Divya Ramesh

Divya Ramesh
WWF India · Species and Landscapes Programme

Doctor of Philosophy in Biology (Ecology)

About

5
Publications
2,903
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22
Citations
Introduction
I am an ecologist, specifically interested in questions that overlap behavioural ecology and conservation. My research focuses on the use of theory to develop relevant and interesting questions, to innovate and design sound experimental studies, and to disseminate scientific research through peer-reviewed and other publications. Currently, I'm working on various projects including elephant movement and habitat management in the Western Ghats landscape in India.
Additional affiliations
July 2018 - November 2019
Wildlife Institute of India
Position
  • Researcher
August 2013 - May 2018
Indiana State University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Introduction to Biology for non-majors (Lab), Ecology and Evolution for Biology majors (Lab) Principles of Biology I for majors (Lab)
Education
August 2013 - May 2018
Indiana State University
Field of study
  • Ecology and Evolution
June 2009 - June 2011
Saurashtra University
Field of study

Publications

Publications (5)
Article
Full-text available
We model the evolution of a pursuit-deterrent signal of ‘perception advertisement’ for the case in which a predator can travel among many patches, each of which contain two prey. We consider a signal that is difficult for prey to fake, such as approaching the predator, and assume that the signal also alerts other prey in the patch, thereby reducing...
Article
Full-text available
Prey species use pursuit-deterrent signals to discourage an attack, by informing a predator either that the latter has been detected, or that the prey is capable of escaping if attacked. These signals tend to be conspicuous behaviors, such as bobbing, stotting, and predator inspection. Dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis) show prominent tail-flashing...
Article
Full-text available
Population estimates, often difficult to acquire, warrantee the use of an index as an economical substitute for rapid assessments of populations. We estimated population size of the little known social, semi-fossorial Indian desert jird (Meriones hurrianae) in Kachchh, Gujarat, India under closed population capture-mark-recapture (CMR) framework to...

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