Dorothee Sandmann

Dorothee Sandmann
Georg-August-Universität Göttingen | GAUG · Department of Animal Ecology

Dipl.-Biol.

About

64
Publications
8,921
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
609
Citations
Introduction
My work revolves around the ecology of oribatid mites. Research locations have mainly been Ecuador and Indonesia.

Publications

Publications (64)
Article
Full-text available
Land-use change is threatening biodiversity worldwide and is predicted to increase in the next decades, especially in tropical regions. Most studies focused on the response of single or few species to land-use change, only few investigated the response of entire communities. In particular the response of belowground communities to changes in land u...
Article
Full-text available
In tropical forest ecosystems leaf litter from a large variety of species enters the de-composer system, however, the impact of leaf litter diversity on the abundance and activity of soil organisms during decomposition is little known. We investigated the effect of leaf litter diversity and identity on microbial functions and the abundance of micro...
Article
Full-text available
Herein, we update the diagnosis and description of the genus Krantzolaspina Datta & Bhattacharjee and provide a list of the three valid species including new combinations and synonyms, as follows: 1) Krant-zolaspina angustatus (Ishikawa, 1987) comb. nov. (= Indutolaelaps jiroftensis Hajizadeh et al., 2017 syn. nov.), 2) K. rebatii Datta & Bhattacha...
Article
Full-text available
A new species of blattisociid mites Lasioseius orangrimbae n. sp., that belongs to the floridensis-group, is described based on females and males from litter and soil samples of secondary rainforest in Sumatra, Indonesia.
Article
Full-text available
Oil palm plantations are expanding rapidly throughout Southeast Asia due to increasing global food demand, thereby putting greater pressure on local ecosystems. These plantations usually replace rainforests, resulting in major losses of soil structure and fertility, and belowground biodiversity. However, despite causing soil degradation, oil palms...
Article
Full-text available
Land-use change is threatening biodiversity worldwide, affecting above and below ground animal communities by altering their trophic niches. However, shifts in trophic niches with changes in land use are little studied and this applies in particular to belowground animals. Oribatid mites are among the most abundant soil animals, involved in decompo...
Article
Full-text available
Two new species of haplozetid oribatid mites (Oribatida, Haplozetidae) are described on the basis of adult specimens sampled from litter and soil in Sumatra, Indonesia: Haplozetes bayartogtokhi sp. nov. differs from Haplozetes biheterodactylus Ermilov & Tolstikov, 2015 by the presence of minute interlamellar setae, foveolate anterior part of the no...
Article
Full-text available
The genus Kalloia (Oribatida, Carabodidae) is recorded in the Oriental region for the first time. A new species — Kalloia gerdweigmanni n. sp. — is described from litter of oil palm plantations and jungle rubber agroforests from Sumatra, Indonesia. It differs from Kalloia simpliseta Mahunka, 1985 by the presence of a transverse ridge in the mediodi...
Article
Full-text available
Two new species of oribatid mites of the genus Protoribates (Oribatida, Haplozetidae) are described from litter and soil in Indonesia. Protoribates prolamellatus sp. nov. differs from Protoribates lemensis Ermilov & Tolstikov, 2015 by smaller body size, and the presence of monodactylous legs and short notogastral setae. Protoribates heinrichi sp. n...
Article
Full-text available
Major research progress in ecology is being achieved through large-scale collaborations across people, groups and countries. In large-scale projects harmonization of data is tedious and time-consuming, but needs to be done reliably and rapidly. This is especially true if projects investigate under-explored organism groups such as tropical invertebr...
Article
Full-text available
Ecological roles of underexplored groups, such as tropical invertebrates, can be inferred from their functional traits, such as body mass, dispersal ability, reproductive mode and feeding habits. Despite a strong need, a common database for invertebrate traits is yet to be created. Traits are defined as a property of individual organisms, however m...
Article
Full-text available
A species of laelapid mite, Ololaelaps formidabilis, is redescribed based on male and female adults from soil in Sumatra, Indonesia. This species is distinguished from other Ololaelaps species by its metapodal platelet narrowly fused with the parapodal plate and by its hologastric shield having two inverted-V-like ridges. The genus is redescribed b...
Article
Full-text available
Aims This study assesses the importance of root- and mycorrhiza-derived resources for decomposition processes and as food resources for microarthropod communities along an altitudinal gradient of tropical montane rainforests in southern Ecuador. Methods At 1000, 2000 and 3000 m microcosms with openings of different mesh sizes (4 mm, 45 μm) or clos...
Article
Full-text available
