Dominiek Coates

Dominiek Coates
University of Technology Sydney | UTS · Faculty of Health

PhD (Sociology)
A/Prof Dominiek Coates is a counsellor, researcher and educator, with 20 years of experience in evidence based practice.

About

79
Publications
27,014
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696
Citations
Introduction
Dr Dominiek Coates is counsellor and social scientist with expertise in working with vulnerable populations, mental health services, women’s health and safety, trauma-informed practice, evidence-based care, research methods, knowledge translation and behaviour change. She has extensive experience leading large research projects across a range of settings, including universities, hospitals, government and community managed organisations.
Additional affiliations
February 2022 - present
Centre for Action on Child Sexual Abuse
Position
  • Executive
February 2020 - January 2022
Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety Limited
Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety Limited
Position
  • Managing Director
January 2018 - present
University of Technology Sydney
Position
  • Research Associate

Publications

Publications (79)
Article
(Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol. 2021;61:106–115) The decision for planned cesarean delivery (CD) is often based on the preferences and beliefs of the patient or clinician. When decision-making is shared, patient satisfaction improves. The extent to which shared decision-making (SDM) occurs in Australia is unclear. Moreover, no studies have directly co...
Article
Actively engaging women in decision-making about their own care is critical to providing woman-centered maternity care. The aim was to understand women's mode-of-birth preferences and shared decision-making experiences during planned cesarean birth (CB). Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 33 women who had planned CB at eight A...
Article
Objective The embedded researcher model proposes that if research is co-produced with academics, clinical staff will have greater engagement with and ownership of the research findings, and they will be able to integrate evidence in practice. This paper describes the role and purpose of embedded researchers in Australian healthcare settings. Metho...
Article
Full-text available
While the value of ethnography in health research is recognized, the extent to which it is used is unclear. The aim of this review was to map the use of ethnography in maternity care, and identify the extent to which the key principles of ethnographies were used or reported. We systematically searched the literature over a 10-year period. Following...
Article
Full-text available
Background Women from migrant and refugee backgrounds who live in high-income countries are at increased risk of adverse perinatal outcomes, including mental health issues, preterm birth and maternal and infant mortality. There is a need to implement and evaluate models of care to meet their specific needs in order to improve health outcomes, their...
Article
Full-text available
Background How the application of evidence to planned birth practices, induction of labour (IOL) and prelabour caesarean (CS), differs between Australian maternity units remains poorly understood. Perceptions of readiness for practice change and resources to implement change in individual units are also unclear. Aim To identify inter-hospital and...
Article
Objective: Variation in practice in relation to indications and timing for both induction of labour (IOL) and planned caesarean section (CS) clearly exists. However, the extent of this variation, and how this variation is explained by clinicians remains unclear. The aim of this study was to map the variation in IOL and planned CS at eight Australia...
Article
Background: The caesarean section (CS) rate is over 25% in many high-income countries, with a substantial minority of CSs occurring in women with low-risk pregnancies. CS decision-making is influenced by clinician and patient beliefs and preferences, and clinical guidelines increasingly stipulate the importance of shared decision-making (SDM). To...
Article
Objective In many high-income countries, approximately half of all births are now planned regarding timing, either by elective Caesarean Section (CS) or induction of labour (IOL). To what degree this is explained by women's birth beliefs and preferences, and in turn, factors such as parity and ethnicity that may influence them, is contentious. With...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Women from migrant and refugee backgrounds who live in high-income countries are at increased risk of adverse perinatal outcomes, including mental health issues, preterm birth and maternal and infant mortality. There is a need to implement and evaluate models of care to meet their specific needs in order to improve health outcomes, their...
Article
In Australia and internationally there is a strong policy commitment to the redesign of health services toward integrated physical and mental health care. When executed well, integrated care has been demonstrated to improve the access to, clinical outcomes from, and quality of care while reducing overtreatment and duplication. Despite the demonstra...
Article
Introduction The global rise in the rate of induction of labor and cesarean birth shows considerable unexplained variation both within and between countries. Prior research suggests that the extent to which women are engaged in the decision‐making process about birth options, such as elective cesarean, induction of labor, or use of fetal monitoring...
