Ding Li Yong

Ding Li Yong
BirdLife International · Asia Division

PhD, The Australian National University

About

110
Publications
54,031
Reads
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Citations
Introduction
I am an Asian conservationist interested in birds, biodiversity and the ecology of tropical and temperate Asia. Based in Singapore/Malaysia, I have worked extensively across the region, and have more than 25 years of field experience in tropical Asia. I currently manage several wetland and migratory species conservation projects in Southeast Asia for BirdLife International. More about my non-academic work can be found in my website: dingliyong.wordpress.com
Additional affiliations
September 2016 - February 2017
Arctic Council
Arctic Council
Position
  • Manager
April 2012 - August 2012
National University of Singapore
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Spectrophotometry
January 2010 - August 2010
National University of Singapore
Position
  • Environmental Impact Assessment
Description
  • Bird and amphibian surveys
Education
August 2013 - August 2017
Australian National University
Field of study
  • Applied ecology
August 2008 - July 2009
August 2004 - August 2008
National University of Singapore
Field of study
  • Conservation biology

Publications

Publications (110)
Article
The world’s biomes and their associated ecosystems are artificially fractured by geopolitical boundaries that define countries. Yet ‘transboundary’ landscapes often overlap with biodiversity hotspots, contain surprisingly important ecosystems, and provide critical habitats for threatened species. Notwithstanding, biodiversity in these landscapes is...
Article
Determining the shared responses of different taxa to landscape modification is a key step for identifying which groups of species are good surrogates for other groups. Yet, surprisingly little is known about the spatial processes that drive cross-taxonomic congruence of diversity or how this knowledge can be used to improve the management of modif...
Article
Full-text available
Southeast Asia’s diverse coastal wetlands, which span natural mudflats and mangroves to man-made salt pans, offer critical habitat for many migratory waterbird species in the East Asian-Australasian Flyway. Species dependent on these wetlands include nearly the entire population of the Critically Endangered spoon-billed sandpiper Calidris pygmaea a...
Article
Full-text available
With nearly 400 migratory landbird species, the East Asian Flyway is the most diverse of the world’s flyways. This diversity is a consequence of the varied ecological niches provided by biomes ranging from broadleaf forests to arctic tundra and accentuated by complex biogeographic processes. The distribution and migration ecology of East Asian land...
Article
Full-text available
Hunting for the wild meat trade, medicines and other human uses has decimated Indo-Burma's vertebrate biota and has led to widespread defaunation. Yet, there is surprisingly little data on how hunting impacts wild bird assemblages in different landscapes here. Based on concurrent snapshot surveys of bird hunting, food markets and hunting attitudes...
Preprint
Tropical forest restoration stands to deliver important conservation gains in lowland Southeast Asia, which has suffered some of the world's highest rates of forest degradation and loss. This promise, however, may be undermined by defaunation driven by ubiquitous wildlife trapping in the region, particularly for forest birds that are part of the mu...
Article
Full-text available
Singapore is prominent in the global trade of pet birds, primarily parrots. This includes its role as a key international transit hub, and also its growing domestic market, including for threatened species. There is a need to understand the trade beyond volumes and flows, including consumer knowledge, preferences and behaviours, and interactions wi...
Article
Full-text available
Bako-Buntal Bay in Sarawak, Malaysia is among the most important coastal wetlands for migratory shorebirds in Borneo, and in insular Southeast Asia. However, since the multi-year waterbird surveys of the Sarawak coast during 2010–2012, there has been little published work on migratory shorebirds here. Our study assessed the status and populations o...
Article
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The dramatic rediscovery of Asia's least known bird, the Black-browed Babbler, after an absence of well over 172 years since its description on Borneo.
Article
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The extensive coastline of Sumatra, Indonesia, is known to support internationally significant congregations of migratory waterbirds along the East Asian−Australasian Flyway (EAAF), including multiple globally threatened species such as Nordmann’s Greenshank and Great Knot. Yet, many gaps remain in our knowledge about key shorebird sites on Sumatra...
Chapter
This 381-paged book covers the biology, ecology, impact and management of 34 common alien invasive species, with reviews on the history and context of avian introductions and invasions in five major regions (Oceania, Africa, Europe (including the Middle East, Asia and South America)), as well as management challenges and the potential of citizen sc...
Preprint
The Masked Finfoot Heliopais personatus is among Asia's most threatened waterbird. The species formerly ranged widely across northeast India, Bangladesh and Southeast Asia, but recent records are few. In this review, we aim to address the gaps in knowledge on the conservation status and ecology of the Masked Finfoot by (1) synthesizing recent infor...
Article
Full-text available
