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Douglas Hamilton Johnson

Douglas Hamilton Johnson
Rift Valley Institute

Ph.D

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78
Publications
43,311
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Introduction
Douglas Hamilton Johnson is a fellow of the Rift Valley Institute. Douglas does research on the history of South Sudan and North East Africa. His is currently writing a book on the Juba conferences of 1947 and 1954 and is involved in co-authoring an historical dictionary of South Sudan.
Additional affiliations
July 1986 - September 1986
University of California, Los Angeles
Position
  • Visiting Assistant Professor
Description
  • Taught two courses in the Summer Quarter: Introduction to African Civilisations, and War and Famine in North East Africa from the 18th to 20th Century

Publications

Publications (78)
Chapter
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Abstract: Abyei, the CPA, and the War in Sudan’s New South The Comprehensive Peace Agreement succeeded in resolving Sudan’s oldest political question regarding the future of South Sudan, but its most obvious failure was the immediate resumption of war inside Sudan’s ‘New South’ along its border with South Sudan before the latter’s formal independen...
Book
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In 2011, South Sudan seceded from Sudan following a landmark referendum on self-determination. Yet fewer than three years after the historic vote for independence, the world’s newest country descended into a civil war that, since December 2013, has brought killing and bloodshed. In attempts to resolve the conflict and bring the civil war to an end,...
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The Revitalised Agreement on the Resolution of Conflict in South Sudan (R-ARCSS) signed on 12 September 2018, not only allows for a new government and security arrangements, it also provides for two new commissions to decide the number of internal states and their boundaries. In the following Q and A, RVI fellows Douglas Johnson (DJ) and Aly Verjee...
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Øystein H. Rolandsen and M. W. Daly, A History of South Sudan: from slavery to independence. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (hb £59.99 – 978 0 521 11631 2; pb £18.99 – 978 0 521 13325 8). 2016, xix + 171 pp. - Volume 88 Issue 2 - Douglas H. Johnson
Conference Paper
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Book
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In a paper a few years ago I discussed self-determination in South Sudanese political thought. In this paper I look at its twin, the idea of federalism. Federalism has once again become a central issue in political debate in South Sudan; the idea has a long pedigree in the country’s political history, and this paper gives an outline of that pedigre...
Article
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Examining the experiences of the South since Sudan's independence, this article analyses why the choice of ‘unity’ became an unrealistic option for South Sudanese. Stressing that self-determination for the South was the only way to resolve Sudan's long-standing national crisis, this article points out, at the same time, that it left unresolved the...
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The armed forces of Sudan and newly independent South Sudan recently clashed over the border area called Heglig by Khartoum and Panthou by Juba, in a dispute involving security, ownership of land, and control of oil production. The clash triggered swift condemnation of South Sudan for occupying Sudanese national territory. However, such pronounceme...
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The Abyei area has often been called Sudan’s Kashmir, a territory claimed by two nations. It could more aptly be described as Sudan’s West Bank, where a local population is being progressively dislodged and displaced by government-backed settlements. The Abyei Protocol in the Comprehensive Peace Agreement, or CPA, was supposed to address the root c...
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The demarcation of a North–South boundary in the Sudan opens up the possibility of the creation of a new international border in Africa, following the outcome of the Southern Sudanese and Abyei Area referenda in 2011. The line of the proposed boundary runs through the grazing areas of numerous pastoralist peoples, and it is these peoples who will b...
Chapter
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Land was one of the central issues contributing to the recent civil wars in the Sudan, and it is an underestimated and overlooked factor determining the success or failure of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) signed in 2005 (Pantuliano 2007: 3). Land has been central to the Sudan's colonial and postcolonial development policies, and land acce...
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The settlement of Sudanese soldier colonists throughout British East Africa was a legacy of colonial expansion and pacification. These settlements were developed from the institution of military slavery, which was marked by a close association of slave soldiers with the state and the isolation of military slave communities from the general populace...
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The Abyei Area, straddling the North–South border of Sudan, was the subject of a separate protocol in the Comprehensive Peace Agreement signed between the Sudan government and the Sudan People's Liberation Movement in January 2005. One provision of that protocol was the establishment of a boundaries commission to define the territory to be included...
Chapter
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‘Knowledge is power, in Africa and elsewhere’, wrote Sir Reginald Wingate in his foreword to the first issue of Sudan Notes and Records in 1918. As the director of the Egyptian Army’s Military Intelligence Department in the lead-up to the Reconquest, who was responsible for introducing the format of regular consolidated printed intelligence reports...
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An overlooked source in Northeast African history is the series of printed monthly intelligence reports issued first by the Egyptian, and then the Sudan intelligence department between 1892 and 1929. Initially prepared by F. W. Wingate, these reports at first contained reports on Egypt’s former territories in the Sudan, as well as in neighbouring c...
