Diego P. Vázquez

Diego P. Vázquez
National Scientific and Technical Research Council | conicet · IADIZA - Instituto Argentino de Investigaciones de las Zonas Aridas

PhD

About

142
Publications
52,682
Reads
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10,035
Citations
Introduction
I am an ecologist at the Argentine Institute for Dryland Research, CONICET, and an associate professor at the National University of Cuyo, Mendoza, Argentina. I am generally interested in ecology, especially community ecology, plant-animal interactions, mutualism, ecological networks and invasions biology. Visit my web site for further information (http://interactio.org/).
Additional affiliations
March 2008 - present
National University of Cuyo
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
October 2002 - June 2005
University of California, Santa Barbara
Position
  • PostDoc Position
August 1997 - May 2002
University of Tennessee
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (142)
Article
Full-text available
Species coexisting in ecological communities interact in multiple ways to form complex networks. We review the growing literature on ecological interaction networks to address several key issues about this conceptual and methodological approach. We start by asking the most basic question: Why study networks and whether a network approach is (or is...
Article
Full-text available
Hikers and livestock using mountain trails damage native vegetation and act as seed vectors, thus favouring the spread of non-native plants. We evaluated the effect of trails and livestock abundance on the success of non-native plants in the arid central Andes of Argentina. We surveyed six trails, covering elevations between 2400 and 3570 m a.s.l....
Article
Full-text available
Invasive pollinators can disrupt native pollination mutualisms. We investigated the impact of the invasion of the European bumble bee Bombus terrestris in NW Patagonia, Argentina, on the pollination mutualism between the native legume Vicia nigricans and its main pollinator, the native bumble bee B. dahlbomii, and its consequences on plant reproduc...
Article
Switching plant species visited by pollinators (partner flexibility), has been proposed as a behavioural mechanism able to attenuate the negative impacts of shifts in plant communities on pollination. However, it is unclear if the magnitude of such response is generalizable or depends on the environmental context. Moreover, the ability of pollinato...
Article
Full-text available
The global challenge of feeding two billion more people by 2050, using more sustainable agricultural practices whilst dealing with uncertainties associated with environmental change, requires a transformation of food systems. We present a new perspective for how advances in network science can provide novel ways to better understand, harness, and r...
Preprint
Full-text available
Generalist species are important for maintaining network structure and function. Previous studies showed that interactions between generalists persist across sites and years. However, the mechanisms for persistence across spatiotemporal scales are not clear. To address this gap, we collected data on plant–pollinator interactions throughout the flow...
Article
Full-text available
Larger geographical areas contain more species—an observation raised to a law in ecology. Less explored is whether biodiversity changes are accompanied by a modification of interaction networks. We use data from 32 spatial interaction networks from different ecosystems to analyse how network structure changes with area. We find that basic community...
Article
While large herbivores are critically important components of terrestrial ecosystems and can have pronounced top‐down effects on plants, our understanding of the underlying mechanisms driving these effects remains incomplete. Large herbivores can alter plant growth, reproduction and abundance through direct effects (predominantly consumption) and t...
Article
Understanding the impacts of global change on ecological communities is a major challenge in modern ecology. The gain or loss of particular species and the disruption of key interactions are both consequences and drivers of global change that can lead to the disassembly of ecological networks. We examined whether the disruption of a hummingbird-mis...
Article
Ecological restoration has been increasingly considering biotic interactions. Different restoration strategies usually rely on different composition and abundance of plants with potential impact on the establishment of plant‐pollinator interactions. We evaluated the restoration of plant‐pollinator interaction networks in young restoration areas in...
Article
Honeybee hives may influence pollen and nectar availability in natural ecosystems, which may consequently affect wild pollinators. We studied the effects of managed honeybee hives on wild bee diversity in Villavicencio Nature Reserve (Mendoza, Argentina). We placed pan traps at increasing distances from honeybee hives to estimate wild bee abundance...
Article
1. It is not uncommon for one or a few species, and their interactions, to have disproportionate effects on other species in ecological communities. Such keystone interactions might affect how communities respond to the invasion of non‐native species by preventing or inhibiting the establishment, spread or impact of non‐native species. 2. We explor...
Preprint
Full-text available
Hikers and livestock using mountain trails damage native vegetation and act as seed vectors, thus favouring the spread of non-native plants. We evaluated the effect of trails and livestock abundance on the success of non-native plants in the arid central Andes of Argentina. We surveyed six trails, covering elevations between 2400 m and 3570 m a.s.l...
