Dina Madeira Fonseca

Dina Madeira Fonseca
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey | Rutgers · Department of Entomology

PhD, University of Pennsylvania
Professor & Chair, Entomology, Rutgers University; Director, Center for Vector Biology

About

239
Publications
61,942
Reads
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7,154
Citations
Citations since 2017
59 Research Items
4224 Citations
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Introduction
We work on genomics of invasive and emerging species especially disease vectors and agricultural pests. Rapid evolution in invasive species may help understand the effects of Global Climate Change on disease epidemiology. We develop tools to reveal incipient infestations, identify which traits are associated with expansion and damage and optimize management strategies. webpage: https://fonseca-lab.com/
Additional affiliations
July 2017 - July 2017
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Position
  • Managing Director
July 2017 - October 2017
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Position
  • Managing Director
July 2017 - October 2017
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Position
  • Managing Director
Education
September 1989 - May 1996
University of Pennsylvania
Field of study
  • Ecology and Evolution
September 1988 - August 1989
Central Michigan University
Field of study
  • Animal Behavior
October 1981 - June 1986
University of Coimbra
Field of study
  • Biology/Freshwater Ecology

Publications

Publications (239)
Article
Full-text available
Not all exotic species establish and expand aggressively (i.e. become invasive). As potential vectors of disease agents, invasive mosquitoes can have considerable impact on public health, livestock, and wildlife; therefore understanding the species characteristics and ecological circumstances promoting their invasiveness is important. The mosquito...
Article
Full-text available
The intensifying expansion of arboviruses highlights the need for effective invasive Aedes control. While mass-trapping interventions have long been discredited as inefficient compared to insecticide applications, increasing levels of insecticide resistance, and the development of simple affordable traps that target and kill gravid female mosquitoe...
Article
Full-text available
Culex pipiens, an invasive mosquito and vector of West Nile virus in the US, has two morphologically indistinguishable forms that differ dramatically in behavior and physiology. Cx. pipiens form pipiens is primarily a bird-feeding temperate mosquito, while the sub-tropical Cx. pipiens form molestus thrives in sewers and feeds on mammals. Because th...
Article
Full-text available
Projected impacts of climate change on vector-borne disease dynamics must consider many variables relevant to hosts, vectors and pathogens, including how altered environmental characteristics might affect the spatial distributions of vector species. However, many predictive models for vector distributions consider their habitat requirements to be f...
Article
Full-text available
Because biological invasions can be swift and are rarely examined immediately and/or followed over time, spatial genetic diversity analyses grounded in a well-developed body of theory are often used to reconstruct historical patterns of expansion. Unfortunately, the role of selection in shaping and potentially disrupting such reconstructions has se...
Article
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The Asian longhorned tick (Haemaphysalis longicornis) is a vector of multiple arboviral and bacterial pathogens in its native East Asia and expanded distribution in Australasia. This species has both bisexual and parthenogenetic populations that can reach high population densities under favorable conditions. Established populations of parthenogenet...
Article
Full-text available
Forest thinning is a management tool used in the New Jersey Pinelands and elsewhere to improve forest health and resilience, mitigate wildfire risk, and manage for wildlife. Forest thinning leads to warmer drier microclimates, which have been shown in both field and laboratory studies to reduce tick survival and reproduction. To directly assess the...
Article
Full-text available
Background Plasmodium parasites that cause bird malaria occur in all continents except Antarctica and are primarily transmitted by mosquitoes in the genus Culex . Culex quinquefasciatus , the mosquito vector of avian malaria in Hawaiʻi, became established in the islands in the 1820s. While the deadly effects of malaria on endemic bird species have...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding patterns of diversification, genetic exchange, and pesticide resistance in arthropod disease vectors is necessary for effective population management. With the availability of next-generation sequencing technologies, one of the best approaches for surveying such patterns involves the simultaneous genotyping of many samples for a large...
Article
Full-text available
We report the multi-year collection of the Gulf Coast tick, Amblyomma maculatum Koch (Acaridae: Ixodida: Ixodidae) in Staten Island, New York City (NYC) as well as their detection in Brooklyn, NYC, and in Atlantic and Cumberland counties in southern New Jersey, USA. The first and most common detections were of adults, however in Freshkills Park on...