Article
Aims and objectives This study explores embedded researcher's age, qualifications, research environment and experience in healthcare and academic organisations in Australia and makes comparisons across three core professional disciplines of nursing and midwifery, medicine and allied health. Background The embedded researcher model, where a researc...
Article
Purpose: The embedded researcher is a healthcare-academic partnership model in which the researcher is engaged as a core member of the healthcare organisation. While this model has potential to support evidence translation, there is a paucity of evidence in relation to the specific challenges and strengths of the model. The aim of this study was t...
Article
Objectives The importance of shared decision-making (SDM) in relation to induction of labour (IOL) is recognised, little is known about women’s experiences of and satisfaction with decision-making and how this can be improved. The aim of this study was to 1) gain insight into women’s experiences of SDM in relation to IOL, 2) understand the factors...
Article
Full-text available
Peer work is a rapidly growing part of the mental health workforce, yet few studies explore the implementation of peer work in youth mental health. Qualitative focus groups were conducted with eight youth peer workers at the commencement of their employment, then at 3-months and 6-months after this time. Data were transcribed verbatim and analysed...
Article
Background Unexplained clinical variation is a major issue in planned birth i.e. induction of labour and planned caesarean section. Aim To map attitudes and knowledge of maternity care professionals regarding indications for planned birth, and assess inter-professional (midwifery versus medical) and intra-professional variation. Methods A custom-...
Article
Full-text available
Background: With around one third of woman having a cesarean birth, better understanding of women's experiences of having a cesarean is vital to improve women's experiences of care. The aim of this review was to gain insight into women's experiences of and satisfaction with cesarean and to identify factors that contribute to women's poor experienc...
Article
Problem and background Approximately one third of women in high-income countries give birth by caesarean section (CS). Better understanding of women’s CS experiences is vital in identifying opportunities to improve women’s experience of care. Aim To identify opportunities for service improvement by investigating Australian women’s experiences of c...
Article
Introduction: To support the development, implementation, and evaluation of shared decision-making (SDM) training programs, this article maps the relevant evidence in terms of training program design and content as well as evaluation outcomes. Method: A systematic scoping review methodology was used. To identify studies, the databases PubMed, Me...
Article
Background Rates of induction of labour have been increasing globally to up to one in three pregnancies in many high-income countries. Although guidelines around induction, and strength of the underlying evidence, vary considerably by indication, shared decision-making is increasingly recognised as key. The aim of this study was to identify women’s...
Article
Full-text available
Pregnant women from migrant and refugee backgrounds living in high‐income countries (HIC) are at increased risk of adverse perinatal outcomes compared with women born in the host country. Women from migrant and refugee background have perinatal healthcare needs that are recognised internationally as a public health priority. The aim of this study w...
Article
Full-text available
Background The proportion of women undergoing induction of labour (IOL) has risen in recent decades, with significant variation within countries and between hospitals. The aim of this study was to review research supporting indications for IOL and determine which indications are supported by evidence and where knowledge gaps exist. Methods A syste...
Article
Background: Comorbid physical and mental health problems are common across the age spectrum. However, services addressing these health concerns are typically siloed and disconnected. Over the past 2 decades efforts have been made to design integrated services to address the physical and mental health needs of the population but little is known abo...
Article
Objective: To map the literature in relation to shared decision making (SDM) for planned caesarean section (CS), particularly women's experiences in receiving the information they need to make informed decisions, their knowledge of the risks and benefits of CS, the experiences and attitudes of clinicians in relation to SDM, and interventions that...
Article
The embedded researcher model is a health-academic partnership where researchers are core members of a healthcare organization, with an aim to support evidence translation. The purpose of this study was to describe the characteristics and experiences of embedded researchers in Australian healthcare settings, and investigate how the model is experie...
Article
Background: The optimal caesarean section rate is estimated to be between 10-15%; however, it is much higher in high and many middle-income countries and continues to be lower in some middle and low-income countries. While a range of factors influence caesarean section rates, women's mode of birth preferences also play a role. The aim of this stud...
Article
Background: There is widespread and some unexplained variation in induction of labour rates between hospitals. Some practice variation may stem from variability in clinical guidelines. This review aimed to identify to what extent induction of labour guidelines provide consistent recommendations in relation to reasons for, and timing of, induction...