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LIFE ON AN AFRICAN FRONTIER. Imperial Boundary Making: The Diary of Captain Kelly and the Sudan–Uganda Boundary Commission of 1913. Edited by G. H. BLAKE. Oxford: Oxford University Press for the British Academy, 1997. Pp. xxxii+109. (ISBN 0-19-726154-X). - Volume 40 Issue 1 - DOUGLAS H. JOHNSON
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SUDANESE SOLDIERS IN MEXICO. A Black Corps d'Élite: An Egyptian Sudanese Conscript Battalion with the French Army in Mexico, 1863–1867, and its Survivors in Subsequent African History. By RICHARD HILL and PETER HOGG. East Lansing, MI: Michigan State University Press, 1995. Pp. xxii+214. No price given. (ISBN 0-87013-339-X). - - Volume 40 Issue...
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Clientelism in Sudan - Sudan, 1898–1989: The Unstable State. By WoodwardPeter. Boulder: Lynne Rienner Publishers; London: Lester Crook Academic Publishing, 1990. Pp. xii+273. £25 (ISBN 1-55587-193-3). - Volume 35 Issue 1 - Douglas H. Johnson
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Kings of Taqali - Soldiers, Traders, and Slaves: State Formation and Economic Transformation in the Greater Nile Valley, 1700–1885. By EwaldJanet J.. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1990. Pp. xiii + 270. $45 ($19.95 paperback). - Volume 34 Issue 3 - Douglas H. Johnson
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The Gaawar Nuer recall a battle called Mut Roal which Deng Laka, the prophet of the divinity DIU, fought against the Twic Dinka and their “Arab” allies. In this battle the Dinka and the Arabs failed to coordinate their movements, were attacked, and were defeated singly. Deng Laka himself is said to have personally killed the “Arab” commander. A num...
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Anthropologists and historians of eastern African societies have long shared a common interest in the description and analysis of African religions and beliefs. Spirit possession, mediumship, witchcraft beliefs, diviners and divinatory techniques, the role of prophets and the nature of prophetic traditions are all subjects for which there is now an...
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This article examines the impact of a military institution on civilian life in Northeast Africa. Slave armies used by a series of states during the conquest of the Sudan and East Africa drew on societies on the periphery of the state and spread networks of military and military-derived communities, all defining themselves by reference to the state...
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Fonti Comboniane per la Storia dell' Africa Nord-orientale, vol. II. By LucianiSilvia and TaddiaIrma (Fonti e Studi Italiani per la Storia dell' Africa, 3). Cagliari: Università degli Studi di Cagliari (Istituto di Studi Africani e Orientali), 1988. Pp. III. No price indicated. - Volume 31 Issue 3 - Douglas H. Johnson
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The enduring ethnographic image of the pastoral Nilotes of the Upper Nile of the Sudan is that of peoples structurally opposed to each other with only limited social and economic ties between major ethnic groups. This image is derived from Evans-Pritchard's study of the Nuer, which was based on field work in the early 1930s. This was a time when bo...
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Administrative commitment to customary law among the Nuer wavered under British rule. Its value was first briefly appreciated as a means of obtaining the effective submission of the people to government authority. By igio dissatisfaction with the rate of progress of submission led provincial officials to abandon active involvement in the settlement...
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Examines how environmental changes correlate with human history in the region. While local societies are restricted by the environment of the plains, their responses to those restrictions have been varied. -from Author
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The ethnographic record of Africa, on which anthropologists and historicans rely, is drawn from accounts of widely varying quality written by observers of varying ability. It is frequently distorted, and while we often suspect distortion in specific accounts, we are not always able to pinpoint how that distortion occurred or on what sources it was...
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SandersonL. M. Passmore and SandersonG. N.: Eduction, religion and polities in southern sudan 1899–1964. (Sudan Studies, No. 4.) vi, 511 pp., 3 maps. London: Ithaca Press; Khartoum: Khartoum University Press, 1981. £16.50. - Volume 46 Issue 1 - Douglas H. Johnson
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Sudanese Ethno–Geography - Ethno–Geography of the Bahr el Ghazal (Sudan). An Attempt at a Historical Reconstruction. By SantandreaS. with a foreword By GrayRichard. Bologna: Editrice Missionaria Italiana, 1981. Pp. 168, 7 maps. L 20,000. - Volume 23 Issue 4 - Douglas H. Johnson
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Nuer–Dinka relations are usually described as being based on constant mutual hostility. An examination of Nuer–Dinka relations along the Sobat and Zaraf valleys since the beginning of Nuer eastward expansion in the nineteenth century reveals a different pattern. Conflict during the immediate Nuer conquest of Dinka territory was followed by assimila...
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TOWARDS THE END of 1928, as E. E. Evans-Pritcha rd was completing his first year of study among the Azande, he wrote to various of his friends in the Sudan Government in Khartoum, including the Civil Secretary, Harold MacMichael, outlining his plans for the immediate future. He intended to return to England for a year to write up his material on th...
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The historiography of the southern Sudan offers few examples of the critical assessment of sources. Surprisingly, the only conscious attempts at source evaluation have been made by anthropologists or ethnographers. Most historians and political scientists have been preoccupied with chronologies of administration and policy based on colonial documen...
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Introduction In the one hundred and forty years that the Nuer have been known to small audiences outside the Sudan they have almost invariably been presented as truculent and aggressive warriors. They appeared in the nineteenth century exploration literature as archetypical ‘savages’: naked, stubborn and warlike men who were compared to monkeys, to...
Article
Typescript. Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of California, Loas Angeles. Bibliography: leaves 743-767. Photocopy.

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