Douglas Rosene

Douglas Rosene
Boston University | BU · Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology

PhD Psychology & Neurobiology

About

244
Publications
26,553
Reads
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13,259
Citations
Citations since 2017
73 Research Items
3925 Citations
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Introduction
The focus of my lab is on functions of the forebrain in general and cerebral cortex in particular in primates. Major functional interests are on higher cognitive functions of learning, memory and executive systems and on motor control systems. Most use the rhesus monkey or human brain as model systems. Current focus of cognitive studies is on the neurobiological substrates of age-related cognitive impairment and the role of inflammation in aging pathology and in recovery of fine motor funtion.
Additional affiliations
January 2008 - present
Drexel University
January 2008 - present
January 2007 - present

Publications

Publications (244)
Article
Full-text available
Background Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is common in older people and causes lacunar stroke and vascular cognitive impairment. Risk factors include old age, hypertension and variants in the genes COL4A1/COL4A2 encoding collagen alpha-1(IV) and alpha-2(IV), here termed collagen-IV, which are core components of the basement membrane. We tested...
Article
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Postmortem studies are currently considered a gold standard for investigating brain structure at the cellular level. To investigate cellular changes in the context of human development, aging, or disease treatment, non-invasive in-vivo imaging methods such as diffusion MRI (dMRI) are needed. However, dMRI measures are only indirect measures and req...
Article
Age-associated cognitive decline is common among otherwise healthy elderly people, even in the absence of Alzheimer's disease and neuron loss. Instead, white matter loss and myelin damage are strongly associated with cognitive decline. Myelin is subject to lifelong oxidative stress that damages the myelin sheath, which is repaired by cells of the o...
Article
Full-text available
Reorganization of motor circuits in the cortex and corticospinal tract are thought to underlie functional recovery after cortical injury, but the mechanisms of neural plasticity that could be therapeutic targets remain unclear. Recent work from our group have shown that systemic treatment with mesenchymal stem cell derived (MSCd) extracellular vesi...
Article
Full-text available
In all mammals, the superior olivary complex (SOC) comprises a group of auditory brainstem nuclei that are important for sound localization. Its principal nuclei, the lateral superior olive (LSO) and the medial superior olive (MSO) process interaural time and intensity differences, which are the main cues for sound localization in the horizontal pl...
Article
Cetacean behavior and life history imply a role for somatosensory detection of critical signals unique to their marine environment. As the sensory anatomy of cetacean glabrous skin has not been fully explored, skin biopsy samples of the flank skin of humpback whales were prepared for general histological and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses of in...
Article
Full-text available
Age-related impairments in cognitive function occur in multiple animal species including humans and nonhuman primates. Humans and rhesus monkeys exhibit a similar pattern of cognitive decline beginning in middle age, particularly within the domain of executive function. The prefrontal cortex is the brain region most closely associated with mediatin...
Article
The laminar cellular and circuit mechanisms by which the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) exerts flexible control of motor and affective information for goal-directed behavior have not been elucidated. Using multimodal tract-tracing, in vitro patch-clamp recording and computational approaches in rhesus monkeys (M. mulatta), we provide evidence that...
Article
Prenatal protein malnutrition (PPM) alters the developing brain including changes in monoaminergic systems and attention. In the present study, we used in vivo microdialysis to examine the relationship between PPM, acute stress, and extracellular serotonin (5HT), dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) in both hemispheres of lateral orbital frontal c...
Article
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Background: Stroke disproportionately affects men and women, with women over 65 years experiencing increased severity of impairment and higher mortality rates than men. Human studies have explored risk factors that contribute to these differences, but additional research is needed to investigate how sex differences affect functional recovery and h...
Article
Injury of oligodendrocytes (OLs) induces demyelination, and patients with neurodegenerative diseases exhibit demyelination concomitantly with neurological deficit and cognitive impairment. Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) are present in the adult central nervous system (CNS), and they can proliferate, differentiate, and remyelinate axons aft...
Article
The goal of this study was to investigate whether alterations in cerebral microvasculature, as measured by cerebral blood volume (CBV), contribute to age- and hypertension-related impairments in cognitive function with a focus on executive function and memory. Data were collected on 19 male rhesus monkeys ranging from 6.4 to 21.6 years of age. Hype...