1.Many ecosystem functions depend on the structure of food webs, which heavily relies on the body size spectrum of the community. Despite that, little is known on how the size spectrum of soil animals responds to agricultural practices in tropical land‐use systems and how these responses affect ecosystem functioning. 2.We studied land‐use induced c...
Article
Microarthropods impact organic matter turnover and nutrient cycling via processing of organic matter entering the soil as litter and root exudates. Variations in the structure of soil microarthropod communities are due to both biotic and abiotic factors such as local climatic conditions and litter quality. However, in particular in tropical ecosyst...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated the role of leaf litter chemistry and richness in affecting testate amoeba communities of tropical rainforest in the Ecuadorian Andes. Litterbags containing leaf litter from four dominating tree species (Clusia sp., Myrcia pubescens, Graffenrieda emarginata, and Cecropia andina) with richness 1, 2, and 4 species were established and...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated how altitude affects the decomposition of leaf and root litter in the Andean tropical montane rainforest of southern Ecuador, that is, through changes in the litter quality between altitudes or other site-specific differences in microenvironmental conditions. Leaf litter from three abundant tree species and roots of different diamet...
Article
Full-text available
Seven new species of oribatid mites of the genus Galumna are described from litter and soil materials of Sumatra, Indonesia. A new subgenus, Galumna (Atypicogalumna) subgen. n., is proposed; it differs from all galumnid genera and subgenera by the simultaneous presence of porose areas and sacculi on the notogaster (vs. either porose areas or saccul...
Article
Full-text available
A new species of oribatid mite of the genus Pergalumna (Oribatida, Galumnidae) is described from litter and soil materials in Sumatra, Indonesia. Pergalumna paraindistincta sp. n. is morphologically most similar to P. indistincta Ermilov & Anichkin, 2011, P. pertrichosa Mahunka, 1995 and P. sura Balogh, 1997; however, the new species differs from P...
Article
Full-text available
Two new species of oribatid mites of the genus Allogalumna (Oribatida, Galumnidae) are described from litter and soil materials of Sumatra, Indonesia. Allogalumna indonesiensis sp. n. is morphologically most similar to A. borhidii Balogh & Mahunka, 1979, A. quadrimaculata (Mahunka, 1988), A. rotundiceps Aoki, 1996 and A. plowmanae Balogh & Balogh,...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated the response of soil microbial communities in tropical ecosystems to increased nutrient deposition, such as predicted by anthropogenic change scenarios. Moderate amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus and their combination were added along an altitudinal transect. We expected microorganisms and microbial grazers (testate amoebae) to sig...
Article
Full-text available
Two new species of oribatid mites, Hermannobates dilatatus sp. nov. and Rhynchoribates longisetosus sp. nov., are described from Ecuadorian soils. Hermannobates dilatatus sp. nov. is most similar to H. ruseki Starý, 1998, however, it differs from the latter by the smaller body size, absence of flagelliform posterior notogastral setae, bacilliform e...
Article
Full-text available
A new oribatid mite species, Perscheloribates paratzitzikamaensis n. sp., is described from Ecuador. This species is morphologically similar to Perscheloribates tzitzikamaensis (Pletzen, 1965) from South Africa, however, it differs from the latter by the smaller body size, longer notogastral setae pi, the absence of a translamellar line and prolame...
Article
Full-text available
A new oribatid mite species, Perscheloribates paratzitzikamaensis n. sp., is described from Ecuador. This species is morphologically similar to Perscheloribates tzitzikamaensis (Pletzen, 1965) from South Africa, however, it differs from the latter by the smaller body size, longer notogastral setae p1, the absence of a translamellar line and prolame...
Article
Full-text available
A new microzetid mite species of the genus Orthozetes, O. bidentatus sp. n., from the upper organic soil layer of mostly undisturbed rain forest of Ecuador is described. The new species differs from all species of the genus by the presence of interlamellar setae. The genus Orthozetes is recorded in Ecuador for the first time.
Article
Full-text available
We described two new species, Haplozetes paraminimicoma sp. n. and Protoribates ecuadoriensis sp. n. from Ecuador. Additionally, a detailed supplementary description of Trachyoribates (Rostrozetes) glaber (Beck, 1965) is given on the basis of Ecuadorian specimens, which was known previously only from Peru. An annotated checklist of all identifie...
Article
Full-text available
An annotated checklist of identified Ecuadorian Oppioidea (10 species of 10 genera of three families) is presented. The genera Hammerella, Taiwanoppia, subgenera Hammerella (Woasella), Taiwanoppia (Paragloboppia) and the species T. (P.) trichotos (Balogh et Mahunka, 1977) are recorded for the first time in Ecuador. One new species of the family Gra...
Article
Full-text available
Two new oppiid mite species of the genus Gittella, G. variabilis spec. nov. and G. minor spec. nov., are described from Southern Ecuador. The first new species is most morphologically similar to Gittella maxima (Balogh & Mahunka, 1981), however, it differs from the latter by the morphology of sensilli, notogastral senasilli and epimeral region. The...