Article
Background: There has been a rise in induction of labour over recent decades. There is some tension in the literature in relation to when induction is warranted and when not, with variability between guidelines and practice. Given these tensions, the importance of shared decision-making between clinicians and women is increasingly highlighted as p...
Article
Background: There has been a worldwide rise in planned caesarean sections over recent decades, with significant variations in practice between hospitals and countries. Guidelines are known to influence clinical decision-making and, potentially, unwarranted clinical variation. The aim of this study was to review guidelines for recommendations in re...
Article
Objectives: To identify the prevalence and profile of amphetamine-type-substance-related presentations to the Emergency Department Mental Health Team of a local health district in Australia. Methods: Data was collected from medical records of all amphetamine-type-substance presentations to the Emergency Department Mental Health Team over a 1-yea...
Article
Full-text available
There continues to be call for greater community awareness actions and strategies to reduce stigma and enhance mental health literacy nationally and internationally. To identify local barriers to help-seeking and perceptions around stigma, we developed a ‘mental health attitudes and beliefs’ survey which was administered at a range of community eve...
Article
Perinatal mental health problems are linked to poor outcomes for mothers, babies and families. Despite a recognition of the significance of this issue, women often do not receive the care they need and fall between the gap of maternity and mental health services. To address this, there is a call for reform in the way in which perinatal mental healt...
Article
This article outlines client and service data from an early psychosis service in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, and presents a client and service profile, with a focus on the psychiatric, psychosocial, and physical health profile of young people with early psychosis. Implications for practice are discussed. Client and service data were captured...
Article
Objective: To examine the profile and journey of patients with mental illness in the emergency departments (ED) of a Local Health District in Australia. There is limited evidence around the patient profile and journey of people in who present to EDs with mental illness, and the aim of this study was to inform the development of a psychiatric emerg...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose There has been a significant growth in the employment of peer workers over the past decade in youth and adult mental health settings. Peer work in mental health services for older people is less developed, and there are no existing peer work models for specialist mental health services for older people in Australia. The authors developed a...
Article
Aim There has been a rise in the use of psychotropic medication in young people, despite limited risk-benefit profile of psychotropic medication for this population. Given their side effect profile, the use of psychotropic medications should occur with caution. This study investigated psychotropic prescribing pattern in a public youth community men...
Article
Background: The development of peer work models that are integrated into health systems is at the heart of national and international reform agenda in mental health. Peer work differs from other mental health roles as it is provided by people who have a lived experience of mental illness and recovery and does not assume a medical model. Peer work i...
Article
There is variation in the way mental health services respond to urgent and emergency presentations, with few evidence-based models reported in the literature, and no agreed on best practice models. To inform the development of urgent and emergency psychiatric care models, a literature review was performed. The review sought to identify strengths an...
Article
Aim: Youth participation is central to early intervention policy and quality frameworks. There is good evidence for peer support (individuals with lived experience helping other consumers) and shared decision making (involving consumers in making decisions about their own care) in adult settings. However, youth programs are rarely tested or descri...
Article
The perinatal period is a time of great vulnerability for many women, in particular those with a range of psychosocial vulnerabilities and mental health risk factors. This paper outlines the psychosocial and mental health profile of consumers and their partners of a perinatal and infant mental health (PIMH) service in Australia. To establish the co...
Article
The relationship between parental mental illness and poor outcomes in children is well established. While parents with mental illness could benefit from accessing parenting programs, this population tends to be reluctant to do so. To address this need, we developed an adaptation of the Triple P program specific to people with mental illness, and th...
Article
Purpose The discrepancy between increasing demand and limited resources in public mental health is putting pressure on services to continuously review their practices and develop innovative models of care that redress this discrepancy. To ensure the service models continue to meet the needs of all stakeholders, children and young people’s mental he...
Article
The present study is a review of a cardiometabolic clinic for consumers taking clozapine. This clinic was recently established and co-located with the clozapine clinic at a regional hospital in New South Wales, Australia, to enhance engagement and improve the physical health outcomes of consumers taking antipsychotic medication. A descriptive analy...