Article
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[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0006845.].
Preprint
Full-text available
Culex quinquefasciatus , the mosquito vector of avian malaria in Hawaiʻi, became established in the islands in the 1820s and the deadly effects of malaria on endemic bird species have been documented for many decades. To evaluate the gene expression response of the mosquito to the parasite, we let the offspring of wild-collected Hawaiian Cx. quinqu...
Article
The soft tick Carios kelleyi (Cooley and Kohls, 1941) is an ectoparasite of bats that can harbor bacteria known to cause disease in humans, such as Rickettsia spp., Bartonella spp., and relapsing fever Borrelia spp. Human-tick encounters may occur when bats occupy attics or similar dwellings with access points to human-inhabited areas. During May 2...
Preprint
Full-text available
We report the multi-year collection of the Gulf Coast tick, Amblyomma maculatum Koch (Acaridae: Ixodida: Ixodidae) in Staten Island, New York City (NYC) as well as their detection in Brooklyn, NYC, and in Atlantic and Cumberland counties in southern NJ, USA. The first detections on all sites were of adults but in Freshkills Park on Staten Island la...
Article
Ixodes scapularis Say is a three-host tick that has been recorded feeding on over 150 different species of terrestrial vertebrates (mammals, birds, and reptiles). This tick is found throughout the northeastern, coastal southeastern, and upper midwestern United States and is considered the most significant vector of tick-borne pathogens to humans in...
Article
Our understanding of how natural selection and demographic processes produce and maintain biological diversity remains limited. However, developments in high-throughput genomic sequencing coupled with new analytical tools and phylogenetic methods now allow detailed analyses of evolutionary patterns in genes and genomes responding to specific demogr...
Preprint
Full-text available
Understanding patterns of diversification, genetic exchange, and pesticide resistance in insect species of human health concern is necessary for effective population reduction and management. With the broad availability of next-generation sequencing technologies, one of the best approaches for surveying such patterns involves the simultaneous genot...
Article
Full-text available
An infestation of cat fleas in a research center led to the detection of two genotypes of Ctenocephalides felis biting humans in New Jersey, USA. The rarer flea genotype had an 83% incidence of Rickettsia asembonensis, a recently described bacterium closely related to R. felis, a known human pathogen. A metagenomics analysis developed in under a we...
Article
The soft tick Carios kelleyi (Cooley and Kohls), a parasite of bats known to occur in at least 29 of the 48 conterminous U.S. states, is here reported from New Jersey for the first time, based on larvae collected from big brown bats, Eptesicus fuscus. Although thought to be widespread in North America, the ecology of C. kelleyi is not well understo...
Article
Established populations of Asian longhorned ticks (ALT), Haemaphysalis longicornis , were first identified in the United States (US) in 2017 by sequencing the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (cox1 ) ‘barcoding’ locus followed by morphological confirmation. Subsequent investigations detected ALT infestations in 12, mostly eastern, US st...
Article
Full-text available
Emerging mosquito-borne viruses like Zika, dengue, and chikungunya pose a major threat to public health, especially in low-income regions of Central and South America, southeast Asia, and the Caribbean. Outbreaks of these diseases are likely to have long-term social and economic consequences due to Zika-induced congenital microcephaly and other com...
Article
For the last decade, the New Jersey (NJ) Department of Health has reported between 42 and 144 new cases each year of "spotted fever group rickettsiosis" (SFGR), a statistic that reflects uncertainty regarding which rickettsial agents (Proteobacteria: Rickettsiaceae: Rickettsia) are infecting NJ residents. To identify the Rickettsia circulating in N...
Article
The use of eDNA surveys to monitor terrestrial species has been relatively limited, with successful implementations still confined to sampling DNA from natural or artificial water bodies and soil. Sampling water for eDNA depends on proximity to or availability of water, whereas eDNA from soil is limited in its spatial scale due to the large quantit...
Article
Full-text available
The past 40 years have seen a dramatic emergence of epidemic arboviral diseases transmitted primarily by mosquitoes. The frequency and magnitude of the epidemics, especially those transmitted by urban Aedes species, have progressively increased over time, accelerating in the past 10 years. To reduce the burden and threat of vector-borne diseases, t...
