Didier Binder

Didier Binder
French National Centre for Scientific Research | CNRS

PhD

About

261
Publications
62,129
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2,989
Citations
Citations since 2017
80 Research Items
1577 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250300
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250300
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250300
Additional affiliations
October 1983 - April 2021
French National Centre for Scientific Research
Position
  • Research Director

Publications

Publications (261)
Chapter
Full-text available
The macro- and mesoscopic analysis of the Impresso-Cardial pottery assemblage from the Pendimoun rock shelter located in Castellar (Alpes-Maritimes, France) revealed a range of previously unrecognised macrotraces and mesostructures on all pottery vessels, independently of their shape or size. These traces suggested a forming sequence involving the...
Chapter
Full-text available
The series of actions carried out by the first farmers during the manufacturing of their pottery, an essential part of their economic package, can act as a powerful proxy of their spatial and temporal trajectories. This proxy is based on the demonstration in social anthropology of an unequivocal link between the chaîne opératoire of a ceramic and t...
Chapter
Full-text available
Over the last two decades the neolithisation of the Liguro-Provençal arc has been studied mainly through the characterisation and provenance of long-distance materials, which are likely to provide information about the settlement dynamics of the very first Neolithic societies. Like obsidian, the circulation of raw materials and ceramics makes it po...
Article
Full-text available
Archaeological research shows that the dispersal of the Neolithic took a more complex turn when reaching western Europe, painting complex picture of interactions between autochthonous hunter-gatherers and incoming farmers. In order to clarify the mode, the intensity and the regional variability of biological exchanges implied in these processes, we...
Article
In order to map the migration and introduction of farming into Europe during the seventh and sixth millennia Before Common Era, archeologists have made a connection between the study of pottery and farming migration. We are interested here in the classification of pottery into coiling and spiral types based on their manufacturing techniques. To dis...
Article
Full-text available
Sicily is a key region for understanding the agricultural transition in the Mediterranean, due to its central position. Here, we present genomic and stable isotopic data for 19 prehistoric Sicilians covering the Mesolithic to Bronze Age periods (10,700-4,100 yBP). We find that Early Mesolithic hunter-gatherers (HGs) from Sicily are a highly drifted...
Preprint
Full-text available
Stable isotope analyses (δ13C and δ15N) of human bones have been crucial for understanding the diets of Neolithic societies. However, isotopic measurements of wild and cultivated vegetal resources have not as yet been integrated into reconstructions of human diets. This study explores the isotopic variations in seed and fruit remains from seven Neo...
Article
Full-text available
Hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been infecting humans for millennia and remains a global health problem, but its past diversity and dispersal routes are largely unknown. We generated HBV genomic data from 137 Eurasians and Native Americans dated between ~10,500 and ~400 years ago. We date the most recent common ancestor of all HBV lineages to between ~...
Article
Full-text available
Micro‐computed tomography is a valuable tool for studying ancient ceramics technology. Analysing pottery 3‐D images is a challenging issue, the data being extremely noisy and heterogeneous. Quantitative criteria are introduced for the characterisation of a previously unrecognised pottery building method, the Spiralled Patchwork Technology (SPT). An...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Le PCR « Réseau de lithothèques en AuvergneRhône-Alpes » offre un cadre nouveau pour la pétroarchéologie et s’engage pour une science ouverte qui passe par la mise en place de formats d’échanges standardisés répondant à des normes internationales. Il contribue ainsi à la réalisation et la diffusion de fiches numérisées et harmonisées nécessaires à...
Article
The early phases of Neolithic expansion in the Central and Western Mediterranean are relatively poorly understood with regards to the diversity in the subsistence economy and the degree of interaction with indigenous hunter-gatherers. Recent analysis of pottery manufacturing techniques also points to a surprisingly diverse range of practices across...
Article
Plant resins, tars and organic fossil substances provide valuable insights into the ecological, environmental and cultural contexts of ancient societies. Their study offers evidence of past know-how, production systems, socio-economic networks and mobility. In this paper, we present new data from 16 sites located in the North-West Mediterranean tha...
Article
Full-text available
