Dominique G. Roche

Dominique G. Roche
Carleton University · Department of Biology

Postdoctoral Fellow

About

77
Publications
34,417
Reads
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1,930
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2018 - present
Carleton University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
June 2014 - August 2018
Université de Neuchâtel
Position
  • PostDoc Position
March 2009 - November 2013
Australian National University
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (77)
Article
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Collaborative hunting, the coordination of animal behaviour in space and time to capture prey, is reported in several vertebrate species. However, previous studies are observational, hampering our ability to identify individual decision rules that result in collaboration. We experimentally investigated collaborative hunting in yellow saddle goatfis...
Article
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Animal 'personality', defined as repeatable inter-individual differences in behaviour, is a concept in biology that faces intense controversy. Critics argue that the field is riddled with terminological and methodological inconsistencies and lacks a sound theoretical framework. Nevertheless, experimental biologists are increasingly studying individ...
Article
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Cleaning organisms play a fundamental ecological role by removing ectoparasites and infected tissue from client surfaces. We used the well-studied cleaning mutualisms involving the cleaner wrasse,Labroides dimidiatus,to test how client cognition is affected by ectoparasites and whether these effects are mitigated by cleaners. Ambon damselfish (Poma...
Article
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Policies that mandate public data archiving (PDA) successfully increase accessibility to data underlying scientific publications. However, is the data quality sufficient to allow reuse and reanalysis? We surveyed 100 datasets associated with nonmolecular studies in journals that commonly publish ecological and evolutionary research and have a stron...
Article
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Historical and long-term environmental datasets are imperative to understanding how natural systems respond to our changing world. Although immensely valuable, these data are at risk of being lost unless actively curated and archived in data repositories. The practice of data rescue, which we define as identifying, preserving, and sharing valuable...
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Many leading journals in ecology and evolution now mandate open data upon publication. Yet, there is very little oversight to ensure the completeness and reusability of archived datasets, and we currently have a poor understanding of the factors associated with high-quality data sharing. We assessed 362 open datasets linked to first- or senior-auth...
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Early definitions of conservation focused largely on the end goals of protection or restoration of nature, and the various disciplinary domains that contribute to these ends. Conservation science and practice has evolved beyond being focused on just issues of scarcity and biodiversity decline. To better recognize the inherent links between human be...
Article
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Ecosurveillance has proliferated in recent years, generating vast amounts of data on the natural environment. Ecosurveillance also has significant potential impacts on humans; therefore, researchers and policymakers need new conceptual tools to anticipate and mitigate any negative effects. Surveillance studies is an interdisciplinary field in the s...
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In a recent editorial, the Editors-in-Chief of Journal of Experimental Biology argued that consensus building, data sharing, and better integration across disciplines are needed to address the urgent scientific challenges posed by climate change. We agree and expand on the importance of cross-disciplinary integration and transparency to improve con...
Article
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Open scholarship has transformed research, and introduced a host of new terms in the lexicon of researchers. The ‘Framework for Open and Reproducible Research Teaching’ (FORRT) community presents a crowdsourced glossary of open scholarship terms to facilitate education and effective communication between experts and newcomers.
Article
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Unreliable research programmes waste funds, time, and even the lives of the organisms we seek to help and understand. Reducing this waste and increasing the value of scientific evidence require changing the actions of both individual researchers and the institutions they depend on for employment and promotion. While ecologists and evolutionary biol...
Article
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For better or for worse, authorship is a currency in scholarly research and advancement. In scholarly writing, authorship is widely acknowledged as a means of conferring credit but is also tied to concepts such as responsibility and accountability. Authorship is one of the most divisive topics both at the level of the research team and more broadly...
Article
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The knowledge‐action gap in conservation science and practice occurs when research outputs do not result in actions to protect or restore biodiversity. Among the diverse and complex reasons for this gap, three barriers are fundamental: knowledge is often unavailable to practitioners, challenging to interpret, and/or difficult to use. Problems of av...
Preprint
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We assessed the quality of 362 open datasets shared by 100 principal investigators (PIs) in ecology and evolution to identify predictors of data quality. Datasets generally scored low on completeness and reusability, but these metrics were slightly higher for more recently archived datasets and PIs with less seniority. Journal data sharing policies...