Article
Full-text available
Temporal variability of plant–pollinator interactions is important for fully understanding the structure, function, and stability of plant–pollinator networks, but most network studies so far have ignored within-day dynamics. Strong diel dynamics (e.g., a regular daily cycle) were found for networks with Cichorieae, which typically close their flow...
Article
Full-text available
Land-use generates multiple stress factors, and we need to understand their effects on plant–plant interactions to predict the consequences of land-use intensification. The stress–gradient hypothesis predicts that the relative strength of positive and negative interactions changes inversely under increasing environmental stress. However, the outcom...
Article
Full-text available
Generalist species are the linchpins of networks, as they are important for maintaining network structure and function. Previous studies have shown that interactions between generalists tend to occur consistently across years and sites. However, the link between temporal and spatial interaction persistence across scales remains unclear. To address...
Article
Ecological interactions link species in networks. Loss of species from or introduction of new species into an existing network may have substantial effects for interaction patterns. Predicting changes in interaction frequency while allowing for rewiring of existing interactions-and hence estimating the consequences of community compositional change...
Article
Full-text available
Based on the conceptual framework of pollination syndromes, pollination networks should be composed of well‐delimited subgroups formed by plants that diverge in floral phenotypes and are visited by taxonomically different pollinators. Nevertheless, floral traits are not always accurate in predicting floral visitors. For instance, flowers adapted to...
Article
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Studying how habitat loss affects the tolerance of ecological networks to species extinction (i.e., their robustness) is key for our understanding of the influence of human activities on natural ecosystems. With networks typically occurring as local interaction networks interconnected in space (a meta-network), we may ask how the loss of specific h...
Article
Biological invasions are a main threat to biodiversity and natural resources, which calls for studies that identify the regions that present the greatest invasion risks. We assessed the potential distribution of two non-native rose species, Rosa canina and Rosa rubiginosa, in mountain environments in mid-western Argentina, using species distributio...
Article
Full-text available
Synthesis has become ubiquitous in ecology. Despite its widespread application to a broad range of research topics, it remains unclear how synthesis has affected the discipline. Using a case study of publications (n = 2304) from the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis compared with papers with similar keywords from the Web of Scie...
Article
Full-text available
In semi-arid environments, the marked contrast in temperature and precipitation over the year strongly shapes ecological communities. The composition of species and their ecological interactions within a community may vary greatly over time. Although intra-annual variations are often studied, empirical information on how plant–bird relationships ar...
Article
Full-text available
Morphology and phenology influence plant–pollinator network structure, but whether they generate more stable pairwise interactions with higher pollination success remains unknown. Here we evaluate the importance of morphological trait matching, phenological overlap and specialisation for the spatio‐temporal stability (measured as variability) of pl...
Article
Niche and neutral processes jointly influence species interactions. Predictions of interactions based on these processes assume that they operate similarly across all species. However, species characteristics could systematically create differences in the strength of niche or neutral processes for each interspecific interaction. We used national‐le...
Article
Full-text available
The study of mutualistic interaction networks has led to valuable insights into ecological and evolutionary processes. However, our understanding of network structure may depend upon the temporal scale at which we sample and analyze network data. To date, we lack a comprehensive assessment of the temporal scale‐dependence of network structure acros...
Preprint
Full-text available
Plant–pollinator interactions are key for ecosystem maintenance and world crop production, and their occurrence depends on the synchronization of life-cycle events among interacting species. Phenological shifts observed for plant and pollinator species increase the risk of phenological mismatches, threatening community stability. However, the magni...
Preprint
Full-text available
The calculation of nestedness has become a routine analysis in the study of ecological networks, as it is commonly associated with community resilience, robustness and species persistence. While meaningful in species distributional patterns, for an interaction matrix to be nested, specialist species must interact with ordered subsets of subsequentl...
Article
Full-text available
Population declines of pollinators constitute a major concern for the fate of biodiversity and associated ecosystem services in a context of global change. Massive declines of pollinator populations driven by habitat loss, pollution, and climate change have been reported, whose consequences at community and ecosystem levels remain elusive. We condu...
Article
1. Mutualistic networks are highly dynamic, characterized by high temporal turnover of species and interactions. Yet, we have a limited understanding of how the internal structure of these networks and the roles species play in them vary through time. 2. We used six years of observation data and a novel statistical method (dynamic stochastic block...