Article
Aedes albopictus, the Asian tiger mosquito, is an important nuisance mosquito species and known vector of arboviruses such as dengue, chikungunya, and Zika. Despite their cosmopolitan distribution around the world, there is a paucity of accurate predictive models based on rates of development at different temperatures (degree-day models). These typ...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Emerging mosquito-borne viruses like Zika, dengue, and chikungunya pose a major threat to public health, especially in low-income regions of Central and South America, southeast Asia, and the Caribbean. Outbreaks of these diseases are likely to have long-term social and economic consequences due to Zika-induced congenital microcephaly an...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus (Skuse) is an important worldwide invasive species and can be a locally important vector of chikungunya, dengue and, potentially, Zika. This species is native to Southeast Asia where populations thrive in both temperate and tropical climates. A better understanding of the populatio...
Article
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Background The landscape of mosquito-borne disease risk has changed dramatically in recent decades, due to the emergence and reemergence of urban transmission cycles driven by invasive Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus. Insecticide resistance is already widespread in the yellow fever mosquito, Ae. Aegypti; is emerging in the Asian tiger mosquito Ae....
Article
Full-text available
Despite the rising incidence of tick-borne diseases (TBD) in the northeastern United States (US), information and expertise needed to assess risk, inform the public and respond proactively is highly variable across states. Standardized and well-designed tick surveillance by trained personnel can facilitate the development of useful risk maps and he...
Article
Full-text available
Vector control is still our primary intervention for both prevention and mitigation of epidemics of many vector-borne diseases. Efficiently targeting control measures is important since control can involve substantial economic costs. Targeting is not always straightforward, as transmission of vector-borne diseases is affected by various types of ho...
Article
Full-text available
Standardized tick surveillance requires an understanding of which species may be present. After a thorough review of the scientific literature, as well as government documents, and careful evaluation of existing accessioned tick collections (vouchers) in museums and other repositories, we have determined that the verifiable hard tick fauna of New J...
Article
Full-text available
Recent epidemics of mosquito‐borne dengue and Zika viruses demonstrate the urgent need for effective measures to control these diseases. The best method currently available to prevent or reduce the size of outbreaks is to reduce the abundance of their mosquito vectors, but there is little consensus on which mechanisms of control are most effective,...
Article
Full-text available
Until recently, only two haemaphysaline species, Haemaphysalis chordeilis (Packard, 1869) and Haema-physalis leporispalustris (Packard, 1869), were known to occur in the United States, and neither was considered to be of significant medical or veterinary importance. In 2017-2018 established populations of the Asian longhorned tick, Haemaphysalis lo...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Diseases caused by Aedes-borne viruses, such as dengue, Zika, chikungunya, and yellow fever, are emerging and reemerging globally. The causes are multifactorial and include global trade, international travel, urbanisation, water storage practices, lack of resources for intervention, and an inadequate evidence base for the public health...
Article
Full-text available
Haemaphysalis longicornis is a tick indigenous to eastern Asia and an important vector of human and animal disease agents, resulting in such outcomes as human hemorrhagic fever and reduction of production in dairy cattle by 25%. H. longicornis was discovered on a sheep in New Jersey in August 2017 (1). This was the first detection in the United Sta...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract The worldwide spread of invasive Aedes mosquitoes and arboviral disease, have renewed the pressure for effective and sustainable urban mosquito control. We report on the success of a model we are confident will usher in a new era of urban mosquito control. The key innovation is the mobilization of neighbors guided by scientific advisors, a...
Article
Full-text available
BACKGROUND Given the lack of vaccines for most vector‐borne diseases, vector control is often the primary option for disease control. Aedes albopictus are difficult to control because the immatures primarily develop in containers ubiquitous in residential properties. Conventional adulticide campaigns often result in brief, rebounding population dec...
Article
Full-text available
The historically southeastern mosquito species Culex erraticus has over the last 30 years undergone a marked expansion north. We evaluated this species’ potential to participate in local disease cycles in the northeastern USA by identifying the vertebrate sources of blood in Cx. erraticus specimens from New Jersey. We found that the majority of blo...
