Dinah Baer-Henney

Dinah Baer-Henney
Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf | HHU · Department of Linguistics and Information Science

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34
Publications
2,266
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143
Citations
Citations since 2017
20 Research Items
105 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230510152025

Publications

Publications (34)
Poster
Full-text available
In language comprehension research there is a debate on whether, and if so, how, subsegmental information may influence lexical access (e.g. Cho et al., 2007; Christophe et al., 2004; Goldinger, 1996). Recent research on the phonetic realisation of complex words suggests that this debate needs to be extended to the role of subphonemic detail in mor...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recent research has shown that seemingly homophonous elements show unexpected effects of morphological structure. For example, word-final /s/ in English is longest in non-morphemic contexts, shorter with suffixes, and shortest in clitics (e.g. Plag et al., 2017; Schmitz et al., 2021). Such findings raise the question whether listeners are sensitive...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recent research has shown that phonologically identical morphological entities in English show systematic differences in their phonetic realization. For example, word-final /s/ is longest in non-morphemic contexts, shorter with suffixes, and shortest in clitics (e.g. Plag et al. 2017, Schmitz et al. 2021) and the stems of morphologically complex wo...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In language comprehension research there is a debate whether (or if so, how) subsegmental information may influence lexical access (e.g. Cho et al. 2007, Christophe et al. 2004, Goldinger 1996). Recent evidence from studies investigating the phonetic realization of complex words suggest that this debate needs to be extended to the role of subphonem...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recent research has shown that phonologically identical morphological entities in English show systematic differences in their phonetic realization. For example, stems of morphologically complex words are longer than stems of mono-morphemic words (Engemann & Plag, 2021; Seyfarth et al., 2017), and word-final /s/ is longest as a non-morphemic segmen...
Article
Full-text available
Previous research suggests that different types of word-final /s/ and /z/ (e.g. non-morphemic vs. plural or clitic morpheme) in English show realisational differences in duration. However, there is disagreement on the nature of these differences, as experimental studies have provided evidence for durational differences of the opposite direction as...
Poster
Full-text available
Recent research has shown that phonologically identical morphological entities in English show systematic differences in their phonetic realization. For example, word-final /s/ is longest in non-morphemic contexts, shorter with suffixes, and shortest in clitics (Plag et al., 2017; Schmitz et al., 2020), while stems of morphologically complex words...
Article
Full-text available
Recent research has shown that seemingly identical suffixes such as word-final /s/ in English show systematic differences in their phonetic realizations. Most recently, durational differences between different types of /s/ have been found to also hold for pseudowords: the duration of /s/ is longest in non-morphemic contexts, shorter with suffixes,...
Poster
Full-text available
Recent research suggests homophonous affixes show systematic differences in their phonetic realization (e.g. Ben Hedia & Plag, 2017; Plag et al., 2017; Seyfarth et al., 2017). Such findings pose a challenge for theories of speech production (e.g. Levelt & Wheeldon, 1994; Levelt et al. 1999) because it is unclear how morphological information would...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recent research suggests homophonous affixes show systematic differences in their phonetic realization (e.g. Ben Hedia & Plag, 2017; Plag et al., 2017; Seyfarth et al., 2017). Such findings pose a challenge for theories of speech production (e.g. Levelt & Wheeldon, 1994; Levelt et al. 1999) because it is unclear how morphological information would...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recent research has shown that seemingly identical suffixes such as word-final /s/ in English show systematic differences in their phonetic realization (e.g. Plag et al., 2017; Tomaschek et al., 2019). Most recently, Schmitz et al. (2020) have demonstrated that the durational differences between different types of /s/ also hold for nonce words: the...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Previous research suggests that homophonous affixes show systematic differences in their phonetic realization ([1], [6], [8], [7]). Such findings pose a challenge for theories of speech production ([5], [4]) as it is unclear how morphological information would come to influence articulation. One prominent example is word-final /s/ in English. Previ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recent research suggests homophonous affixes show systematic differences in their phonetic realization (e.g. Ben Hedia & Plag 2017, Seyfarth et al. 2017). Such findings pose a challenge for theories of speech production (e.g. Levelt et al. 1999) because it is unclear how morphological information would come to influence post-lexical stages of speec...
Poster
Full-text available
Recent research suggests that homophonous affixes show systematic differences in their phonetic realization (e.g. Ben Hedia & Plag 2017, Plag et al. 2017, Seyfarth et al. 2017). Such findings pose a challenge for theories of speech production (e.g. Levelt & Wheeldon 1994, Levelt et al. 1999) because it is currently unclear how morphological informa...
Preprint
