Dieter Tetzner

Dieter Tetzner
University of Cambridge | Cam · Department of Earth Sciences

Doctor of Philosophy
Postdoctoral researcher at British Antarctic Survey

About

17
Publications
3,196
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128
Citations

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
Full-text available
In this study, we present the age scales for three Antarctic Peninsula (AP) ice cores: Palmer, Rendezvous, and Jurassic. The three cores are all intermediate-depth cores, in the 133–141 m depth range. Non-sea-salt sulfate ([nssSO4]) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) display marked seasonal variability suitable for annual-layer counting. The Palmer ice c...
Article
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The climate of the sub-Antarctic is important in understanding the environmental conditions of Antarctica and the Southern Ocean. However, regional climate proxy records from this region are scarce. In this study, we present the stable water isotopes, major ion chemistry, and dust records from the first ice core from the (sub-)Antarctic Young Islan...
Preprint
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The presence of marine microfossils (diatoms) in glacier ice and ice cores has been documented from numerous sites in Antarctica, Greenland, as well as from sites in the Andes and the Altai mountains, and attributed to entrainment and transport by winds. However, their presence and diversity in snow and ice, especially in polar regions, is not well...
Article
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New ice-core records are being developed from the sub-Antarctic, a region previously lacking in paleoclimate archives. These records capture marine-sourced organic compounds that act as proxies for sea-ice concentration, and wind-lofted diatoms that reflect westerly wind strength.
Article
Full-text available
Antarctica is well known to be highly susceptible to atmospheric and oceanic warming. However, due to the lack of long-term and in situ meteorological observations, little is known about the magnitude of the warming and the meteorological conditions in the intersection region between the Antarctic Peninsula (AP), the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS)...
Article
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Winds in the Southern Ocean drive exchanges of heat and carbon dioxide between the ocean and atmosphere. Wind dynamics also explain the dominant patterns of both basal and surface melting of glaciers and ice shelves in the Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas. Long records of past wind strength and atmospheric circulation are needed to assess the signi...
Preprint
Full-text available
West Antarctica is well-known as a region that is highly susceptible to atmospheric and oceanic warming. However, due to the lack of long–term and in–situ meteorological observations little is known about the magnitude of the warming and the meteorological conditions in the region at the intersection between the Antarctic Peninsula (AP), the West A...
Article
Full-text available
Due to recent atmospheric and oceanic warming, the Antarctic Peninsula is one of the most challenging regions of Antarctica to understand in terms of both local- and regional-scale climate signals. Steep topography and a lack of long-term and in situ meteorological observations complicate the extrapolation of existing climate models to the sub-regi...
Article
Full-text available
The Antarctic Peninsula is one of the most challenging regions of Antarctica from a climatological perspective, owing to the recent atmospheric and oceanic warming. The steep topography and a lack of long–term and in situ meteorological observations complicate extrapolation of existing climate models to the sub-regional scale. Here, we present new...

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Project (1)
Project
The COrdillera Darwin Ice CorE Survey (CODICES) is a scientific research project which aims to determine the sensitivity of the glaciers from the Cordillera Darwin icefield and how the recent climate change is impacting them. For this, in 2020, we drilled the first ice core in the Cordillera Darwin icefield, an unprecedented record that will allow us to reconstruct how environmental parameters have evolved in this region during the last decades.