Diego Barneche

Diego Barneche
Australian Institute of Marine Science

PhD

About

58
Publications
29,478
Reads
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1,924
Citations
Additional affiliations
February 2020 - present
Australian Institute of Marine Science
Position
  • Statistician
January 2019 - January 2020
University of Exeter
Position
  • Lecturer
February 2018 - November 2018
The University of Sydney
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (58)
Article
Full-text available
The body size of marine megafauna can influence population dynamics because larger females have disproportionally greater reproductive output. We explored how this size scaling relationship can affect predictions of population size structure in nesting sea turtles by combining a phylogenetically controlled meta‐analysis with a long‐term field nesti...
Article
Full-text available
Human impact increasingly alters global ecosystems, often reducing biodiversity and disrupting the provision of essential ecosystem services to humanity. Therefore, preserving ecosystem functioning is a critical challenge of the twenty-first century. Coral reefs are declining worldwide due to the pervasive effects of climate change and intensive fi...
Article
Full-text available
Coral reefs provide a range of important services to humanity, which are underpinned by community-level ecological processes such as coral calcification. Estimating these processes relies on our knowledge of individual physiological rates and species-specific abundances in the field. For colonial animals such as reef-building corals, abundance is f...
Article
The global decline of coral reefs has led to calls for strategies that reconcile biodiversity conservation and fisheries benefits. Still, considerable gaps in our understanding of the spatial ecology of ecosystem services remain. We combined spatial information on larval dispersal networks and estimates of human pressure to test the importance of c...
Article
Full-text available
Outbreaks of corallivorous Crown-of-Thorns Starfish (CoTS, Acanthaster spp.) have caused persistent and widespread loss of coral cover across Indo-Pacific coral reefs. The potential drivers of these outbreaks have been debated for more than 50 years, hindering effective management to limit their destructive impacts. Here, we show that fish biomass...
Article
How does fecundity scale with female size? Female size not only affects the number and size of offspring released in any one reproductive bout (i.e. batch fecundity) but also affects frequency of bouts that occur within a given spawning season (i.e. spawning frequency). Previous studies have noted contrasting effects of female size on spawning freq...
Article
Several drivers explain the global distribution of all reef fish. However, whether these drivers also explain the distribution and traits of a functional subgroup involving cleaner fishes remain unclear. Here we examine the variation in traits of cleaner fishes and test whether historical, environmental, ecological and geographical drivers are corr...
Article
Consumption rates constitute a fundamental, yet relatively elusive quantity in ecophysiology and ecosystem ecology. Measuring consumption rates of highly mobile animals is often challenging, especially in the wild, which makes scientists rely on proxies such as bite rates. However, we still lack a theoretical framework that formally bridges these q...
Article
Aim Variation in the size and position of geographical ranges is a key variable that underlies most biogeographical patterns. However, relatively little is known in terms of general principles driving their evolution, particularly in the marine realm. In this study we explore several fundamental properties regarding the evolution of reef fish latit...
Article
Full-text available
In natural ecosystems, the efficiency of energy transfer from resources to consumers determines the biomass structure of food webs. As a general rule, about 10% of the energy produced in one trophic level makes it up to the next1-3. Recent theory suggests this energy transfer could be further constrained if rising temperatures increase metabolic gr...
Article
Full-text available
Sea‐level rise is predicted to cause major damage to tropical coastlines. While coral reefs can act as natural barriers for ocean waves, their protection hinges on the ability of scleractinian corals to produce enough calcium carbonate (CaCO3) to keep up with rising sea levels. As a consequence of intensifying disturbances, coral communities are ch...
Preprint
Full-text available
Aim In this study we explore patterns and evolutionary processes of tropical reef fish latitudinal ranges, namely the degree of similarity in range size between ancestor and descendant lineages (i.e. phylogenetic signal); the evolution of range limits; and the latitudinal distribution of range sizes, particularly with respect to Rapoport’s rule. L...
Article
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Energy flow and nutrient cycling dictate the functional role of organisms in ecosystems. Fishes are key vectors of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) in aquatic systems, and the quantification of elemental fluxes is often achieved by coupling bioenergetics and stoichiometry. While nutrient limitation has been accounted for in several stoi...
Article
Full-text available
Plant traits—the morphological, anatomical, physiological, biochemical and phenological characteristics of plants—determine how plants respond to environmental factors, affect other trophic levels, and influence ecosystem properties and their benefits and detriments to people. Plant trait data thus represent the basis for a vast area of research sp...
Article
Marine protected areas (MPAs) are important tools for managing marine ecosystems. MPAs are expected to replenish nearby exploited populations through the natural dispersal of young, but the models that make these predictions rely on assumptions that have recently been demonstrated to be incorrect for most species of fish. A meta‐analysis showed tha...