Article
We studied the realized niche of two distant allopatric wool-carder bee populations (bee-plant interaction and reproductive biology in weather variability). In one population, we analyzed the direct and indirect effects of weather on bee-resource interactions. The two populations shared several niche characteristics but showed some differences. Ant...
Article
Although much effort has been devoted to identify plant traits related to invasiveness, the success of this approach remains elusive, likely because the relevance of particular traits for invasions is context-dependent. We studied plant invasions in the context of the recipient community in a mountain ecosystem of western Argentina by comparing tra...
Article
Different modelling approaches have been used to relate the structure of mutualistic interactions with the stability of communities. However, inconsistencies arise when we compare modelling outcomes with the patterns of interactions observed in empirical studies. To shed light on these inconsistencies, we explored the network structure‐stability re...
Article
Full-text available
The complexity of ecological systems is a major challenge for practitioners and decision-makers who work to avoid, mitigate and manage environmental change. Here, we illustrate how metaecology – the study of spatial interdependencies among ecological systems through fluxes of organisms, energy, and matter – can enhance understanding and improve man...
Article
Full-text available
Under a metacommunity framework, the spatial configuration of habitat fragments could determine local community structure. Yet, quantifying fragment connectivity is challenging, as it depends on multiple variables at several geographical scales. We assessed the extent to which fragment connectivity and area explain patterns in interaction structure...
Article
Full-text available
1.Species abundance is vulnerable to climate change and anthropogenic impact. Although numerous studies have examined the food web response to species loss, their response (e.g. in network topology and interaction frequency) to changes in species abundance has received little attention. 2.We experimentally reduced the abundance (by ca. 60%) of one...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Plant–pollinator systems are essential for ecosystem functioning, which calls for an understanding of the determinants of their robustness to environmental threats. Previous studies considering such robustness have focused mostly on species’ connectivity properties, particularly their degree. We hypothesized that species’ phenological attr...
Preprint
Full-text available
The complexity of ecological systems is a major challenge for practitioners and decision-makers who work to avoid, mitigate and manage environmental change. Here, we illustrate how metaecology - the study of spatial interdependencies among ecological systems through fluxes of organisms, energy, and matter - can enhance understanding and improve man...
Article
Full-text available
Species invasions constitute a major and poorly understood threat to plant-pollinator systems. General theory predicting which factors drive species invasion success and subsequent effects on native ecosystems is particularly lacking. We address this problem using a consumer-resource model of adaptive behavior and population dynamics to evaluate th...
Article
Full-text available
Land-use change is known to affect biodiversity, and there is increasing concern regarding how these changes may impact the provision of ecosystem services. Although functional composition (diversity and identity) could influence ecosystem properties and services at the community level, there is little quantitative understanding of these relationsh...
Article
Cement dust from cement plants around the world has multiple negative effects on organisms and their environment. Cement's effects come from its strongly alkaline nature and high content of heavy metals. Previous studies on plants have documented that cement dust deposition can influence plant vegetative growth, the lipid and ionic composition of t...
Article
Full-text available
Ecological interactions are highly dynamic in time and space. Previous studies of plant-animal mutualistic networks have shown that the occurrence of interactions varies substantially across years. We analyzed inter-annual variation of a quantitative mutualistic network, in which links are weighted by interaction frequency. The network was sampled...
Article
Full-text available
Using a total of 14,043 trap-nests (potential nest for bees), we documented the nest architecture, host plants, seasonality, and associated organisms of the following six native species of Anthidium (Megachilidae: Anthidiini) from the Central Monte Desert in Mendoza, Argentina: A. andinum Jörgensen; A. chubuti Cockerell; A. decaspilum Moure; A. fri...
Article
1. Fire represents a frequent disturbance in many ecosystems, which can affect plant-pollinator assemblages and hence the services they provide. Furthermore, fire events could affect the architecture of plant-pollinator interaction networks, modifying the structure and function of communities. 2. Some pollinators, such as wood-nesting bees, may be...
Article
Full-text available
The type of reproductive system may be an important trait for the establishment and maintenance of populations of invasive plant species in new areas, as it can influence their demography and genetics. We studied the breeding system of two exotic invasive species, Rosa rubiginosa and R. canina, in a natural reserve in Argentina, using a combination...
Article
Agricultural land management modifies ecosystem structure and functioning in natural landscapes. Pollinators are a key functional group that may suffer from such intensification. Here we evaluate how agricultural land management influences the diversity of pollen transported by pollinators and the pollination niche overlap among plants. We describe...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Diverse flower communities are more stable in floral resource production along the flowering season, but the question about how the diversity and stability of resources affect pollinator reproduction remains open. High plant diversity could favor short foraging trips, which in turn would enhance bee fitness. In addition to plant divers...