Article
Purpose The discrepancy between increasing demand and limited resources in public mental health is putting pressure on services to continuously review their practices and develop innovative models of care that redress this discrepancy. To ensure the service models continue to meet the needs of all stakeholders, children and young people's mental he...
Article
Background: Client feedback is an essential part of service evaluation and can aid both the development and delivery of client-centred services. The current study is an investigation into the experiences of women who have accessed a perinatal infant mental health (PIMH) service. The purpose of the service is to support vulnerable women to connect w...
Article
In mental health settings, feedback from clients and carers is central to service evaluation, development and delivery. Increasingly, client and carer feedback is considered an integral part of service planning, and recognized as a critical element of the provision of recovery oriented service. This paper outlines the findings of a qualitative eval...
Article
Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate a specialised service designed to improve parenting capacity, child safety and family functioning in the context of parental mental health, drug and alcohol and child protection concerns. Method: Client data was collected over a period of 3 years and 3 months, including demographic character...
Article
Full-text available
Youth participation in mental health settings is fundamental to service design and delivery, and is beneficial for the young people as well as the organisation. This paper presents the findings of an evaluation of a youth participation model where tiered participation was attempted in a clinical mental health setting. To inform the ongoing developm...
Article
Child abuse and neglect often occur within the context of multiple risk factors, in particular parental mental health (MH) and/or drug and alcohol (D&A) problems. Interventions aimed at improving parental MH and D&A issues can have a positive impact on children now, as well as in the future. However, implementing sustainable service models that fac...
Article
Full-text available
The ‘dependency inducing practices’, sometimes called ‘brainwashing’, that are commonly alleged to occur in deviant “religious” groups such as a cult movements or new religious movements are not well understood and have promoted considerable debate. There is a general agreement that many of these groups are controlled environments in which conformi...
Article
Child abuse commonly occurs within the context of multiple risk factors, in particular parental mental health and/or drug and alcohol problems. As no one agency can address all these factors, inter-agency collaboration is paramount to the protection of vulnerable children, especially in families with a complex array of problems. This paper outlines...
Article
Almost a quarter of young Australians experience a mental health issue that may become chronic if left untreated. Children and Young People's Mental Health (CYPMH) is a specialist tertiary service for young people with moderate to severe mental health problems on the Central Coast in Australia. This paper presents an overview of client data and ser...
Article
Mental health services in Australia are struggling to recruit and retain adequately qualified and experienced staff. High turnover rates and understaffing is a significant problem faced by mental health services around the world and the most common reason for this is high levels of stress and staff burnout in this field. Mental health workers are a...
Article
Full-text available
Mental health work presents problems for staff over and above those encountered in other organisations, including other areas of healthcare. Healthcare workers, in particular mental health workers, have poorer job satisfaction and higher job burnout and turnover compared with established norms for other occupational groups. To make sense of why hea...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: Despite the high prevalence of mental health problems for young Australians, many do not have ready access to treatment or are reluctant to seek help. Until recently there was a tendency for young Australians to fall between the gap of Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services and Adult Mental Health Services, and this has contribute...
Article
PurposeWhile a number of scholars have observed that the contemporary self has to negotiate a “push and pull” between autonomy and a desire for community (Austin & Gagne, 2008; Bauman, 2001a, p. 60; Coles, 2008; Giddens, 2003, p. 46, the struggle between the “self” and “others” that is at the heart of symbolic interactionist (SI) understandings of...
Article
Challenging the contemporary belief that emotional damage invariably results from new religious movement (NRM) participation, this study shows that membership in and exit from a world-rejecting NRM may initiate the development of increased reflexivity and a personal sense of self for some former members. Out of a sample of 23 former members, 12 par...
Article
Historically, the Australian health system has failed to meet the needs of young people with mental health problems and mental illness. In 2006, New South Wales (NSW) Health allocated considerable funds to the reform agenda of mental health services in NSW to address this inadequacy. Children and Young People's Mental Health (CYPMH), a service that...
Article
Challenging the popular belief that people who join New Religious Movements (NRMs) become ‘entrapped’, the current study describes the way in which 23 former members of 11 different ‘cults’ personally negotiated disaffiliation. The current findings support previous studies that posit exit as a resolution to unresolved doubts and dissonances, and co...