Article
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Game-theoretical models help us understand how and when cooperation can evolve and persist. However, current models fall short of explaining the striking amount of variation in cooperation levels that we observe in nature, even within a system. For example, an animal's ability to choose partners with which to interact can explain the maintenance of...
Article
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Authorship should acknowledge and reward those deserving of such credit. Moreover, being an author on a paper also means that one assumes ownership of the content. Journals are increasingly requiring author roles to be specified at time of submission using schemes such as the contributor roles taxonomy (CRediT) system, which relies on 14 different...
Article
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Open data facilitate reproducibility and accelerate scientific discovery but are hindered by perceptions that researchers bear costs and gain few benefits from publicly sharing their data, with limited empirical evidence to the contrary. We surveyed 140 faculty members working in ecology and evolution across Canada's top 20 ranked universities and...
Article
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Fish often evade predators with a fast-start escape response. Studies typically examine this behaviour in still water despite water motion being an inherent feature of aquatic ecosystems. In shallow habitats, waves create complex flows that likely influence escape performance, particularly in small fishes with low absolute swimming speeds relative...
Preprint
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Evidence-based decision-making often depends on some form of a synthesis of previous findings. There is growing recognition that systematic reviews, which incorporate a critical appraisal of evidence, are the gold standard synthesis method in applied environmental science. Yet, on a daily basis, environmental practitioners and decision-makers are f...
Article
Evidence-based decision-making often depends on some form of a synthesis of previous findings. There is growing recognition that systematic reviews, which incorporate a critical appraisal of evidence, are the gold standard synthesis method in applied environmental science. Yet, on a daily basis, environmental practitioners and decision-makers are f...
Article
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To address the ongoing global biodiversity crisis, conservation approaches must be underpinned by robust information. Canada is uniquely positioned to contribute to meeting global biodiversity targets, with some of the world's largest remaining intact ecosystems, and a commitment to co-application of Indigenous ways of knowing alongside scientific,...
Article
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Scientific evidence is fundamental for guiding effective conservation action to curb biodiversity loss. Yet, research resources in conservation are often wasted due to biased allocation of research effort, irrelevant or low‐priority questions, flawed studies, inaccessible research outputs, and biased or poor‐quality reporting. We outline a striking...
Article
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Indirect effects of predators can manifest themselves as changes in prey behaviour and physiology. Given that digestion requires energy, it has been suggested that prey will choose to eat smaller meals under predation risk to reserve a larger portion of the aerobic metabolic scope they have available for energetically demanding tasks more critical...
Article
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Governments worldwide are releasing data into the public domain via open government data initiatives. Many such data sets are directly relevant to environmental science and complement data collected by academic researchers to address complex and challenging environmental problems. The Government of Canada is a leader in open data among Organisation...
Article
Article impact statement: COVID-19 has demonstrated the need to optimize research activity, convey the gravity of loss, and reevaluate merit in conservation science.
Article
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Our response to Munday et al.’s ‘Matters Arising’ letter, which addresses the key arguments they raised, is published alongside their letter (our response is referred to below as “our main document”). However, the word limit of our response set by Nature made it difficult to respond in sufficient detail, so we have copied each of the 16 points rais...
Preprint
Open data facilitate reproducibility and accelerate scientific discovery but are hindered by perceptions that researchers bear costs and gain few benefits from publicly sharing their data, with limited empirical evidence to the contrary. We surveyed 140 faculty members working in ecology and evolution across Canada’s top 20-ranked universities and...
Article
Full-text available
Behavioural lateralization, the asymmetric expression of cognitive functions, is reported to enhance key fitness-relevant traits such as group coordination, multitasking and predator escape. Therefore, studies reporting negative effects on lateralization in fish due to environmental stressors such as ocean acidification, hypoxia and pollutants are...
Article
Surveillance of animal movements using electronic tags (i.e., biotelemetry) has emerged as an essential tool for both basic and applied ecological research and monitoring. Advances in animal tracking are occurring simultaneously with changes to technology, in an evolving global scientific culture that increasingly promotes data sharing and transpar...
Article
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Teaching can be a rewarding, yet challenging, experience for early career researchers (ECRs) in fields like ecology and evolution. Much of this challenge arises from the reality that ECRs in ecology and evolution typically receive little, if any, pedagogical training or advice on how to balance teaching, research (which can include extended field w...