Data
Spatial design of the study sites, consisting in four 8 × 20 m plots in the corners of a 100 × 200 m rectangle, and two transects of 50 × 2 m in the middle.
Data
Raw data of plant species (the file must be converted to .csv document to run R codes). Column names: “sitio” refers to site name, “abund.flores” is the flower abundance, “raref” is the flower richness rarefied, “altitud” is the altitude, “anio.q” is the time elapsed since last fire. The other columns were not used in this study.
Data
Raw data of the consumed resources by bees (the file must be converted to .csv document to run R codes). Column names: “id.trampa” is a identification number for bee individuals, “codigo.i” is the bee species, “site” is name of the site, “codigo.p” is the plant species consumed, “sum.sp” are the number of pollen grains observed, “sum.tot” is the to...
Data
Scripts. R codes for analysis.
Data
R code for Spearman Partial Correlation.
Data
Raw data of bee species (the file must be converted to .csv document to run R codes). Column names: “codigo.i” refers to bee species, “sitio” refers to site names, “mean.no.celd” is the main number of brood cells per nest per site, “celd.tot” is the total number of cells, “nidos.tot” is the total number of nests.
Data
Basis set used for d-sep test used to evaluate the goodness of fit of the models in Figure “Models 1 and 2”. The variables in brackets are the independent ones and variables in {} are the conditional ones.
Data
Trap nests arranged in the field. Trap nests consist of wood pieces with a longitudinal hole of three different diameter where bee species nest. Each occupied trap nest constitutes one bee nest.
Data
Box-plot summarizing the path coefficients of Model 1 (see Fig. 1) for the seven bee species studied here. Model 1 describes the effect of flower diversity (estimated using flower richness), flower abundance (estimated using flower density) and temporal stability of flower production along the flowering season (estimated as the inverse of coefficie...
Data
Geographic location, altitude, post-fire age, flower density, and flower richness of the study sites.
Article
One of the most important current challenges for ecologists is to evaluate how human-induced changes in ecosystems would impact viability of populations. Demographic response to anthropogenic impact could help us to understand how to manage those impacts. Using demographic techniques and population projection models, here we assess if demography an...
Article
Studying bee nests can enlighten our understanding of feeding specialization and phylogenetic relationships of bees. We studied the nesting and feeding habits of Trichothurgus laticeps in the Monte desert ecosystem. Our results show that T. laticeps is attracted to pre-existing cavities in wood (trap nests), which were further excavated for nest co...
Article
Full-text available
Background. Diverse flower communities are more stable in floral resource production along the flowering season, but the question about how the diversity and stability of resources affect pollinator reproduction remains open. High plant diversity could favor short foraging trips, which in turn would enhance bee fitness. In addition to plant diversi...
Article
Full-text available
Background. Diverse flower communities are more stable in floral resource production along the flowering season, but the question about how the diversity and stability of resources affect pollinator reproduction remains open. High plant diversity could favor short foraging trips, which in turn would enhance bee fitness. In addition to plant diversi...
Article
A frequent observation in plant-animal mutualistic networks is that abundant species tend to be more generalised, interacting with a broader range of interaction partners than rare species. Uncovering the causal relationship between abundance and generalisation has been hindered by a chicken-and-egg dilemma: is generalisation a by-product of being...
Article
A frequent observation in plant-animal mutualistic networks is that abundant species tend to be more generalized, interacting with a broader range of interaction partners than rare species. Uncovering the causal relationship between abundance and generalization has been hindered by a chicken-and-egg dilemma: is generalization a by-product of being...
Article
While average temperature is likely to increase in most locations on Earth, many places will simultaneously experience higher variability in temperature, precipitation, and other climate variables. Although ecologists and evolutionary biologists widely recognize the potential impacts of changes in average climatic conditions, relatively little atte...
Article
Full-text available
Defensive mutualisms mediated by extrafloral nectaries are particularly variable; their net results may change with seasons, communities and environmental contexts. Particularly, an environmental factor that can promote changes in outcomes of ant‐plant interactions is elevation in mountainous regions. We tested whether (1) the interaction between t...
Article
Full-text available
The strength of species interactions influences strongly the structure and dynamics of ecological systems. Thus, quantifying such strength is crucial to understand how species interactions shape communities and ecosystems. Although the concepts and measurement of interaction strength in food webs have received much attention, there has been compara...