.com) and to a statement about this checklist and flow diagram,2 as well as a background do...
Article
There is an easy, cheap, and responsible way to link credit for published papers with responsibility for their contents, and I am surprised that it was not mentioned in Donald Kennedy's otherwise excellent editorial on the Schon affair (“Next steps in the Schon affair,” 18 Oct., p. [495][1]).
Article
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In this issue of The Journal, we publish 26 of the papers presented at the Second International Congress on Peer Review in Biomedical Publication, held in Chicago, Ill, September 9-11, 1993. Of these 26 papers, two, those by Kassirer and Campion1 and Judson,2 were invited. The others were submitted in response to a concerted effort we have made dur...
Article
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To determine the prevalence of honorary and ghost authorship in Cochrane reviews, how authorship is assigned, and the ways in which authors and Cochrane editorial teams contribute. Using a Web-based, self-administered survey, corresponding authors for 577 reviews published in issues 1 and 2 from 1999 of The Cochrane Library were invited to report o...
Article
Studies with positive results are more likely to be published than studies with negative results (publication bias). One reason this occurs is that authors are less likely to submit manuscripts reporting negative results to journals. There is no evidence that publication bias occurs once manuscripts have been submitted to a medical journal. We asse...
Article
Studies have shown that reports from clinical trials with statistically significant results tend to be submitted and published more rapidly than reports from studies with null or insignificant findings. We wanted to determine whether manuscripts reporting positive results from controlled clinical trials are published more quickly than those reporti...
Article
To determine whether journals have improved their disclosure of ethical protections in clinical trials. Comparison of clinical trials published before and after 1997 (July 1995 to December 1996 and January 1998 to June 1999) in Annals of Internal Medicine, BMJ, JAMA, The Lancet, and The New England Journal of Medicine. Sixty articles per journal pe...
Article
Full-text available
High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is a potentially fatal condition that typically starts after ascent in people ascending too quickly. When first described, HAPE was assumed to be due to acute left ventricular failure, but it has been known for 40 years that HAPE is associated with an excessive hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and pulmonary hy...
Article
In April 1997, the Cochrane Collaboration implemented the Criticism Management System for The Cochrane Library, allowing readers to electronically submit criticisms on Cochrane reviews and protocols. As a result of resource constraints and user feedback, the Criticism Management System evolved through three different versions. Major problems have i...
Article
Numerous examples of irresponsible authorship are associated with the rise in the number of authors per article and with the documented rise in authorship disputes. Multiple co-investigators have become the norm, and a result is that old concepts of authorship-which, when there was but one author, automatically linked credit with accountability-hav...
Article
If physicians are to base treatment decisions on the evidence in the medical literature, all the relevant results of trials must be available easily and consistently. Yet it is common to have trouble identifying the hypothesis, the research question, and the design of a published trial. It is even more common to lose count of the participants or to...
Article
During a 3-day meeting at Bellagio in January 2001, a group of 20 editors from 12 countries in 5 continents met to map out a strategy for the World Association of Medical Editors (WAME)'s continued development in the service of medical editors over the next several years. The group: 1) Developed a statement of principles on the standards of profess...
Article
this article. Corresponding Author and Reprints: Donna F. Stroup, PhD, MSc, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Rd NE, Mail Stop C08, Atlanta, GA 30333 (e-mail: dfs2@cdc.gov)
Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law 26.2 (2001) 383-386 In this essay, I shall not attempt to deal with the many points raised in Peter D. Jacobson and Matthew L. Kanna's presentation. I shall merely note that they find cost-effectiveness analyses (CEAs) inevitable, unpopular both politically and with juries, and often unacceptable in produc...
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Despite federal regulations on faculty conflicts of interest in federally funded research, academic-industry ties are common, and evidence exists that financial considerations bias the research record. Public scrutiny of these ties is increasing, especially in cases where researchers have financial interests in the corporate sponsors of their clini...