Drew Constable

Drew Constable
Environment Agency UK · National Hydroecology Team

BA (Hons), MSc

About

12
Publications
9,948
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233
Citations
Citations since 2017
8 Research Items
171 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023010203040
2017201820192020202120222023010203040

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Full-text available
We report the discovery of a non-native gammarid, Gammarus fossarum (Koch, 1836) (Crustacea, Amphipoda), in UK rivers. Gammarus fossarum is a common freshwater gammarid in many parts of mainland Europe, but was previously considered absent from the UK. Gammarus fossarum was detected in a number of UK rivers following DNA metabarcoding of a mini-bar...
Article
Full-text available
Two Ponto-Caspian amphipods, Dikerogammarus villosus and Dikerogammarus haemobaphes, have expanded their geographical ranges from eastern Europe into Great Britain in recent years. This study represents one of the first examining the distribution and habitat preferences of coexisting populations of D. haemobaphes and D. villosus via field and labor...
Article
In rivers, the ecological effects of drought typically result in gradual adjustments of invertebrate community structure and functioning, punctuated by sudden changes as key habitats, such as wetted channel margins, become dewatered and dry. This paper outlines the development and application of a new index (Drought Effect of Habitat Loss on Invert...
Article
Full-text available
The impact of invasive gammaridean species on native biodiversity is well documented, but the potential for them to disrupt ecosystem functioning is less well understood. Native freshwater amphipods are considered to be archetypal leaf shredders and are considered key to leaf litter processing within rivers. It is possible that invasions may interf...
Article
Salinisation is a global threat to freshwater habitats and is predicted to worsen with climate change. Increases in salinity can result in substantial modification of freshwater biotic communities through both direct toxic effects and indirect effects such as altering prey resources, competitive interactions, predator abundances, and facilitating t...
Article
Full-text available
The increasing number of taxa being translocated across the globe is leading to many non-native species encountering indigenous taxa as well as other non-native species. Environmental heterogene-ity may strongly influence the spatial distribution, habitat use and refuge availability for these taxa. Using a series of 24-h mesocosm experiments we exa...
Article
Full-text available
An update and overview of the discovery or Gammarus fossarum within the UK. FBA News No. 74 pp. 11-12.
Technical Report
Full-text available
The recent arrival of Dikerogammarus villosus and haemobaphes within the UK has drawn extra attention to the identification of individuals belonging to the Gammaridae family. Their relatively new appearance has required freshwater taxonomists to become familiar in using identification guides that highlight important and distinguishing morphological...
Article
Full-text available
The Ponto-Caspian amphipod Dikerogammarus villosus was found both in the margins and open water areas of Grafham Water, a large reservoir in Cambridgeshire, U.K., in September 2010. Both adults and juveniles were present in large numbers and were most frequent in the boulder/cobble areas dominating the margins of the reservoir. Precopula pairs were...

Questions

Questions (3)
Question
From my novice R understanding, from using the R package 'gee' it appears that there is no option to select a negative binomial distribution for GEE. Are there other packages available that can do this and/or is there a relatively simple alternative way of computing/creating this?
Question
When undertaking some chironomid exuviae work on a lake choked with water soldier, some of their leaves were found with rows of some form of seeds growing through them (see attached photos). I know it might be difficult to establish exactly what it is, but their elegant positioning in rows caught the eye. Incidentally, I have also attached a photo showing the choked lake for context. I have previously asked a question about people's experience of removing it.
Thanks Drew.
Question
The lake is c.6.3 hectares and <1m deep. The lake has slightly elevated TP and TN concentrations and there is a concern that removing the invasive water soldier could cause a phase shift from a clear macrophyte dominated state to one that is turbid and phytoplankton dominated. Any comments or experiences about how to approach the issue are welcome. Also how realistic is it to fully remove water soldier so that it does not return?

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