Dina Moustafa

Dina Moustafa
Emory University | EU · Department of Pediatrics

Doctor of Philosophy

About

14
Publications
2,213
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
256
Citations
Additional affiliations
October 2015 - present
Emory University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2013 - December 2013
Emory University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
December 2010 - December 2012
University of Virginia
Position
  • Post doctoral reserach associate

Publications

Publications (14)
Preprint
The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes antibiotic resistant, nosocomial infections in immuno-compromised individuals, and is a high priority for antimicrobial development. Key to pathogenicity in P. aeruginosa are biofilm formation and virulence factor production. Both traits are controlled by the cell-to-cell communication proces...
Article
Lung infections caused by Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and co-infections caused by S. aureus and Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa are challenging to treat, especially with the rise in the number of antibiotic-resistant strains of these pathogens. Bacteriophage (phage) are bacteria-specific viruses that can infect and lyse bacteria, provi...
Article
Full-text available
Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a wide-spread γ-proteobacterium that produces the biosurfactant rhamnolipid that has a great commercial value due to excellent properties of low toxicity and high biodegradability. However, this bacterium is an opportunist pathogen that constitutes an important health hazard due to its production of virulence-associated tr...
Article
Full-text available
Most antimicrobials currently in the clinical pipeline are modifications of existing classes of antibiotics and are considered short-term solutions due to the emergence of resistance. Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents a major challenge for new antimicrobial drug discovery due to its versatile lifestyle, ability to develop resistance to most antibio...
Article
Full-text available
The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. To survive in both the environment and in the host, P. aeruginosa must cope with redox stress. In P. aeruginosa , a primary mechanism for protection from redox stress is the antioxidant glutathione (GSH). GSH is a low molecular weight thiol-co...
Article
Full-text available
Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of life-threatening nosocomial infections. Many virulence factors produced by P. aeruginosa are controlled by the cell-to-cell communication process called quorum sensing (QS). QS depends on the synthesis, release, and groupwide response to extracellular signaling molecules called autoinducers. P. aeruginos...
Article
Full-text available
Author summary Quorum sensing (QS) is a cell-to-cell communication process that bacteria use to coordinate group behaviors. QS is essential for virulence and biofilm formation in many bacteria including the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa has high clinical relevance because it has acquired resistance to commonly used antibiotic...
Article
Full-text available
Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a highly virulent, multidrug-resistant pathogen that causes significant morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients and is particularly devastating in patients with cystic fibrosis. Increasing antibiotic resistance coupled with decreasing numbers of antibiotics in the developmental pipeline demands novel antibacterial...
Article
Full-text available
Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are the etiologic agents of melioidosis and glanders, respectively. These bacteria are highly infectious via the respiratory route and can cause severe and often fatal diseases in humans and animals. Both species are considered potential agents of biological warfare; they are classified as category...
Article
Human brucellosis, a zoonotic disease of major public health concern in several developing countries, is primarily caused by Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis, and Brucella suis. No brucellosis vaccine is available for human use. The aim of this study was to determine if Brucella neotomae, a bacterium not known to cause disease in any host, can...
Article
Full-text available
Brucella neotomae is not known to be associated with clinical disease in any host species. Previous research suggested that B. neotomae might not express detectable levels of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD), a periplasmic enzyme known to be involved in protecting Brucella from oxidative bactericidal effects of host phagocytes. This study was under...
Article
This report describes the resistance of 537 Salmonella typhi isolates identified in Egypt between 1990-1994. Results indicated a high isolation rate for multiple resistant S. typhi (> 71% of isolates collected in 1992-93), particularly to the three standard drug regimens of the clinically relevant antibiotics; ampicillin, chloramphenicol and trimet...
Article
Members of genus Brucella are the causative agent of brucellosis, one of the major public health concerns in several developing countries. The disease has been described as one of the world’s most widespread zoonotic infections. There are six well-recognized and four recently identified species in Brucella genus. B. melitensis , B. suis and B. abor...

Network

Cited By