Dominique Jolivet

Dominique Jolivet
University of Amsterdam | UVA · Department of Political Science and Sociology

MS

About

14
Publications
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54
Citations

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Full-text available
The current economic crisis in Europe is negatively affecting the working and living conditions of migrants and might change the lives and migration aspirations of non-migrants in regions of origin. In times of recession, previously involuntary non-migrants [Carling, J. 2002. “Migration in the Age of Involuntary Immobility: Theoretical Reflections...
Article
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The recent outmigration patterns from Southern Europe since the outbreak of the global economic crisis have interested many migration researchers. Despite their long migration history towards Europe, little is known about the onward migration of the Moroccan‐born, yet this group was one of the most affected by the recession. Furthermore, studies on...
Article
Full-text available
Migration is transformative both for those who move and for the places and economies of source and destination. The global stock of migrants, depending on definition, is approximately 750 million people: to assume that the world is static and that migration is a problem to be managed is inaccurate. Since migration is a major driving force of planet...
Article
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Migration represents a major transformation of the lives of those involved and has been transformative of societies and economies globally. Yet models of sustainability transformations do not effectively incorporate the movement of populations. There is an apparent migration-sustainability paradox: migration plays a role as a driver of unsustainabi...
Article
Full-text available
The welfare aspects of intra-European migration remain an important and controversial topic of academic and political debates. These discussions touch upon the classical 'welfare magnet' or 'welfare tourism' hypothesis. Transcending the politicised concept of 'benefit tourism', our paper examines how welfare-state considerations in relation to migr...
Article
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Little is known on how people’s way of thinking and doing around welfare provision – what we call the welfare habitus – plays a role in migration and how such cultural references change over the migration process. Through an empirical case study on Brazilian migration to Southern Europe, this article explores the dynamism of the welfare habitus foc...
Chapter
This chapter examines feedback, one of the social mechanisms by which migration between localities in one period can affect subsequent migrations, giving rise to rather stable and recurrent patterns of migration. This feedback from earlier migrations is generated by the flow and counter-flow of people, goods, information and ideas in what are often...
Chapter
The team of researchers whose work is presented in this book set out to study ‘the evolution of European migration systems’. But it is not possible to observe, measure or interview a migration system. In fact, as noted in the Introduction, the concept was shrouded with doubts and misgivings, even within the research team, and it seemed an elusive c...
Working Paper
Abstract This paper is based on the findings of the Theorizing the Evolution of European Migration Systems (THEMIS) project, which explores how the migration of people at one point in time affects subsequent patterns of migration to the same area. It focuses on the feedback processes: the social mechanisms that link migration experiences across tim...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
While there is widespread discussion of both sustainability and migration, with the latter focused particularly on the potentially destabilizing impacts of unmanaged movement, there is little understanding on the connections between the two. MISTY migration, transformation, sustainability seeks to explore the ways that migration interacts with sustainability concerns in destination cities, with an emphasis on the unrecognised benefits that it can bring. Drawing on research in Europe, North America, Africa and Asia, the global focus of this project will support the emergence of a more empathetic and evidence-based approach to migration management in cities. While migration is frequently presented in terms of threat or crisis, this research will draw out the substantial opportunities it presents to strengthen urban sustainability. ​Transformation theories assume static populations and fail to recognize both positive and negative impacts of the movement of people. This gap limits explanations and intervention strategies for sustainability. The objective of this project is therefore to use theory and rigorous empirical research to expand knowledge of transformations to sustainability by incorporating migration dynamics. These specifically include: the impact of aggregate flows of people on sustainability; the individual lifecourse dimensions of sustainability; and the governance of migration and sustainability.
Project
The Mobile Welfare project aims to understand the role of welfare systems in destination and origin countries for migration patterns within and towards Europe. The project addresses three research questions: How and to what extent do welfare systems affect mobility patterns in Europe? To what extent and how do perceptions of access to welfare arrangements in origin and destination countries shape migration decisions? What role does transferability of welfare accounts play in mobility across Europe?