Article
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Many “client” coral reef fishes have their ectoparasites removed by the “cleaner” wrasse Labroides dimidiatus in mutualistic interactions. Clients regularly receiving cleaning services reportedly benefit from increased growth and cognitive performance, but the underlying physiological changes that covary with such benefits are unknown. Here, we tes...
Article
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The partial pressure of CO2 in the oceans has increased rapidly over the past century, driving ocean acidification and raising concern for the stability of marine ecosystems1–3. Coral reef fishes are predicted to be especially susceptible to end-of-century ocean acidification on the basis of several high-profile papers4,5 that have reported profoun...
Article
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To develop an evolutionary theory of social decision making, we require an understanding of how in- dividuals utilize environmental cues to form decision rules. We exposed ‘cleaner’ fish (bluestreak cleaner wrasse, Labroides dimidiatus) to a biological market task, where giving priority to an ephemeral (i.e. ‘visitor’ client) food plate, over a per...
Article
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Physiological mechanisms determining thermal limits in fishes are debated but remain elusive. It has been hypothesised that motor function loss, observed as loss of equilibrium during acute warming, is due to direct thermal effects on brain neuronal function. To test this, we mounted cooling plates on the heads of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and qu...
Article
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Discussions around the "slow science movement" abound in environmental sciences, yet they are generally counterproductive. Researchers must focus on producing robust and transparent knowledge, regardless of speed. Slow versus fast science is irrelevant - what we need is reproducible research to support evidence-based decision making and tackle urge...
Preprint
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https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/658062v1 The physiological mechanisms determining thermal limits in fishes are debated but remain elusive. It has been hypothesised that loss of motor function observed as a loss of equilibrium during an acute thermal challenge is due to direct thermal effects on brain neuronal function. To test this hypothe...
Article
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Arthropods play a dominant role in natural and human-modified terrestrial ecosystem dynamics. Spatially-explicit arthropod population time-series data are crucial for statistical or mathematical models of these dynamics and assessment of their veterinary, medical, agricultural, and ecological impacts. Such data have been collected world-wide for ov...
Article
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1.Automated movement tracking is essential for high‐throughput quantitative analyses of the behaviour and kinematics of organisms. Automated tracking also improves replicability by avoiding observer bias and allowing reproducible workflows. However, few automated tracking programs exist that are open access, open source, and capable of tracking unm...
Preprint
The PREPRINT is publicly available here: https://doi.org/10.32942/osf.io/6kcwa ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ABSTRACT: Behavioural lateralisation, defined as the asymmetric expression of cognitive functions, is reported to enhance...
Preprint
Full-text available
Arthropods play a dominant role in natural and human-modified terrestrial ecosystem dynamics. Spatially-explicit population time-series are crucial for statistical or mathematical models of these dynamics and assessment of their veterinary, medical, agricultural, and ecological impacts. Arthropod data have been collected world-wide for over a centu...
Preprint
Full-text available
1. Automated movement tracking is essential for high-throughput quantitative analyses of the behaviour and kinematics of organisms. Automated tracking also improves replicability by avoiding observer biases and allowing reproducible workflows. However, few automated tracking programs exist that are open access, open source, and capable of tracking...
Article
Full-text available
Group formation (shoaling) with conspecifics is common in fishes and provides several antipredator benefits, such as improved food and predator detection. However, coral reef fishes often form mixed-species shoals, which can generate costs for some group members. For example, individuals that stand out from a group are more likely to be targeted by...
Article
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The Commentary by Pörtner, Bock and Mark (Pörtner et al., 2017) elaborates on the oxygen- and capacity-limited thermal tolerance (OCLTT) hypothesis. Journal of Experimental Biology Commentaries allow for personal and controversial views, yet the journal also mandates that ‘opinion and fact must be clearly distinguishable’ (http://jeb.biologists.org...
Article
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During a parasitological survey of perciform fishes from Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia, we found the following gill monogenoidean species (Platyhelminthes): Euryhaliotrema lizardi n. sp. on Caesio caerulaurea Lacepède, 1801 (Caesionidae) (type host) and Haliotrema weberii n. sp. on Chromis weberi Fowler and Bean, 1928 (Pomacentridae)...
