Dominic Schmitz

Dominic Schmitz
Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf | HHU · Department of English and American Studies

Master of Arts

About

20
Publications
863
Reads
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13
Citations
Introduction
I am a linguist interested in the psycholinguistic interactions of morphology, phonology and phonetics, in sound symbolism, and in gender-fair language. As research assistant and PhD candidate I am part of the research unit “Spoken Morphology” at Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Germany. I wrote my dissertation on “Production, Perception, and Comprehension of Subphonemic Detail: Word-Final /s/ in English”. Visit https://dominicschmitz.com to learn more.
Additional affiliations
November 2018 - present
Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf
Position
  • Research Assistant
May 2018 - March 2021
University of Cologne
Position
  • Teaching
Description
  • Applied Statistics - Class organized by the Student Council for Linguistics and Phonetics
Education
October 2015 - September 2018
University of Cologne
Field of study
  • Phonetics
April 2014 - August 2014
Sophia University
Field of study
  • Japanese Linguistics
October 2011 - September 2015
University of Cologne
Field of study
  • Linguistics, Phonetics, Japanese Studies

Publications

Publications (20)
Poster
Full-text available
Sound symbolism is a specific form of cross-modal correspondence: Certain sounds become meaningful when they are combined with other sensory information. Prominent types of such sensory information are the rather easily measurable size and the more complex concept of cuteness. However, to date, no combined account of size and cuteness and potential...
Poster
Full-text available
Recent research has shown that seemingly homophonous elements show unexpected effects of morphological structure on their phonetic realisation. For example, word-final /s/ in English is longest as non-morphemic segment, shorter as suffix, and shortest as clitic, e.g. [1], [2]. Such findings highlight the relevance of the debate in language comprehe...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Linguistic research has repeatedly demonstrated that masculine generics in German show a masculine bias (e.g. Gabriel et al., 2008; Gygax et al., 2008; Irmen & Kurovskaja, 2010; Koch, 2021; Misersky et al., 2019; Stahlberg & Sczesny, 2001). That is, grammatically masculine role-nouns such as Anwalt ‘lawyer’ can refer to men and women but may favour...
Poster
Full-text available
In language comprehension research there is a debate on whether, and if so, how, subsegmental information may influence lexical access (e.g. Cho et al., 2007; Christophe et al., 2004; Goldinger, 1996). Recent research on the phonetic realisation of complex words suggests that this debate needs to be extended to the role of subphonemic detail in mor...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recent research has shown that seemingly homophonous elements show unexpected effects of morphological structure. For example, word-final /s/ in English is longest in non-morphemic contexts, shorter with suffixes, and shortest in clitics (e.g. Plag et al., 2017; Schmitz et al., 2021). Such findings raise the question whether listeners are sensitive...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Research of the last two decades has repeatedly shown that masculine generics in German exhibit a masculine bias (e.g. Gabriel et al., 2008; Gygax et al., 2008; Irmen & Kurovskaja, 2010; Koch, 2021; Misersky et al., 2019; Stahlberg & Sczesny, 2001). That is, grammatically masculine role-nouns (e.g. Lehrer, ‘teacher’ / ‘teachers’) can refer to men a...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recent research has shown that phonologically identical morphological entities in English show systematic differences in their phonetic realization. For example, word-final /s/ is longest in non-morphemic contexts, shorter with suffixes, and shortest in clitics (e.g. Plag et al. 2017, Schmitz et al. 2021) and the stems of morphologically complex wo...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In language comprehension research there is a debate whether (or if so, how) subsegmental information may influence lexical access (e.g. Cho et al. 2007, Christophe et al. 2004, Goldinger 1996). Recent evidence from studies investigating the phonetic realization of complex words suggest that this debate needs to be extended to the role of subphonem...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recent research has shown that phonologically identical morphological entities in English show systematic differences in their phonetic realization. For example, stems of morphologically complex words are longer than stems of mono-morphemic words (Engemann & Plag, 2021; Seyfarth et al., 2017), and word-final /s/ is longest as a non-morphemic segmen...
Article
Full-text available