Article
1 Growth rates directly influence individual fitness and constrain the flow of energy within food webs. Determining what factors alter the energetic cost of growth is therefore fundamental to ecological and evolutionary models. 2. Here we used theory to derive predictions about how the cost of growth varies over ontogeny and with temperature. We te...
Article
Full-text available
Aim To investigate biotic and abiotic correlates of reef‐fish species richness across multiple spatial scales. Location Tropical reefs around the globe, including 485 sites in 109 sub‐provinces spread across 14 biogeographic provinces. Time period Present. Major taxa studied 2,523 species of reef fish. Methods We compiled a database encompassin...
Article
Full-text available
Aim The negative correlation between temperature and body size of ectothermic animals (broadly known as the temperature‐size rule or TSR) is a widely observed pattern, especially in aquatic organisms. Studies have claimed that the TSR arises due to decreased oxygen solubility and increasing metabolic costs at warmer temperatures, whereby oxygen sup...
Article
Full-text available
Aim The negative correlation between temperature and body size of ectothermic animals (broadly known as the temperature-size rule or TSR) is a widely observed pattern, especially in aquatic organisms. Studies have claimed that TSR arises due to decreased oxygen solubility and increasing metabolic costs at warmer temperatures, whereby oxygen supply...
Article
To test long‐standing theory on the role of environmental conditions (both mean and predictability) in shaping global patterns in the egg sizes of marine fishes. Global (50° S to 50° N). 1880 to 2015. Marine fish. We compiled the largest geo‐located dataset of marine fish egg size (diameter) to date (n = 1,078 observations; 192 studies; 288 species...
Article
Full-text available
Body size determines total reproductive-energy output. Most theories assume reproductive output is a fixed proportion of size, with respect to mass, but formal macroecological tests are lacking. Management based on that assumption risks underestimating the contribution of larger mothers to replenishment, hindering sustainable harvesting. We test th...
Article
The allocation of metabolic energy to growth fundamentally influences all levels of biological organisation. Here we use a first‐principles theoretical model to characterise the energetics of fish growth at distinct ontogenetic stages and in distinct thermal regimes. Empirically, we show that the mass scaling of growth rates follows that of metabol...
Article
Full-text available
Biological networks pervade nature. They describe systems throughout all levels of biological organization, from molecules regulating metabolism to species interactions that shape ecosystem dynamics. The network thinking revealed recurrent organizational patterns in complex biological systems, such as the formation of semi-independent groups of con...
Data
Methodological approach to define a binary interaction in weighted networks. Color code corresponds to the strength of the interaction between elements. Hypothetical square adjacency matrices in which (A) the interactions between elements of a one-mode network are filtered off according to cut-offs (x) that range from 0.1 to 0.9 in interaction weig...
Data
Relationship between Unipartite Nestedness (UNODF) and size of theoretical nested one-mode networks. (A) UNODF and size (number of nodes, n) of perfectly nested networks. (B) Adjacency binary matrices (yellow cell = 1, blue = 0) of representative small networks (20 > n > 3) and their respective unipartite nestedness values among columns and rows (U...
Data
Network metrics describing the centralization of the network and Unipartite Nestedness (UNODF) in one-mode networks. Centralization is measured here by 6 metrics (colored lines) for both theoretical (perfectly nested, Barabási, Erdös-Rènyi) and empirical networks (three examples for each of the six biological levels: molecular, individual, populati...
Data
Relationship between Unipartite Nestedness (UNODF), network connectance and size. (A) UNODF and network connectance (proportion of realized links in relation to possible links); and (B) UNODF and network size (number of nodes). A simple linear regression suggests that UNODF increases with connectance (R2 = 0.73, p<0.0001) but not with size (R2 = 0....
Data
Relationship between Unipartite Nestedness (UNODF) and network centralization, as given by a simple linear model. Here, we corrected UNODF for network connectance using the residuals of the regression between UNODF and connectance; see S5 Fig. Centralization was described using the first principal component to summarize (A) all 6 centralization met...
Data
Characterization of the 18 systems encompassing six levels of organization considered in this study and the biological entities or processes depicted by their network representation. (DOCX)
Article
Biological invasions are one of the biggest threats to global biodiversity. Marine artificial structures are proliferating worldwide and provide a haven for marine invasive species. Such structures disrupt local hydrodynamics, which can lead to the formation of oxygen-depleted microsites. The extent to which native fauna can cope with such low oxyg...
Article
Accessing many fundamental questions in biology begins with empirical estimation of simple monotonic rates of underlying biological processes. Across a variety of disciplines, ranging from physiology to biogeochemistry, these rates are routinely estimated from non-linear and noisy time series data using linear regression and ad hoc manual truncatio...
Article
In this response we have incorporated data on gastropod and seaweed biodiversity referred to by A�vila et al. (2016, Journal of Biogeography, doi:10.1111/jbi.12816) to allow an updated analysis on marine shal- low-water biogeography patterns. When compared to the biogeography patterns reported in Hachich et al. (2015, Journal of Biogeography, 42, 1...