The Masked Finfoot Heliopais personatus is among Asia’s most threatened waterbirds. The species formerly ranged widely across north-east India, Bangladesh and South-East Asia, but recent records are few. In this review, we aim to address the gaps in knowledge on the conservation status and ecology of the Masked Finfoot by (1) synthesizing recent in...
Article
Full-text available
The advent of the phylogenomic era has significantly improved our understanding of the evolutionary history and biogeography of Southeast Asia’s diverse avian fauna. However, the taxonomy and phylogenetic relationships of many Southeast Asian birds remain poorly resolved, especially for those with large geographic ranges, which might have experienc...
Article
Full-text available
Details are presented of the first two Indonesian records of the Little Stint Calidris minuta, discovered during shorebird surveys on the north coast of Aceh Province, Sumatra, between 18 October 2019 and 30 January 2020. As the species has already been recorded multiple times in most of the surrounding countries it is assumed that it had hitherto...
Article
Figs have been regarded as keystone plant resources that support diverse tropical vertebrate frugivore communities. Planting or conserving large fig trees, such as stranglers, have therefore been proposed for enhancing urban biodiversity. We compared the diversity and community structure of bird assemblages on strangler figs with non-fig urban tree...
Preprint
The advent of the phylogenomic era has significantly improved our understanding of the evolutionary history and biogeography of Southeast Asia’s diverse avian fauna. However, the taxonomy and phylogenetic relationships of many Southeast Asian birds remain poorly resolved, especially for those with large geographically range, which might have experi...
Chapter
Full-text available
Does the international parrot trade coming through Singapore feed the growth of parrot hobbyists? Link to download - https://www.nss.org.sg/articles/4a430c0d-213-17-NW20Q1ParrotTrade~.pdf
Article
Full-text available
Eleven years ago, BirdingASIA 11 carried an article (Collar & Sykes 2009) highlighting ‘lost’ and highly threatened bird species in OBC’s geographic purview that could be aided through the provisioning of valuable field data by OBC members and the wider ornithological community. The selected species were compiled from Butchart et al. (2005), who re...
Article
Full-text available
South-East Asia’s bird trade is of global conservation concern as it has massively depleted wild populations of many species. Parrots (Order Psittaciformes) are especially vulnerable because they are the most heavily traded group of birds globally under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) appendices. Singapore’s invo...
Article
Full-text available
One of tropical Asia’s most poorly known pheasants, the spectacular Crested Argus Rheinardia ocellata, is known to occur in two disjunct populations—in Vietnam and Laos (nominate subspecies ocellata), and the east-central part of Peninsular Malaysia (subspecies nigrescens). The little-studied Malaysian population, which is almost entirely restricte...
Article
Full-text available
Here we highlight some of the recent collaborative efforts on identifying Helmeted Hornbill population strongholds across the species range.
Book
A survey of the avifauna of Southeast Asia, covering 11 countries, and the key bird conservation sites in each country.
Article
Cross-taxonomic surrogates are often used in conservation planning because inventorying large suites of taxa is either not feasible or too costly. However, cross-taxonomic surrogates are seldom tested rigorously using both correlational and representation-based approaches at the spatial scales at which conservation management occurs. Here, we evalu...
Article
In October 2017, government delegates from 120 countries will convene at the 12th Conference of the Parties of the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species (the Bonn Convention) in Manila, Philippines (CMS 2017). Importantly, this is the first time the conference is held in Asia, the region with the fewest state parties (Caddell 2005). I...
Article
Full-text available
Although urban spaces are increasingly recognised as viable habitats for wildlife, cities remain a major source of anthropogenic mortality for wild birds. While the sources of urban avian mortalities have been well documented in North America, these phenomena remain poorly studied in Southeast Asia, especially for resident species. Here we present...
Article
Full-text available
The first International Peat Congress (IPC) held in the tropics - in Kuching (Malaysia) - brought together over 1000 international peatland scientists and industrial partners from across the world (“International Peat Congress with over 1000 participants!,” 2016). The congress covered all aspects of peatland ecosystems and their management, with a...
Article
The globally threatened Straw-headed Bulbul Pycnonotus zeylanicus is one of South-East Asia’s most imperiled songbirds due to the surging demand for the species in the regional bird trade. Recently uplisted from Vulnerable to Endangered, populations of the Straw-headed Bulbul have been extirpated from Java, Thailand and possibly Sumatra while those...
Article
The Sunda Otter Civet (Cynogale bennettii) is one of the least known of the small carnivore species occuring in the lowland rainforests of the Thai-Malay Peninsula. Threatened primarily by habitat loss and degradation, there are few observations of the species in recent years, the majority being that obtained from camera trap surveys conducted in l...
Thesis
Surrogates of biodiversity are necessary tools for guiding the effective conservation of biodiversity. One of the best known approaches to assessing biodiversity is cross-taxonomic surrogacy, which is underpinned by the hypothesis that selected taxa (i.e. the surrogate) can provide useful and commensurate information on other components of biodiver...