Article
Full-text available
Investigations of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) brain have shed light on the function and organization of the primate brain at a scale and resolution not yet possible in humans. A cornerstone of the linkage between non-human primate and human studies of the brain is magnetic resonance imaging, which allows for an association to be made between...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: Stroke disproportionately affects men and women, with women over 65 experiencing increased severity of impairment and higher mortality rates than men. Human studies have explored risk factors that contribute to these differences, but additional research is needed to investigate how sex differences affect functional recovery and hence th...
Article
Single-cell analysis of CNS interactions Despite their importance in the physiology and pathology of the central nervous system (CNS), few methods are available for the unbiased, systematic investigation of cell-to-cell interactions at single-cell resolution. Clark et al. developed RABID-seq, a method that combines barcoded viral tracing with singl...
Article
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Significance: Myelin breakdown is likely a key factor in the loss of cognitive and motor function associated with many neurodegenerative diseases. Aim: New methods for imaging myelin structure are needed to characterize and quantify the degradation of myelin in standard whole-brain sections of nonhuman primates and in human brain. Approach: Quantit...
Article
Curcumin is a primary component of the spice turmeric, and is a potent anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant compound. In rodent models of brain damage from stroke or trauma, curcumin acts primarily on microglia and astrocytes to inhibit pro-inflammatory signaling pathways and to reduce inflammation and levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Further...
Article
Purpose Recent observations of several preferred orientations of diffusion in deep white matter may indicate either (a) that axons in different directions are independently bundled in thick sheets and function noninteractively, or more interestingly, (b) that the axons are closely interwoven and would exhibit branching and sharp turns. This study a...
Article
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Astrocytes are glial cells that are abundant in the central nervous system (CNS) and that have important homeostatic and disease-promoting functions1. However, little is known about the homeostatic anti-inflammatory activities of astrocytes and their regulation. Here, using high-throughput flow cytometry screening, single-cell RNA sequencing and CR...
Article
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Normal aging is characterized by declines in processing speed, learning, memory, and executive function even in the absence of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's Disease (AD). In normal aging monkeys and humans, neuronal loss does not account for cognitive impairment. Instead, loss of white matter volume and an accumulation of myelin sh...
Article
A high-quality rhesus macaque genome Genome technology has improved substantially since the first full organismal genomes were generated. Applying new technology, Warren et al. refined the genome of the rhesus macaque, a model nonhuman primate. Long-read technology and other recent advances in sequencing technology were applied to generate a genome...
Article
Full-text available
There is increasing evidence that the maternal environment exerts enduring influences on the fetal brain. In response to certain environmental stimuli such as reduced protein content, the fetus changes the course of its brain development, which leads to specific and programed changes in brain anatomy and physiology. These alterations produce a brai...
Article
Cortical injury, such as stroke, causes neurotoxic cascades that lead to rapid death and/or damage to neurons and glia. Axonal and myelin damage in particular, are critical factors that lead to neuronal dysfunction and impair recovery of function after injury and can be exacerbated in the aged brain where white matter damage is prevalent. Therapies...
Article
Protein malnutrition during gestation alters brain development and produces specific behavioral and cognitive changes that persist into adulthood and increase the risks of neuropsychiatric disorders. Given evidence for the role of the prefrontal cortex in such diseases, it is significant that studies in humans and animal models have shown that pren...
Article
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As human lifespan increases and the population ages, diseases of aging such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are a major cause for concern. Although calorie restriction (CR) as an intervention has been shown to increase healthspan in many species, few studies have examined the effects of CR on brain aging in primates. Using postmortem tissue from a coho...
Article
Early neuroimaging work in twin studies focused on studying genetic and environmental influence on gray matter macrostructure. However, it is also important to understand how gray matter microstructure is influenced by genes and environment to facilitate future investigations of their influence in mental disorders. Advanced diffusion MRI (dMRI) mea...
Article
The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is important for decision‐making as it integrates motor plans with affective and contextual limbic information. Disruptions in these networks have been observed in depression, bipolar disorder, and post‐traumatic stress disorder. Yet, overlap of limbic and motor connections within subdivisions of the ACC is not w...
Preprint
Full-text available
Neural tissue engineering, nanotechnology and neuroregeneration are diverse biomedical disciplines that have been working together in recent decades to solve the complex problems linked to central nervous system (CNS) repair. It is known that the CNS demonstrates a very limited regenerative capacity because of a microenvironment that impedes effect...