Article
Body size and temperature are fundamental drivers of ecological processes because they determine metabolic rates at the individual level. Whether these drivers act independently on individual-level metabolic rates remains uncertain. Most studies of intraspecific scaling of unitary organisms must rely on pre-existing differences in size to examine i...
Article
Taxonomic nestedness, the degree to which the taxonomic composition of species-poor assemblages represents a subset of richer sites, commonly occurs in habitat fragments and islands differing in size and isolation from a source pool. However, species are not ecologically equivalent and the extent to which nestedness is observed also in terms of fun...
Article
Full-text available
Population ecology has classically focused on pairwise species interactions, hindering the description of general patterns and processes of population abundance at large spatial scales. Here we use the metabolic theory of ecology as a framework to formulate and test a model that yields predictions linking population density to the physiological con...
Article
Full-text available
The feeding behaviour and diet plasticity of a given species are usually shaped by the relationship between species physiology and the quality and availability of resources in the environment. As such, some species may achieve wide geographical distributions by utilizing multiple resources at different sites within their ranges. We studied the dist...
Article
Aim The aim of this study was to understand whether the large-scale biogeo- graphical patterns of the species–area, species–island age and species–isolation relationships associated with marine shallow-water groups in the Atlantic Ocean vary among marine taxa and differ from the biogeographical patterns observed in terrestrial habitats. Location At...
Article
At the molecular level, the process of living involves coupled biochemical reactions that result in the uptake and transformation of energy and materials by an organism, yielding biomass to support its growth and reproduction, along with waste products. Ultimately, the dynamics of this process must adhere to constraints imposed by first principles...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding how plants are constructed—i.e., how key size dimensions and the amount of mass invested in different tissues varies among individuals—is essential for modeling plant growth, carbon stocks, and energy fluxes in the terrestrial biosphere. Allocation patterns can differ through ontogeny, but also among coexisting species and among speci...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding how plants are constructed—i.e., how key size dimensions and the amount of mass invested in different tissues varies among individuals—is essential for modeling plant growth, carbon stocks, and energy fluxes in the terrestrial biosphere. Allocation patterns can differ through ontogeny, but also among coexisting species and among speci...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding how plants are constructed; i.e., how key size dimensions and the amount of mass invested in different tissues varies among individuals; is essential for modeling plant growth, estimating carbon stocks, and mapping energy fluxes in the terrestrial biosphere. Allocation patterns can differ through ontogeny, but also among coexisting sp...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigates the reef fish community structure of the world’s smallest remote tropical island, the St Peter and St Paul’s Archipelago, in the equatorial Atlantic. The interplay between isolation, high endemism and low species richness makes the St Peter and St Paul’s Archipelago ecologically simpler than larger and highly connected shelf...
Article
Full-text available
Top predators have strong influence on the structure and dynamics of marine ecosystems. These organisms have been largely used as indicators to assess the effectiveness of marine protected areas (MPAs). In Brazil, the impact of fisheries on reef species, such as groupers and sea basses, and the importance of local marine reserves in the maintenance...
Article
Full-text available
The disparity in species richness among evolutionary lineages is one of the oldest and most intriguing issues in evolutionary biology. Although geographical factors have been traditionally thought to promote speciation, recent studies have underscored the importance of ecological interactions as one of the main drivers of diversification. Here, we...
Article
Fishes contribute substantially to energy and nutrient fluxes in reef ecosystems, but quantifying these roles is challenging. Here, we do so by synthesising a large compilation of fish metabolic-rate data with a comprehensive database on reef-fish community abundance and biomass. Individual-level analyses support predictions of Metabolic Theory aft...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Distribución en profundidad de la ictiofauna del litoral rocoso, a lo largo de la costa brasileña. Se estudiaron, caracterizaron y analizaron las poblaciones ictiológicas a lo largo de la costa brasileña, atendiendo a 3 rangos de profundidad y a los diferentes grupos tróficos a los que pertenecen dichas especies. Los lugares estudiados se distribuy...
Article
Full-text available
We present a list with 10 new records of reef fish on the coast of Santa Catarina State, the southernmost site of tropical reef fish occurrence on the Brazilian coast. We also comment on the distribution-range of the recently described Halichoeres sazimai (Labridae).
Article
Full-text available
The present study provides the first analysis of the feeding macroecology of territorial damselfishes (Perciformes: Pomacentridae), a circumtropical family whose feeding and behavioral activities are important in structuring tropical and subtropical reef benthic communities. The analyses were conducted from data collected by the authors and from th...

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