Article
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Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae) have a global distribution and are the primary vector of a number of mosquito-borne viruses responsible for epidemics throughout the Americas. As in much of South America, the threat from pathogens including dengue virus (DENV; Flaviviridae, Flavivirus) and chikungunya virus (CHIKV; Togaviridae, Alphavirus) h...
Article
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The number of exotic species invasions has increased over recent decades, as have the ecological harm and economic burdens they impose. Rapid‐response eradication of nascent exotic populations is a viable approach to minimizing damage, but implementation is limited by the difficulty of detecting such species during the early stages of infestation d...
Article
Full-text available
There is increasing evidence that exotic populations may rapidly differentiate from those in their native range and that differences also arise among populations within the exotic range. Using morphological and DNA‐based analyses, we document the extent of trait divergence among native North American and exotic Hawaiian populations of northern card...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Temperate urban landscapes support persistent and growing populations of Culex and Aedes mosquito vectors. Large urban mosquito populations can represent a significant risk for transmission of emergent arboviral infection. However, even large mosquito populations are only a risk to the animals they bite. The purpose of this study is to...
Article
Full-text available
Human mediated transportation into novel habitats is a prerequisite for the establishment of non-native species that become invasive, so knowledge of common sources may allow prevention. The brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB, Halyomorpha halys) is an East Asian species now established across North America and Europe, that in the Eastern United State...
Article
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With the emergence or re-emergence of numerous mosquito-borne diseases in recent years, effective methods for emergency vector control responses are necessary to reduce human infections. Current vector control practices often vary significantly between different jurisdictions, and are executed independently and at different spatial scales. Various...
Article
Vector-borne disease transmission is often typified by highly focal transmission and influenced by movement of hosts and vectors across different scales. The ecological and environmental conditions (including those created by humans through vector control programmes) that result in metapopulation dynamics remain poorly understood. The development o...
Article
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Vector-borne diseases transmitted by insect vectors such as mosquitoes occur in over 100 countries and affect almost half of the world’s population. Dengue is currently the most prevalent arboviral disease but chikungunya, Zika and yellow fever show increasing prevalence and severity. Vector control, mainly by the use of insecticides, play a key ro...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive insect pests cost the agricultural industry billions of dollars annually in crop losses. Timely detection of pests is critical for management efficiency. Innovative pest detection strategies, such as environmental DNA (eDNA) techniques, combined with efficient predators , maximize sampling resolution across space and time and may improve s...
Data
Real-time PCR results for pooled guano samples, and corresponding weekly Halyomorpha halys densities, collected in fruit tree orchards in New Jersey, USA, 2013. (DOC)
Article
Full-text available
Lyme disease is a major vector-borne bacterial disease in the USA. The disease is caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, and transmitted among hosts and humans, primarily by blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis). The ~25 B. burgdorferi genotypes, based on genotypic variation of their outer surface protein C (ospC), can be phenotypically separated as strai...
Data
Example of a Site-Specific Partition of the Full Dataset for the Bayesian Analyses. Data from all 14 tested ticks sampled from site 602 (i = 2) in 2006 are presented. Rows are sorted according to the observed presence/absence of infection (zij), observed success/failure of RLB test (vij) if zij = 1 (otherwise "NA" for "not applicable"), and observe...
Data
Integrative Bayesian GLMs. (PDF)
Data
Data (workbook of multiple spreadsheets). (XLS)
Data
Covariate Transformation. (PDF)
Data
Computer Implementation for Analysis of 2009 Data (R dynamic document). (HTML)
Data
Host Activity Density Categories. Activity densities assigned to each host species in the community. Densities for the white-footed mouse, eastern chipmunks, short-tailed shrew, and birds were measured directly. (PDF)
Article
Full-text available
Culex pipiens L., the northern house mosquito, is the primary vector of West Nile virus to humans along the east coast of North America and thus the focus of much study. This species is an urban container-breeding mosquito whose close contact with humans and flexibility in host choice has led to its classification as a “bridge vector”; that is, it...
Article
Full-text available
Adult control of Aedes albopictus via ultra-low volume is difficult because this species occurs primarily in peridomestic habitats where obstacles such as buildings and vegetation can disrupt spray plumes and droplet dispersion. We determined droplet penetration and characterization of a pyrethroid adulticide applied from the ground at mid (46.77 m...