Artificial language learning research (ALL) has become a popular tool in investigations of language learning. Learning behaviour can be characterised with limited time and effort and bring insights into real language learning. Mechanisms are uncovered and tested, for instance, for universality with learner groups with different L1s. Designing cross...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recent research suggests that homophonous morphemes show systematic differences in their phonetic realization (e.g. Seyfarth et al. 2017, Plag et al. 2017). Such findings contradict basic assumptions of standard feed-forward theories of morphology-phonology interaction (e.g. Kiparsky 1982) in which morphological information is only available at the...
Article
Full-text available
Our understanding of human sound systems is increasingly shaped by experimental studies. What we can learn from a single study, however, is limited. It is of critical importance to evaluate and substantiate existing findings in the literature by directly replicating published studies. Our publication system, however, does not reward direct replicat...
Preprint
Full-text available
Our understanding of human sound systems is increasingly shaped by experimental studies. What we can learn from a single study, however, is limited. It is of critical importance to evaluate and substantiate existing findings in the literature by directly replicating published studies. Our publication system, however, does not reward direct replicat...
Article
Full-text available
Previous research showed that the mental lexicon is organized morphologically, but the evidence was limited to words that differ only in subphonemic detail. We investigated whether word forms that are related through morphology but have a different stem vowel affect each other's processing. We focused on two issues in two auditory lexical decision...
Article
Using the artificial language paradigm, we studied the acquisition of morphophonemic alternations with exceptions by 160 German adult learners. We tested the acquisition of two types of alternations in two regularity conditions while additionally varying length of training. In the first alternation, a vowel harmony, backness of the stem vowel deter...
Article
Full-text available
German nouns may alternate from singular to plural in two different ways. Some singular forms that end in a voiceless obstruent have a plural in which this obstruent is voiced. Another alternation concerns the vowel. Some singular forms with a back vowel have a plural form in which this back vowel is front. For each noun it has to be established in...
Article
Full-text available
German nouns may alternate in two ways: a final word-final voiceless obstruent in the singular may correspond to a voiced one in the plural and a back vowel in the singular may correspond to a front one in the plural. We investigate the role of phonetic motivation and frequency in the acquisition of these alternations. The voicing alternation has a...
Chapter
Do the intuitions of German native speakers concerning the role of the Sonority Sequencing Principle in onset clusters go beyond what they can directly observe in their lexicon, or do their intuitions reflect observable patterns in their lexicon? We addressed this question by means of a rating study involving nonce words, an analysis of onset clust...
Article
We discuss what factors influence the acquisition of morphophonemic alternations. What mech- anisms are available to the learner; what is the basis for grammatical generalizations? Using the Artificial Language Paradigm we compared the acquisition of three alternations differing in pho- netic substance, locality, and amount of exposure: One alterna...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined the effects of competing speech on auditory semantic comprehension using a dichotic sentence-word priming paradigm. Lexical decision performance for target words presented in spoken sentences was compared in strongly and weakly biasing semantic contexts. Targets were either congruent or incongruent with the sentential bias. Sent...
Thesis
The acquisition of phonological alternations consists of many aspects as discussions in the relevant literature show. There are contrary findings about the role of naturalness. A natural process is grounded in phonetics; they are easy to learn, even in second language acquisition when adults have to learn certain processes that do not occur in thei...
Article
Full-text available
Most morphophonological alternations have exceptions. Alternations present the learner with the difficulty that there is is no one to one mapping of form and meaning (van de Vijver and Baer-Henney, 2011; Kerkhoff, 2007); alternations with exceptions are even harder to acquire. For fully regular alternations it has been discussed con-troversially wh...
Article
Full-text available
Simple lexical representations are motivated by economy. Such representations require less storage space, and are easier to retrieve. For children, who have a smaller lexicon, is might be more important, however, to store lexical items with more details mak-ing it easier to connect items with one another. We will show that the latter is more import...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
The project will first test the robustness of the effects of morphological category on segment duration (i.e. word-final /s/ in English, e.g. Plag et al., 2017) with a production study using wug stimuli in carefully controlled phonological and syntactic environments. We then turn to the question of whether the observed differences between different types of /s/ are perceivable and are used in comprehension. This question will be tackled in further experiments using a discrimination task and two listener judgment tasks (using reaction times and mouse-tracking, respectively).
Archived project
Acquisition of Voicing and Vowel Alternations in German