Dimitria Groutsis

Dimitria Groutsis
The University of Sydney · Discipline of Work and Organisational Studies

About

47
Publications
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Introduction

Publications

Publications (47)
Article
This article examines how the interaction of migrant agency and policy arrangements influence different forms of regulated temporariness in Australia’s temporary migration regime. It analyses regulated temporariness under the temporary skilled visa, the Seasonal Workers Program, working holidaymaker visa and international student visa schemes. The...
Article
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Populism in Germany is not a new phenomenon. For a long time, the alleged integration problems of Turkish workers in Germany have been at the center of the dominant discourse and academic studies. This paper demonstrates how ‘symbolic violence’ as collective habitus frames the human capital of Turks as deficient, a phenomenon which has prevailed ev...
Article
Australia today remains a continent adrift in a rapidly transforming world. It is economically dependent on China, aligned militarily with the US and yet socio-culturally still profoundly European in outlook. In this article, we reflect on the trends, challenges and opportunities that are likely to define and redefine Australia's interaction with E...
Article
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Human Resource (HR) algorithms are now widely used for decision making in the field of HR. In this paper, we examine how biases may become entrenched in HR algorithms, which are often designed without consultation with HR specialists , assumed to operate with scientific objectivity and often viewed as instruments beyond scrutiny. Using three orient...
Research
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The Who Gets To Tell Australian Stories? report is the first comprehensive picture of who tells, frames and produces stories in Australian television news and current affairs. It details the experience and the extent of inclusion and representation of culturally diverse news and current affairs presenters, commentators and reporters. It is also th...
Article
This article builds on the growing literature on migrant worker mobilisation by analysing how the temporary migrant workforce, employed in food production, interacts with two Australian trade unions alongside ethno-specific social media groups, offshore unions and community/religious organisations. The contribution of this article is twofold. First...
Article
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This article examines the ‘new’ migration for work phenomenon gripping Southern Europe since the Global Financial Crisis struck in 2008, by focusing on the case of skilled Greeks migrating to Germany for work purposes. In applying Honneth’s concept of emancipation to the domain of work, the article frames emancipation as a phenomenon which emerges...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This is the first background report of a three-year project, which looks at the Syrian and Iraqi refugee settlement outcomes in Australia, with a focus on English language competency, education and employment using a policy network analysis with a place-based focus, locating the family unit at the centre of our analysis. The three-year study of 200...
Article
Full-text available
International students can be a source of skilled workers for many industrialized countries with an aging population. However, it is unclear if international students would stay after completing their studies, given booming economies in their home countries. The present paper explores the decision processes international students make when contempl...
Chapter
Most publications on the management of diversity in Western countries pay homage to history by referring back to the way regulatory frameworks developed to promote equal treatment and to oppose discrimination. In work on English speaking countries, particular attention has been given to the struggles waged in the USA for civil rights and for gender...
Article
Governments have increasingly commercialised their migration services, which has fuelled a mushrooming migration industry creating a ripe context for the central role of migration intermediaries. It is therefore timely to explore the new actors responsible for shaping contemporary flows of skilled migration. Drawing on the work of existing studies...
Article
Full-text available
For governments concerned with enhancing labour market efficiency, employer-sponsored temporary labour migration schemes have become increasingly popular. However, the equity implications of these arrangements, which constrain the mobility of migrant workers, have largely been ignored. This paper assesses the factors affecting the vulnerability of...
Article
Discussion of skilled migration often focuses on skill shortages and global labour market trends, with little attention directed to the individual experiences of the migrants themselves. ?Divina? is a migrant nurse who left her home country of the Philippines to gain work in Australia. In the process of this migration, Divina was drawn into a compl...
Article
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the Gender and Diversity Stream, Standing Working Group (SWG) at the recent European Group of Organisational Studies (EGOS) Colloquium, which was hosted in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. The paper provides an overview of the SWG before turning to the scope of the papers and a brief synop...