Article
Full-text available
The new genus Neoctenogalumna gen. nov. with Ctenogalumna moresonensis Engelbrecht, 1972 as a type species and the new subgenus Neoctenogalumna (Paractenogalumna) subgen. nov. with Neoctenogalumna (Paractenogalumna) lon-giciliata sp. nov. as a type species are proposed. Four new species Allogalumna ampla sp. nov., Galumna miniporosa sp. nov., Perga...
Chapter
Full-text available
Nutrient inputs into ecosystems of the tropical mountain rainforest region are projected to further increase in the next decades. To investigate whether important ecosystem services such as nutrient cycling and matter turnover in native forests and pasture ecosystems show different patterns of response, two nutrient addition experiments have been e...
Article
We investigated changes in density, proportion of parthenogenetic species and individuals, and community structure of oribatid mites (Oribatida, Acari) along an altitudinal gradient in tropical montane rain forests in southern Ecuador. We hypothesized that the proportion of parthenogenetic species and individuals increases whereas density decreases...
Article
Full-text available
Two new oribatid mite species, Machadobelba longiciliata sp. nov. (Machadobelbidae) and Campachipteria brevisetosa sp. nov. (Achipteriidae), are described from upper organic soil layer in mostly undisturbed rain forest of Podocarpus National Park, Ecuador. Machadobelba longiciliata sp. nov. is most similar to Machadobelba descombesi Mahunka, howeve...
Chapter
Full-text available
Current preserving services in the tropical mountain forest of Southern Ecuador are discussed, with a focus on arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, microarthropods (oribatid mites), and protists (testate amoebae). Diversity patterns of AM fungi are described in a comparison of native forest with its anthropogenic replacement system of low plant diver...
Article
Full-text available
Two new oribatid mite species of the genus Truncozetes (Oribatida, Epactozetidae), Truncozetes ecuadoriensis sp. n. and Truncozetes monodactylus sp. n., are described from the Ecuadorian soils. The morphology of the gnathosoma and the legs is presented in detail for the first time for the species of Truncozetes. An identification key to all known s...
Article
Full-text available
Three new oppioid mite species of the genus Sternoppia, S. paraincisa sp. nov., S. paramirabilis sp. nov. and S. fissurata sp. nov., are described. Sternoppia paraincisa sp. nov. is most similar morphologically to Sternoppia incisa Balogh & Mahunka, 1977 from Bolivia, however, it differs from the latter by smaller body size, presence of notogastral...
Article
Full-text available
Two new microzetid mite species of the genus Schalleria, Schalleria brevisetosa sp. nov. and Schalleria pectinata sp. nov., are described. The morphology of the gnathosoma and the legs is presented in detail for the first time for a species of this genus. An identification key to all known species of Schalleria is provided.http://zoobank.org/urn:ls...
Article
Full-text available
Three new oribatid mite species - Ampullobates ecuadoriensis n. sp., Plenotocepheus neotropicus n. sp. and Monoschelobates hemileiformis n. sp. - are described from Ecuador. The three genera are also new for Ecuador. Ampullobates ecuadoriensis n. sp. is morphologically similar to Ampullobates nigriclavatus Grandjean, but differs from the latter by...
Article
Full-text available
Tropical regions are facing increasing atmospheric inputs of nutrients, which will have unknown consequences for the structure and functioning of these systems. Here, we show that Neotropical montane rainforests respond rapidly to moderate additions of N (50 kg ha(-1) yr(-1)) and P (10 kg ha(-1) yr(-1)). Monitoring of nutrient fluxes demonstrated t...
Data
Soil nutrient status of the experimental plots in July 2007 prior to the first fertilization. (DOC)
Data
Location of the study area in southern Ecuador and outline of the Ecuadorian Nutrient Manipulation EXperiment (NUMEX). (DOC)
Data
Ranges and means of all parameters shown in Figures 1 – 5 . (DOC)
Article
Full-text available
The structure and functioning of decomposer systems heavily relies on soil moisture. However, this has been primarily studied in temperate ecosystems; little is known about how soil moisture affects the microfaunal food web in tropical regions. This lack of knowledge is surprising, since the microfaunal food web controls major ecosystem processes....
Chapter
Full-text available
The typical macrodecomposer species of lowland rain forests, such as termites, are rare or lacking in tropical mountain rainforests. We therefore hypothesized that small soil animals dominate the decomposer system and drive decomposition processes. To prove these hypotheses we investigated the density, diversity, community structure and functioni...
Chapter
Full-text available
Tropical mountain rain forests form biodiversity hotspots for a number of animal and plant taxa (Küper et al. 2004; see Chapter 2 in this volume). Only a few taxa, such as parasitic Hymenoptera, appear not to conform to the general rule of increasing diversity from temperate to tropical regions (Gauld et al. 1992). However, one important component...

Network