Article
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The rhesus macaque is an abundant species of Old World monkeys and a valuable model organism for biomedical research due to its close phylogenetic relationship to humans. Copy number variation is one of the main sources of genomic diversity within and between species and a widely recognized cause of inter-individual differences in disease risk. How...
Article
Functional recovery after cortical injury, such as stroke, is associated with neural circuit reorganization, but the underlying mechanisms and efficacy of therapeutic interventions promoting neural plasticity in primates are not well understood. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles (MSC-EVs), which mediate cell-to-cell i...
Article
We have previously reported that in salt-resistant rat phenotypes brain, Gαi2 (guanine nucleotide-binding protein alpha inhibiting activity polypeptide 2) proteins are required to maintain blood pressure and sodium balance. However, the impact of hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) Gαi2 proteins on the salt sensitivity of blood pressure is u...
Article
Introduction: Our laboratory demonstrated that monkeys treated after cortical injury with extracellular vesicles (EVs) derived from Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) had enhanced recovery compared to controls. To identify the EV-mediated neuroplastic changes involved in improved recovery, we assessed markers of myelin damage and plasticity in brain and c...
Article
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Individual variation in the addiction liability of amphetamines has a heritable genetic component. We previously identified Hnrnph1 (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1) as a quantitative trait gene underlying decreased methamphetamine-induced locomotor activity in mice. Here, we showed that mice (both females and males) with a heterozygous...
Article
Full-text available
Cortical injury, such as injuries after stroke or age-related ischemic events, triggers a cascade of degeneration accompanied by inflammatory responses that mediate neurological deficits. Therapeutics that modulate such neuroinflammatory responses in the aging brain have the potential to reduce neurological dysfunction and promote recovery. Extrace...
Preprint
Full-text available
Individual variation in the addiction liability of amphetamines has a heritable genetic component. We previously identified Hnrnph1 (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1) as a quantitative trait gene underlying decreased methamphetamine-induced locomotor activity in mice. Here, mice (both male and female) with a heterozygous mutation in the f...
Article
Full-text available
This study aims to characterize traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) neurophysiologically using an intramuscular fine-wire electromyography (EMG) electrode pair. EMG data were collected from an agonist-antagonist pair of tail muscles of Macaca fasicularis, pre- and post-lesion, and for a treatment and control group. The EMG signals were decomposed i...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Exosomes from mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are endosome-derived vesicles that have been shown to enhance functional recovery in rodent models of stroke. Objective: Building on these findings, we tested exosomes as a treatment in monkeys with cortical injury. Methods: After being trained on a task of fine motor function of the h...
Article
Full-text available
White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) are frequently seen on brain magnetic resonance imaging scans of older people. Usually interpreted clinically as a surrogate for cerebral small vessel disease, WMHs are associated with increased likelihood of cognitive impairment and dementia (including Alzheimer's disease [AD]). WMHs are also seen in cognitivel...
Article
Cortical injury elicits long-term cytotoxic and cytoprotective mechanisms within the brain and the balance of these pathways can determine the functional outcome for the individual. Cytotoxicity is exacerbated by pro- duction of reactive oxygen species, accumulation of iron, and peroxidation of cell membranes and myelin. There are currently no neur...
Article
Full-text available
Exposure to prenatal protein malnutrition (PPM) leads to a reprogramming of the brain, altering executive functions involving the prefrontal cortex (PFC). In this study we used in vivo microdialysis to assess the effects of PPM on extracellular concentrations of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) bilaterally in the ventral port...
Data
The average weight of all pups after weaning, by diet group, excluding litters with less than four pups and animals on food restriction for behavioral testing. ∗p < 0.05 different compared to 6/25 (malnourished) animals, ANOVA.
Article
Objectives To test whether collagen 4A1 in cerebral small arteries associated with age, hypertension or small vessel disease (SVD). Design Neuropathology cohort study. Subjects Older people age >65 years with minimal Alzheimer’s Disease. Methods We examined subcortical white matter in archived brain tissue from older people (n=34, 15F/19M, media...
Article
Full-text available
In this study, we tested Mesenchymal Stem Cell derived exosomes as a therapeutic to enhance recovery in our established nonhuman primate model of cortical injury. After pretraining monkeys on fine motor hand task,10 aged female monkeys were randomly assigned to an exosome treatment group (n=5) or a vehicle control (PBS) group (n=5). Then, in a sing...