Article
The traditional stronghold of medical dominance, and thus the construction of the medical labour market, has been challenged by a number of contemporary trends. While the social, economic and cultural trends driving this shift have been explored, the significance of geography as a key determinant in the construction of the medical labour market has...
Chapter
Full-text available
International Human Resource Management - edited by Mustafa F. Özbilgin March 2014
Chapter
International Human Resource Management - edited by Mustafa F. Özbilgin March 2014
Chapter
International Human Resource Management - edited by Mustafa F. Özbilgin March 2014
Article
Our paper analyses and explains the migration decision and labour market experience of migrant elites, by drawing on the case of South African-trained doctors in Australia. In doing so, we expand on the limited conceptualisation of skilled migration to which we offer a different interpretation by drawing on a multi-scale and integrated model of ana...
Chapter
Full-text available
The purpose of this chapter is to theorise the experience of minority ethnic elites in their host countries. We frame the notion of ‘minority ethnic elite’ as workers who possess high levels of education and who sometimes are able to gain access to elite forms of professional education and employment. We also demonstrate that the link between their...
Article
From its foundation in 1919, the International Labour Organisation's (ILO) guiding principle has been that labour is not a commodity. Following an examination of the origins and impact of this principle on ILO and United Nations (UN) conventions relating to migrant workers, the paper examines how Australia has responded to such conventions. In this...
Article
The study examines the complex and stratified nature of the health care profession in Greece, which is increasingly staffed and thus shaped by female migrants. The research explores how immigrant labour is drawn on to fill the most urgent needs in the lower end of the nursing care sector, how immigrant labour gains access to these jobs, the implica...
Article
This research examines the process of labour market entry for foreign‐trained non‐Greek national women in Greece as a means by which to understand the key factors shaping entry portals. In doing so, the paper assesses the influence of pre‐migration skills, qualifications and vocational experience (human capital); and the role played by one’s local...
Article
Labour mobility is spatially defined both in the country of emigration and in the host or receiving country. That is, migration decisions are influenced by where people are already located in their own labour markets as well as where they think they will be located in the new country. A range of factors including cultural or human capital (or skill...
Article
Full-text available
Books Reviewed: Anne McBride, Gender Democracy In Trade Unions Peter Dawkins and Craig Littler, (eds) Downsizing: Is it Working for Australia? Emma Wallis, Industrial Relations in the Privatised Coal Industry: Continuity, Change and Contradictions Jack Eaton, Globalization and Human Resource Management in the Airline Industry Anna Green, British Ca...

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Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
In 2017 the number of refugees arriving in Australia effectively doubled the intake of previous decades. This is because most of the special one-off intake of 12,000 Syrian Conflict refugees that was announced by Prime Minister Abbott in 2015 in fact arrived in 2017. In addition, the annual intake of humanitarian entrants was increased to 16,250 in 2017-18. Most of these newly-arrived refugee families settled in NSW, Victoria and Queensland. As part of a study on Settlement Outcomes of Refugee Families in Australia, funded by the Australian Research Council, and led by Professor Jock Collins (University of Technology Sydney), Professor Carol Reid (Western Sydney University), and Associate Professor Dimitria Groutsis (University of Sydney), the first of three years of data collection has been completed. With the assistance of partners in the project, we interviewed and surveyed newly arrived refugee families from Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan, in metropolitan and regional locations in two states: New South Wales, partnered with Settlement Services International; and Queensland, partnered with Multicultural Development Australia Ltd, and Access Community Services. AMES Australia, a further partner in the research, interviewed and surveyed newly arrived refugee families from Syria and Iraq, in metropolitan Melbourne and in regional Shepparton, Victoria.
