Dina Lipkind

Dina Lipkind
City University of New York - York College | CUNY · Biology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

34
Publications
3,957
Reads
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916
Citations
Citations since 2017
18 Research Items
459 Citations
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Introduction
Dina Lipkind currently works at the Department of Biology, City University of New York - York College. Dina does research in Neuroscience. Their current project is 'Stepwise acquisition of vocal combinatorial capacity in songbirds and human infants'.

Publications

Publications (34)
Article
Full-text available
Humans and songbirds face a common challenge: acquiring the complex vocal repertoire of their social group. Although humans are thought to be unique in their ability to convey symbolic meaning through speech, speech and birdsong are comparable in their acoustic complexity and the mastery with which the vocalizations of adults are acquired by young...
Article
Culturally transmitted behaviors have an innate foundation, but the detailed sequential structure of such complex, acquired behaviors is often an outcome of historical accidents. New research has identified innate predispositions for structuring vocal sequences in culturally acquired birdsong. Culturally transmitted behaviors have an innate foundat...
Article
Full-text available
While acquiring motor skills, animals transform their plastic motor sequences to match desired targets. However, because both the structure and temporal position of individual gestures are adjustable, the number of possible motor transformations increases exponentially with sequence length. Identifying the optimal transformation towards a given tar...
Article
Full-text available
While acquiring motor skills, animals transform their plastic motor sequences to match desired targets. However, because both the structure and temporal position of individual gestures are adjustable, the number of possible motor transformations increases exponentially with sequence length. Identifying the optimal transformation towards a given tar...
Article
How does an inexperienced young animal acquire proper communication skills that will serve it well as an adult in a complex social environment? Juvenile songbirds acquire their vocal repertoire by imitating songs from adults. But song imitation per se is not the ultimate goal of their vocal development ( 1 ). Birdsong may carry information about sp...
Article
Fixation on learned syllables Zebra finches learn their beautiful songs by listening to other zebra finches. Vallentin et al. observed zebra finch brains as learning proceeded, only to find that inhibition of the neuronal circuits was critical to fixating on learned sequences. For song syllables that have been adequately learned, the inhibitory neu...
Article
Full-text available
Human language, as well as birdsong, relies on the ability to arrange vocal elements in new sequences. However, little is known about the ontogenetic origin of this capacity. Here we track the development of vocal combinatorial capacity in three species of vocal learners, combining an experimental approach in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) wit...
Article
Full-text available
Exploratory variability is essential for sensorimotor learning, but it is not known how and at what timescales it is regulated. We manipulated song learning in zebra finches to experimentally control the requirements for vocal exploration in different parts of their song. We first trained birds to perform a one-syllable song, and once they mastered...
Article
Full-text available
Quantitative analysis of behavior plays an important role in birdsong neuroethology, serving as a common denominator in studies spanning molecular to system-level investigation of sensory-motor conversion, developmental learning, and pattern generation in the brain. In this review, we describe the role of behavioral analysis in facilitating cross-l...
Article
Full-text available
In recent years, a growing need has arisen in different fields for the development of computational systems for automated analysis of large amounts of data (high-throughput). Dealing with nonstandard noise structure and outliers, that could have been detected and corrected in manual analysis, must now be built into the system with the aid of robust...
Article
The demand for replicability of behavioral results across laboratories is viewed as a burden in behavior genetics. We demonstrate how it can become an asset offering a quantitative criterion that guides the design of better ways to describe behavior. Passing the high benchmark dictated by the replicability demand requires less stressful and less re...
Chapter
Rat exploratory behavior includes motor, locomotor, motivational, and cognitive aspects; it consists of a stimulating combination of stochastic and lawful elements. As technology improves, it becomes increasingly more accessible for data acquisition and analysis. This chapter reviews studies relating to the animal's trajectory in the environment an...
Article
Full-text available
Anxiety is a widely studied psychiatric disorder and is thought to be a complex and multidimensional phenomenon. Sensitive behavioral discrimination of animal models of anxiety is crucial for the elucidation of the behavioral components of anxiety and the physiological processes that mediate them. Commonly used behavior paradigms of anxiety usually...
Article
Full-text available
Conventional tests of behavioral phenotyping frequently have difficulties differentiating certain genotypes and replicating these differences across laboratories and protocol conditions. This study explores the hypothesis that automated tests can be designed to quantify ethologically relevant behavior patterns that more readily characterize heritab...
Article
In the open-field behavior of rodents, Software for Exploring Exploration (SEE) can be used for an explicit design of behavioral endpoints with high genotype discrimination and replicability across laboratories. This ability is demonstrated here in the development of a measure for darting behavior. The behavior of two common mouse inbred strains, C...
Article
Many new neurons are added to the adult avian brain. Most of them die 3-5 weeks after they are born (Nature (Lond.) 335 (1988) 353; J. Comp. Neurol 411 (1999) 487). Those that survive replace, numerically, older ones that have died (Neuron 25 (2000) 481). It has been suggested that the new neurons enhance the brain's ability to acquire new long-ter...

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