Article
Motor dysfunction of the upper extremity can result from stroke, cortical injury and neurological diseases and causes significant disruption of activities of daily living. While some spontaneous recovery in terms of compensatory movements does occur after injury to cortical motor areas, full recovery is rare. The distinction between complete recove...
Conference Paper
Objectives: To test whether collagen 4A1 in cerebral small arteries associated with age, hypertension or small vessel disease (SVD). Design: Neuropathology cohort study. Subjects: Older people age >65 years with minimal Alzheimer’s Disease. Methods: We examined subcortical white matter in archived brain tissue from older people (n=34, 15F/19M, me...
Article
Full-text available
Curcumin has recently been shown to be a potential treatment for slowing or ameloriating cognitive decline during aging in our nonhuman primate model of normal aging. In these same monkeys, we studied for the first time the neurological impacts of long-term curcumin treatments using longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Sixteen rhesus monk...
Article
Progress in neurodevelopmental brain research has been achieved through the use of animal models. Such models not only help understanding biological changes that govern brain development, maturation and aging, but are also essential for identifying possible mechanisms of neurodevelopmental and age-related chronic disorders, and to evaluate possible...
Article
Stroke results in enduring damage to the brain which is accompanied by innate neurorestorative processes, such as reorganization of surviving circuits. Nevertheless, patients are often left with permanent residual impairments. Cell based therapy is an emerging therapeutic that may function to enhance the innate neurorestorative capacity of the brai...
Article
Aged individuals experience decreased fine motor function of the hand and digits, which could result, in part, from the chronic, systemic state of inflammation that occurs with aging. Recent research for treating age-related inflammation has focused on the effects of nutraceuticals that have anti-inflammatory properties. One particular dietary poly...
Article
Full-text available
Here we present the results of experiments involving cynomolgus macaques, in which a model of traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) was created by using a balloon catheter inserted into the epidural space. Prior to the creation of the lesion, we inserted an EMG recording device to facilitate measurement of tail movement and muscle activity before and...
Article
Full-text available
Mammalian aging is associated with decline in cognitive functions. Studies searching for a cause of cognitive aging initially focused on neuronal loss but quantitative investigations of rat, monkey, and human brain using stereology demonstrated that in normal aging, unlike in neurodegenerative disease, neurons are not lost. Instead, electron micros...
Article
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Introduction: An animal model of late-onset Alzheimer's disease is needed to research what causes degeneration in the absence of dominant genetic insults and why the association cortex is particularly vulnerable to degeneration. Methods: We studied the progression of tau and amyloid cortical pathology in the aging rhesus macaque using immunoelec...
Article
Full-text available
Studies of both humans and non-human primates have demonstrated that aging is typically characterized by a decline in cognition that can occur as early as the fifth decade of life. Age-related changes in working memory are particularly evident and mediated, in part, by the prefrontal cortex, an area known to evidence age-related changes in myelin t...
Article
Full-text available
Gyrencephalic brains exhibit deformations of the six neocortical laminae at gyral crowns and sulcal depths, where the deeper layers are, respectively, expanded and compressed. The present study addresses: (1) the degree to which the underlying white matter neurons (WMNs) observe the same changes at gyral crowns and sulcal depths; and (2) whether th...
Article
Full-text available
While cognitive decline is observed in the normal aging monkey, neurons are not lost with age. Instead, frontal white matter is lost as myelin degenerates and both correlate with age-related cognitive decline. As age-related myelin damage increases, there should be an increase in clearance of damaged myelin by microglial phagocytosis. In this study...
Article
Brain fiber pathways are presumed to follow smooth curves but recent high angular resolution diffusion MRI (dMRI) suggests that instead they follow 3 primary axes often nearly orthogonal. To investigate this, we analyzed axon pathways under monkey primary motor cortex with (1) dMRI tractography, (2) axon tract tracing, and (3) axon immunohistochemi...
Article
Introduction: Stroke is the leading cause of long-term disability in the United States due to impairments that endure after brain injury. While studies in rodent models have evaluated numerous neurorestorative treatments following stroke, none have received FDA approval. We evaluated a therapy using human umbilical tissue-derived cells (hUTC) as a...
Article
Full-text available
Storage of tissue sections for long periods allows multiple samples, acquired over months or years, to be processed together, in the same reagents, for quantitative histochemical studies. Protocols for freezer storage of free-floating frozen sections using sucrose with different additives have been reported and assert that storage has no effect on...