Article
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Synopsis: Studies of animal locomotion and movement largely assume that individuals are healthy and performing to the best of their abilities in ways which are adapted to their survival. However, wild animals face numerous ecological challenges that can compromise their health, reduce their performance capacity, impair their movement abilities and...
Article
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Theoretical models predict that ocean acidification, caused by increased dissolved CO2, will reduce the maximum thermal limits of fishes, thereby increasing their vulnerability to rising ocean temperatures and transient heatwaves. Here, we test this prediction in three species of damselfishes on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Maximum thermal li...
Article
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Predatory reef fishes regularly visit mutualistic cleaner fish (Labroides dimidiatus) to get their ectoparasites removed but show no interest in eating them. The concept of compensated trait loss posits that characters can be lost if a mutualistic relationship reduces the need for a given trait. Thus, selective pressures on escape performance might...
Article
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In a recent Opinion article, Parker et al. [1] highlight a range of important issues and provide tangible solutions to improve transparency in ecology and evolution (E&E). We agree wholeheartedly with their points and encourage the E&E community to heed their advice. However, a key issue remains conspicuously unaddressed: Parker et al. assume that...
Article
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1.Survival depends on appropriate behavioural and physiological responses to danger. In addition to active "fight-flight" defence responses, a passive "freeze-hide" response is adaptive in some contexts. However, the physiological mechanisms determining which individuals choose a given defence response remain poorly understood. 2.We examined the re...
Article
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Respirometry is frequently used to estimate metabolic rates and examine organismal responses to environmental change. Although a range of methodologies exists, it remains unclear whether differences in chamber design and exercise (type and duration) produce comparable results within individuals and whether the most appropriate method differs across...
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Large disturbances can cause rapid degradation of coral reef communities, but what baseline changes in species assemblages occur on undisturbed reefs through time? We surveyed live coral cover, reef fish abundance and fish species richness in 1997 and again in 2007 on 47 fringing patch reefs of varying size and depth at Mersa Bareika, Ras Mohammed...
Article
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Fast-start escape responses are critical behaviours used by fishes during predator-prey encounters and some interactions with hetero- and conspecifics. In experimental studies, escape responses are often measured once per individual and considered representative of maximum performance. However, few studies have compared variability and repeatabilit...
Article
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The relationships among animal form, function and performance are complex, and vary across environments. Therefore, it can be difficult to identify morphological and/or physiological traits responsible for enhancing performance in a given habitat. In fishes, differences in swimming performance across water flow gradients are related to morphologica...
Article
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http://www.esajournals.org/doi/abs/10.1890/14-0426.1 Water flow gradients have been linked to phenotypic differences and swimming performance across a variety of fish assemblages. However, the extent to which water motion shapes patterns of phenotypic divergence within species remains unknown. We tested the generality of the functional relationship...
Article
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Survival depends on escape responses and when to flee a predator. As a result, factors affecting the escape performance of prey species, including parasite infection, may profoundly influence the outcome of predator–prey encounters. Several hypotheses predict the responses of prey to simulated predator attacks based on intrinsic characteristics suc...
Article
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Unsteady water flows are common in nature, yet the swimming performance of fishes is typically evaluated at constant, steady speeds in the laboratory. We examined how cyclic changes in water flow velocity affect the swimming performance and energetics of a labriform swimmer, the shiner surfperch, Cymatogaster aggregata. Using intermittent-flow resp...
Article
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An increasing number of publishers and funding agencies require public data archiving (PDA) in open-access databases. PDA has obvious group benefits for the scientific community, but many researchers are reluctant to share their data publicly because of real or perceived individual costs. Improving participation in PDA will require lowering costs a...
Article
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Wave-driven water flow is a major force structuring marine communities. Species distributions are partly determined by the ability to cope with variation in water flow, such as differences in the assemblage of fish species found in a given water flow environment being linked to swimming ability (based on fin shape and mode of locomotion). It remain...
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http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v502/n7470/full/502171a.html
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http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00265-013-1562-1 Preferential use of one side of the body for cognitive or behavioural tasks (lateralization) is common in many animals, including humans. However, few studies have demonstrated whether lateralization is phenotypically plastic, and varies depending on the ecological context. We studied later...