Dimitri Ponirakis

Dimitri Ponirakis
Cornell University | CU · Bioacoustics Research Program

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22
Publications
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1,128
Citations

Publications

Publications (22)
Article
Full-text available
Understanding relationships between physical drivers and biological response is central to advancing ecological knowledge. Wind is the physical forcing mechanism in coastal upwelling systems, however lags between wind input and biological responses are seldom quantified for marine predators. Lags were examined between wind at an upwelling source, d...
Article
Full-text available
Vessel-generated underwater noise can affect humpback whales, harbor seals, and other marine mammals by decreasing the distance over which they can communicate and detect predators and prey. Emerging analytical methods allow marine protected area managers to use biologically relevant metrics to assess vessel noise in the dominant frequency bands us...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic noise negatively impacts many species. One of the more insidious effects of elevated noise levels is the reduction in area over which animals are able to acoustically communicate, often termed communication masking. This study utilizes modeling approaches to evaluate relative levels of masking for 4 baleen whale species from the combi...
Article
Full-text available
The Gulf of Mexico ecosystem represents the intersection between high marine biodiversity and extensive human use and impact. Anthropogenic marine activities are prominent in the Gulf, prompting concern regarding impacts of chronic elevated noise throughout the marine ecosystem. Since sound is a critical component of the marine environment and many...
Article
Full-text available
This work presents a new toolkit for describing the acoustic properties of the ocean environment before, during and after a sound event caused by an underwater seismic air-gun. The toolkit uses existing sound measures, but uniquely applies these to capture the early time period (actual pulse) and late time period (reverberation and multiple arrival...
Article
In September and October 2011, a seismic survey took place in Baffin Bay, Western Greenland, in close proximity to a marine protected area (MPA). As part of the mitigation effort, five bottom-mounted marine acoustic recording units (MARUs) collected data that were used for the purpose of measuring temporal and spectral features from each impulsive...
Article
Bowhead whales, Balaena mysticetus, in the Bering-Chukchi-Beaufort (BCB) population, experience a variable acoustic environment among the regions they inhabit throughout the year. A total of 41,698 hours of acoustic data were recorded from 1 August 2009 through 4 October 2010 at 20 sites spread along a 2300 km transect from the Bering Sea to the so...
Article
Full-text available
Habitat loss is a leading cause of biodiversity loss in terrestrial ecosystems. For marine species that rely on acoustic cues to navigate, find food or select mates, sound is a key element of their environment. Chronic forms of human-generated ocean noise have the potential to mask communication signals over substantial fractions of their functiona...
Article
Full-text available
The effects of chronic exposure to increasing levels of human-induced underwater noise on marine animal populations reliant on sound for communication are poorly understood. We sought to further develop methods of quantifying the effects of communication masking associated with human-induced sound on contact-calling North Atlantic right whales (Eub...
Article
Whales, dolphins, and porpoises (cetaceans) are adapted to produce and perceive sounds that collectively span 4-6 orders of magnitude along space, time, and frequency dimensions. Two important concepts, acoustic ecology and acoustic habitat, emerge from this perspective: where acoustic ecology is the study of acoustics involved in interactions of l...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The possible effects of anthropogenic noise on the marine environment is becoming an important topic in the oceanic community. The exploration for fossil-fuel or alternative energy and the construction of facilities to support these endeavors often requires sizable construction efforts; which usually require permitting to study the impact of noise...
Article
Recordings for marine mammals were collected in the Chukchi Sea in the 2006 and 2008 summer-fall seasons in proximity to seismic exploration activities. 2006 data were from MARUs off Cape Lisburne, Pt. Lay, Wainwright, and Pt. Barrow, AK. 2008 data were from MARUs in the Burger and Klondike areas. In 2006, belugas, but no bowheads, were rarely dete...
Article
Acoustic masking from anthropogenic noise is increasingly being considered as a threat to marine mammals, particularly low-frequency specialists such as baleen whales. Low-frequency ocean noise has increased in recent decades, often in habitats with seasonally resident populations of marine mammals, raising concerns that noise chronically influence...
Article
Full-text available
In 2006, we used the U.S. Coast Guard's Automatic Identification System (AIS) to describe patterns of large commercial ship traffic within a U.S. National Marine Sanctuary located off the coast of Massachusetts. We found that 541 large commercial vessels transited the greater sanctuary 3413 times during the year. Cargo ships, tankers, and tug/tows...
Article
Data from two acoustic monitoring networks operating off New England in an area frequented by whales reveal acoustic features of those habitats. These seafloor and moored systems continuously sample the acoustic environment, and resultant data provide mechanisms for mapping, quantifying, and describing the spatio-spectral-temporal variability of th...
Article
Full-text available
In 2006, we used the U.S. Coast Guard's Automatic Identification System (AIS) to describe patterns of large commercial ship traffic within a U.S. National Marine Sanctuary located off the coast of Massachusetts. We found that 541 large commercial vessels transited the greater sanctuary 3413 times during the year. Cargo ships, tankers, and tug/tows...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding and mitigating the effects of underwater noise on marine species requires substantial information regarding acoustic contributions from shipping. In 2006, we used the U.S. Coast Guard's Automatic Identification System (AIS) to describe patterns of large commercial ship traffic within a U.S. National Marine Sanctuary. AIS data were com...
Article
Large whales communicate primarily in the low (<1000 Hz) frequency bands; the same frequency range within which anthropogenic ocean noise has been increasing over the last half century at approximately 3-5 dBdecade. The working assumption and hypothesis hold that rising ambient noise levels negatively impact whales by interfering with communication...
Article
The North Atlantic right whale is a highly endangered species of baleen whale. Acoustic communication plays an important role in the social behavior of these whales. Right whales are found in coastal waters along the east coast of the United States, an area characterized by high levels of human activity. Most of these activities generatenoise that...
Article
Full-text available
Acoustic masking from anthropogenic sound sources is recognized as a potential threat to low- frequency specialists such as the baleen whales. Masking from chronic noise sources has been difficult to quantify and measure at both the individual and population levels. There is evidence for increases in low-frequency ocean noise and sound clutter, oft...

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Projects (2)