Previous research suggests that different types of word-final /s/ and /z/ (e.g. non-morphemic vs. plural or clitic morpheme) in English show realisational differences in duration. However, there is disagreement on the nature of these differences, as experimental studies have provided evidence for durational differences of the opposite direction as...
Poster
Full-text available
Recent research has shown that phonologically identical morphological entities in English show systematic differences in their phonetic realization. For example, word-final /s/ is longest in non-morphemic contexts, shorter with suffixes, and shortest in clitics (Plag et al., 2017; Schmitz et al., 2020), while stems of morphologically complex words...
Article
Full-text available
Recent research has shown that seemingly identical suffixes such as word-final /s/ in English show systematic differences in their phonetic realizations. Most recently, durational differences between different types of /s/ have been found to also hold for pseudowords: the duration of /s/ is longest in non-morphemic contexts, shorter with suffixes,...
Poster
Full-text available
Recent research suggests homophonous affixes show systematic differences in their phonetic realization (e.g. Ben Hedia & Plag, 2017; Plag et al., 2017; Seyfarth et al., 2017). Such findings pose a challenge for theories of speech production (e.g. Levelt & Wheeldon, 1994; Levelt et al. 1999) because it is unclear how morphological information would...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recent research suggests homophonous affixes show systematic differences in their phonetic realization (e.g. Ben Hedia & Plag, 2017; Plag et al., 2017; Seyfarth et al., 2017). Such findings pose a challenge for theories of speech production (e.g. Levelt & Wheeldon, 1994; Levelt et al. 1999) because it is unclear how morphological information would...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recent research has shown that seemingly identical suffixes such as word-final /s/ in English show systematic differences in their phonetic realization (e.g. Plag et al., 2017; Tomaschek et al., 2019). Most recently, Schmitz et al. (2020) have demonstrated that the durational differences between different types of /s/ also hold for nonce words: the...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Previous research suggests that homophonous affixes show systematic differences in their phonetic realization ([1], [6], [8], [7]). Such findings pose a challenge for theories of speech production ([5], [4]) as it is unclear how morphological information would come to influence articulation. One prominent example is word-final /s/ in English. Previ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recent research suggests homophonous affixes show systematic differences in their phonetic realization (e.g. Ben Hedia & Plag 2017, Seyfarth et al. 2017). Such findings pose a challenge for theories of speech production (e.g. Levelt et al. 1999) because it is unclear how morphological information would come to influence post-lexical stages of speec...
Poster
Full-text available
Recent research suggests that homophonous affixes show systematic differences in their phonetic realization (e.g. Ben Hedia & Plag 2017, Plag et al. 2017, Seyfarth et al. 2017). Such findings pose a challenge for theories of speech production (e.g. Levelt & Wheeldon 1994, Levelt et al. 1999) because it is currently unclear how morphological informa...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recent research suggests that homophonous morphemes show systematic differences in their phonetic realization (e.g. Seyfarth et al. 2017, Plag et al. 2017). Such findings contradict basic assumptions of standard feed-forward theories of morphology-phonology interaction (e.g. Kiparsky 1982) in which morphological information is only available at the...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This study reports on a production experiment investigating acoustic vowel shortening as a function of syllable structure in German. Ten speakers were recorded producing mono- and disyllabic target words differing in vowel quality (low, mid and high vowels) and in the number of coda consonants, that is, the number of consonants following the stress...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
The aim of this project is to take a closer look at how a male bias in generic masculine forms in German comes to be using naive and/or linear discriminative learning.
Project
The project will first test the robustness of the effects of morphological category on segment duration (i.e. word-final /s/ in English, e.g. Plag et al., 2017) with a production study using wug stimuli in carefully controlled phonological and syntactic environments. We then turn to the question of whether the observed differences between different types of /s/ are perceivable and are used in comprehension. This question will be tackled in further experiments using a discrimination task and two listener judgment tasks (using reaction times and mouse-tracking, respectively).