Project
CALL FOR CHAPTER PROPOSALS Proposal Submission Deadline: 1st of November 2017 Book title (For Emerald publisher: Social Solidarity in Practice for Equality, Diversity, and Inclusion A book edited by: Dimitria Groutsis, University of Sydney Business School, University of Sydney Australia Olivia Kyriakidou (Athens University of Economics and Business, Greece) Joana Vassilopoulou (Brunel Business School, Brunel University London, UK) Mustafa Ozbilgin (Brunel Business School, Brunel University London, UK) Topic of the book It is no coincidence that the concept of solidarity is returning to the center of social debates in many Western European countries. Society and organizations are becoming more diverse owing to, among other factors, increased cross-border mobility and international migration, less-rigid gender roles and processes of individualization. Such diversity together with neoliberal economic restructuring have created a situation of socio-political turmoil not dissimilar from the historical conditions under which the modern concept of solidarity emerged. Although the effects of social change on solidarity are always politically mediated – and therefore, vary significantly between countries – the Europe-wide debates on the ‘failure of multiculturalism’ testify to the declining support for solidarity mechanisms under conditions of growing ethnic and cultural diversity. Moreover, the diversity of lifestyles, value systems and experiences has consequences for social solidarity, and the self-conception and internal integration of societies and organizations. However, its precise impact is in many ways unclear. Intensified and fine-grained research is urgently needed as the effects of diversity are often the subject of controversial political agendas and debates. In response, this edited volume explores innovative forms of solidarity emerging under conditions of increasing diversity. To date, knowledge about the factors that affect the capacity of societies and organizations to constructively use the potential arising from increasing diversity, and about how individuals, social groups, organizations and societies deal with diversity, is limited. Our basic assumption is that classic conceptualizations of solidarity remain relevant, but need to be rethought to match rapidly changing societal conditions. We believe that the study and practice of solidarity is performative in that it fosters our understanding of the potentialities of alternatives within and beyond the current economic system. The book hopes to include chapters that approach solidarity in terms of the actual interpersonal and relational practices of those diverse individuals present in a particular location. Such practices have the capacity to redefine communities and provide the foundations for new and innovative forms of solidarity. Understanding the relational practices of diverse people as acts of citizenship could move us towards a political understanding of community where community is not conceived only in terms of cohesive social relationships, but primarily in terms of whether issues of social justice, such as material redistribution, political representation and cultural recognition, can be raised and made visible. Solidarity for equality, diversity and inclusion is strongly related to social interactions being performed in specific contexts without ignoring the discursive aspects of space as an identity resource and as a fundamental facet of ‘lived lives’. Space constitutes a dynamic resource that is both active and activated in body performances that have implications for how individuals interact with others and develop their solidarity and how lives of inclusion and exclusion are drawn and maintained. Space thus carries meanings (e.g. around gender, around sexuality, around solidarity) that are continually brought into existence by the relative practices of individuals within them. Accordingly, this book will include chapters that will try to understand how coalitions, solidarities, belongings and separations are experienced by drawing on spatial aspects and how space is implicated in the management of diverse identities and the de-/construction of heteronormative societal conditions. Moreover, the book hopes to include chapters that explore the politics of diversity. In other words, it is argued that if we want to advance knowledge regarding social solidarity for equality, diversity and inclusion we need to explore the political and contested nature of workforce diversity and the management of it. Solidarity for equality, diversity and inclusion will also be explored from the lens of international mobility. The book will include chapters that explore the many and varied issues around solidarity and equality, diversity and inclusion that people face when moving from one country to another. One of the most important manifestations of globalization is increasing international mobility. Prevailing motives for workers to migrate internationally are better employment opportunities and the eternal hope for improved economic and social well-being. There are, however, other reasons for international mobility, such as study abroad, becoming a refugee, a political asylum seeker or a self-initiated expatriate. These less explored aspects are overlooked in the broader international mobility literature. Accordingly, this book will explore a number of issues related to either work or non-work situations or contexts at societal, organizational and/or individual levels in order to deliver improved equality, diversity, inclusion and solidarity