Article
The international wildlife trade has spread numerous species across the planet and reduced populations of many of these same species in their native ranges. In some cases, the intentional or accidental release of traded organisms has led to the establishment of populations beyond their native ranges, in urban centers or adjacent wilderness and ofte...
Article
Full-text available
In birds and mammals, mobbing calls constitute an important form of social information that can attract numerous sympatric species to localized mobbing aggregations. While such a response is thought to reduce the future predation risk for responding species, there is surprisingly little empirical evidence to support this hypothesis. One way to test...
Article
Cross-taxonomic surrogates can be feasible alternatives to direct measurements of biodiversity in conservation if validated with robust data and used with explicit goals. However, few studies of cross-taxonomic surrogates have examined how temporal changes in composition or richness in one taxon can drive variation in concordant patterns of diversi...
Conference Paper
Landscape modification has led to significant loss and degradation of natural habitats worldwide, with associated declines in biodiversity. Despite this, there remains limited knowledge on the diversity patterns of many taxonomic groups across different landscapes and at different spatiotemporal scales, especially for speciose taxa like insects. Di...
Article
Full-text available
The first International Peat Congress (IPC) held in the tropics - in Kuching (Malaysia) - brought together over 1000 international peatland scientists and industrial partners from across the world ("International Peat Congress with over 1000 participants!," 2016). The congress covered all aspects of peatland ecosystems and their management, with a...
Article
Full-text available
Transboundary haze pollution as a result of indiscriminate land clearance by fire has significant health and economic impacts on member states of the Association of South-east Asian Nations (ASEAN). Meanwhile the impact of the associated carbon emissions, ecological disturbance and biodiversity loss extends well beyond South-east Asia. This is desp...
Article
Full-text available
The trade in wild animals involves one third of the world's bird species and thousands of other vertebrate species. While a few species are known to be imperiled as a result of the wildlife trade, the lack of field studies makes it difficult to gauge how serious a threat it is to biodiversity. We combined data on changes in bird abundances across s...
Article
The East Asian-Australasian Flyway supports the greatest diversity and populations of migratory birds globally, as well as the highest number of threatened migratory species of any flyway, including passerines (15 species). However it is also one of the most poorly understood migration systems, and little is known about the populations and ecology...
Article
The winter distribution and ecology of migratory East Asian passerines remains poorly studied, despite increasing habitat loss across their breeding, stopover and wintering areas. The Vulnerable Brown-chested Jungle Flycatcher Rhinomyias brunneata breeds in south-central China and is a long-distance migrant to South-East Asia where the wintering ra...
Article
Full-text available
As more rivers in Southeast Asia’s forested landscapes are dammed, artificial land-bridge islands are becoming more ubiquitous. While the mammal fauna on these islands are poorly studied, they provide unique opportunities to investigate the impacts of fragmentation and isolation on insular biota. During the course of a 60-day survey of small (<20 h...
Article
Full-text available
Malaysian Borneo supports a rich assemblage of five nightbird families, comprising 13 species of owl, six of frogmouth and four of nightjar. Many nightbirds are dependent on forest habitats, but their ecology remains poorly known. Our study examined the relationships between nocturnal bird species richness and environmental variables based on citiz...
Article
Full-text available
The Indonesian island of Sulawesi, a globally important hotspot of avian endemism, has been relatively poorly studied ornithologically, to the extent that several new bird species from the region have been described to science only recently, and others have been observed and photographed, but never before collected or named to science. One of these...
Article
Full-text available
We report for the first time the diversity of known aquatic alien species in the diets of four piscivorous predators in Singapore through a review of published and unpublished studies, and our empirical data. Of 15 aliens identified to the species level, 11 were fish, including the highly invasive tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus [Peters, 1852]). O...
Conference Paper
Until recently, next to nothing was known about the movement of migratory raptors in South-East Asia. Interest in raptor migration biology in the last five years has improved knowledge of routes and migratory populations of raptors in transit through the Indo-Malayan Archipelago, mainly due to citizen-science surveys at migration hotspots in southe...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction On 15 December 2013, a possible Pale-legged Leaf Warbler Phylloscopus tenellipes was observed by KKL on the western edge of Bukit Timah Nature Reserve, Singapore, in tall secondary forest. Subsequent visits found at least two individuals at this location (Plates 1 & 2). The birds were observed foraging on the forest floor and on low sh...