Article
In this paper, Dominiek Coates reports on an investigation into the ways in which membership in a New Religious Movement (NRM) or 'cult' relates to, or impacts upon, the experience and management of issues of self and identity from the perspective of former members before, during and since NRM membership. Qualitative methods were used to investigat...
Article
Full-text available
Challenging the view that people join New Religious Movements because they have fallen victim to powerful brainwashing techniques, the analysis of in-depth life history interviews of 23 former members from 11 different Australian 'cults' suggests that membership was personally negotiated and motivated by a desire for stronger social connections, al...
Article
Full-text available
The current chapter outlines the process through which New Religious Movement (NRM) membership is conceptualized as facilitating the development of increased reflexivity, in particular the development of an increased ability to connect to others. Based on the narratives of a subsample of 11 former members of NRMs for whom membership signified a des...
Article
The current study investigates the experiences of 23 former members of New Religious Movements (NRMs) or cults with anti-cult practices and discourses in Australia. All the participants in this study report some involvement with anti-cult practices and/or engagement with brainwashing explanations of NRM affiliations; however, they describe the sign...
Article
Full-text available
Challenging contemporary discourses of emotional damage from involvement in a new religious movement, or cult, the current study suggests that for many of the participants the experience of membership and exit helped to ameliorate previous vulnerabilities. The analysis of in-depth life history interviews of 23 former members from 11 different group...
Article
Full-text available
The experiences of involvement in a deviant “religious” group such as a cult or new religious movement is not well understood, with few qualitative studies having explored the experiences and perspectives of former members of such groups. To gain a better understanding of what compels individuals to be become committed to a cult or new religious mo...
Article
Full-text available
The current study investigates the construction of self in New Religious Movement (NRM) membership and argues that there is significant variation in the way in which members construct their sense of self. While the majority of the literature suggests that differences in the way in which former members describe and experience NRM membership can be a...
Article
Full-text available
A majority of counsellors and other health professionals who work with former members of charismatic groups appear to give little consideration to pre-involvement variables such as reasons for initially joining the group and corresponding values. This study explores reasons for joining a charismatic group from the perspective of former members thro...
Article
Full-text available
The relationship between childhood abuse and adult mental and physical health problems is well documented. Over the lifespan of victims of child abuse, social, psychological and biological consequences of abuse interact in complex ways. A biopsychosocial model is applied to the experiences of adult victims of child abuse to make sense of the comple...
Article
Full-text available
Many therapeutic models and techniques are used by health professionals in their work with adult survivors of child abuse. But what is ‘effective treatment’ or ‘good practice’ with this population? In order to consider this question, a review of the clinical literature was undertaken. In this review, DOMINIEK COATES identifies, and discusses the ef...
Article
Full-text available
Limited qualitative studies have been conducted with former members of charismatic groups, especially in Australia. The majority of studies with former members have been conducted by psychologists through quantitative methodologies and clinical case studies. Qualitative studies that explore the phenomenon of charismatic group involvement have predo...
Article
This study is a qualitative investigation of ‘adjustment’ as experienced by former members of charismatic groups. In-depth interviews explored participants’ accounts of recovery and adjustment. Six main themes, conceptualised as ‘modalities of adjustment’, resulted from analysis of the transcripts: gradually letting go of the groups’ belief system;...
Article
Full-text available
There has been limited research into the types of customer satisfaction experienced by residents in leisure-oriented retirement communities, particularly in Australia and the United Kingdom. Focus groups were conducted at a series of retirement communities. Results have lead to the development of a typology of retirement community resident satisfac...

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Projects (3)
Project
Women from migrant and refugee backgrounds experience isolation, and are more likely to experience adverse perinatal outcomes. Addressing these health needs is recognised internationally as a public health priority. There is an urgent need to implement and evaluate models of care that improve outcomes, women's experiences of care, and overcome barriers to access. The Cross Cultural Workers (CCW) in Maternity and Child & Family Health Services model of care aims to address this gap. The research will evaluate effectiveness in terms of perinatal outcomes, service user and service provider satisfaction.