outcomes for internationally mobile people. The book also invites chapters that address the fundamental question of whether solidarity transforms the existing social structures or is geared towards integration in the existing social structures. It will seek chapters that develop innovative insights in the way alternative economies produce and reproduce alternative organizational alternatives for experiencing new forms of ownerships, funding, decision-making, leadership and communication. Lastly, the book hopes to include empirical chapters which present forms of solidarity for diversity, equality and inclusion, involving social cooperatives, grass-roots movements, NGOs, trade unions, diversity and human rights advocates, policy makers, etc. Topics for chapters The book will include chapters which explore forms of solidarity emerging under conditions of increasing diversity. The book will welcome theoretical and empirical chapters on the following areas: a) Solidarity and the relational practices of diverse individuals b) Coalitions, space and solidarity in a heteronormative society c) The politics of diversity d) Social solidarity and international mobility e) Transformational or integrational social solidarity for diversity f) Intersectional solidarity for diversity, equality and inclusion g) Emancipatory forms of organizing for social solidarity in the workplace The book also welcomes theoretical/empirical chapters, which explore forms of solidarity emerging from the work and practices of trade unions, social corporates, grass-roots movements, NGOs, policy makers, diversity and human rights advocates, etc. Finally, the book invites comparative chapters as well as single country cases, which highlight the impact of the context of the respective country or countries on how solidarity has been expressed under conditions of increasing diversity. Important Dates: 1st November 2017: Proposal Submission Deadline 1st March 2018: Chapter submission 1st May 2018: Authors will receive feedback. 1st July 2018: Full chapters with first revisions due. 15th September 2018: Full chapters due. Submission Procedure: Researchers and practitioners are invited to submit on or before 1st of November 2016, a chapter proposal of 1,000 to 2,000 words clearly explaining the mission and concerns of his or her proposed chapter. Authors will be notified by 30th of November 2016 about the status of their proposals and sent chapter guidelines. Full chapters are expected to be submitted by 1st March 2018. For manuscript submissions all interested authors must consult the Emerald Author Guidelines at: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/ebookseries/author_guidelines.htm and Best Practice Guidelines at: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/authors/writing/best_practice_guide.htm   Prior to submission. All submitted chapters will be reviewed on a double-blind review basis. Contributors may also be requested to serve as reviewers for this project. Note: All manuscripts are accepted based on a double-blind peer review editorial process. ⇒ For the list of the contributors, please institution affiliation, up-to-date email address and postal address. ⇒ Please provide a biography of no more than 150 words for the about the Authors section. ⇒ When totalling pagination we work on the average of 390 words per page and two tables/figures per page. Please take tables and figures into account when working towards a word limit. ⇒ Each chapter must include an abstract.   ⇒ Permissions must be sought by the authors for any third-party materials to be reproduced (Please find the permissions request form template and permissions checklist attached). ⇒ **Please note that it is the authors' responsibility to obtain permission for all 3rd party material to be reproduced (e.g. copyrighted figures, tables, long quotations, etc.) and that this should be obtained prior to submission of the volume.** ⇒ A Chapter Transfer Agreement Form for each chapter of the book which must be completed with all author details and signed by the lead contributor (Please find the template attached). I have attached the form that will mostly be used, however we also have a non-exclusive form and a exclusive form. The Chapter Transfer Agreement is when the author assigns copyright to Emerald and the paper can be fully disseminated. Exclusive means that Emerald are the first publisher to produce this work but the author cannot sign the copyright form due to funding or employment restrictions. Non-exclusive would be if Emerald are republishing a paper from another Publisher or a translation. For the exclusive and the non-exclusive licences there may be dissemination restrictions due to the nature of these licences. These are all available in PDF and in Word. If you require the other forms please let me know and I can send these to you. Just to clarify that we need a signed form for each chapter and it must be hand signed by the lead author. However, it must contain the contact details for all the authors of that chapter, in order for all contributors to receive their complimentary copy of the book upon publication. Please forward Inquiries to: Dr Dimitria Groutsis, University of Sydney Business School, University of Sydney Australia dimitria.groutsis@sydney.edu.au
Project
This project examines collective responses which have emerged following the rapid growth in temporary migrant workers in Australia. We will look at union responses, as well as collective responses by temporary migrant workers that have evolved outside of traditional union structured.