Stable isotope analyses (δ13C and δ15N) of human bones have been crucial for understanding the diets of Neolithic societies. However, isotopic measurements of wild and cultivated vegetal resources have not as yet been integrated into reconstructions of human diets. This study explores the isotopic variations in seed and fruit remains from seven Neo...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
During the Epigravettian (22,000 – 9,000 cal. BCE), ornaments were mainly made of marine shells. The assemblage discovered at the site of the Martin rock shelter (Gréolières, Alpes-Maritimes), is completely in keeping with this tradition. We study here the 136 marine shells recovered during the rescue excavation, by integrating the choice of shell...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives The aims of this research are to explore the diet, mobility, social organization, and environmental exploitation patterns of early Mediterranean farmers, particularly the role of marine and plant resources in these foodways. In addition, this work strives to document possible gendered patterns of behavior linked to the neolithization of...
Article
Full-text available
Starting from 12,000 years ago in the Middle East, the Neolithic lifestyle spread across Europe via separate continental and Mediterranean routes. Genomes from early European farmers have shown a clear Near Eastern/Anatolian genetic affinity with limited contribution from hunter-gatherers. However, no genomic data are available from modern-day Fran...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Projet Collectif de Recherche « Réseau de lithothèques en Auvergne Rhône-Alpes »
Article
Full-text available
Pendimoun rock-shelter is among the oldest Neolithic sites known on the French littoral (Impressa culture, since ca. 5700 bce). It was discontinuously occupied from the Mesolithic to the end of the Neolithic. During the Neolithic, it was used for pastoral purposes and domestic activities as well as for pottery production. Agriculture and cereal pro...
Article
The Neolithisation of the North-Western Mediterranean is still an open issue. New data has recently enriched the chronological and cultural archaeological framework, providing more precise absolute dates and revealing a new and more complex process of expansion of farming in Southern Europe. The Mediterranean route of colonization (6000–5600 BCE),...
Article
Recent research into the European Neolithisation process and the development of farming communities reveals a diverse and complex cultural landscape. In the Western Mediterranean, it is now well known that the first agro-pastoral economy appears around 6000 BCE in south-eastern Italy and that part of these sites, often grouped under the generic ter...
Article
Porosity of archaeological pottery is a key parameter used to assess its ability to trap lipids during the use of the pot and to preserve them over time. Mercury intrusion porosimetry and gas chromatography were used to study the distribution of porosity and the preservation of lipids in different chrono‐cultural contexts. The data obtained show th...
Article
Full-text available
Birch bark tar, the oldest adhesive known in Europe, was widely used during Prehistory. This material, produced by the dry distillation of birch bark, has been identified in various spheres of activities and provides valuable information on the know-how and technical and territorial systems of past societies. This biomaterial can also provide evide...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Le programme collectif de recherche, « Réseau de lithothèques en Nouvelle-Aquitaine » existe depuis 3 ans. Il joue un rôle important dans la consolidation d’une structure coopérative de recherche à l’échelle régionale et nationale. Le présent rapport expose un état de l’art des activités menées à bien en 2018 pour participer de façon efficace à la...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Le programme collectif de recherche réseau de lithothèques en Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes existe depuis 12 ans. Il est à l’initiative d’une synergie désormais reconnue sur l’origine des matières premières. Sa fonction est essentielle dans la consolidation d’une structure coopérative de recherche aux échelles régionale et nationale. Démarche nécessaire, qu...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding details of stone tool procurement and transfers is for a major research avenue in improving our knowledge about prehistoric societies. The accuracy of the provisioning sources identifications is based on the establishment of large regional repositories. Recent studies show that specific investigations on the evolution of cherts were e...
Article
In the framework of the reassessment of the Neolithic Square-Mouthed Pottery series from locus P8, Lare 2 cave (Saint-Benoit, Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, South-eastern France), two sherds were identified as possible replicas or importations of fine painted ware (i.e. figulina) from Serra d’Alto contexts (Southern Italy). Combining geological and chemi...
Article
Spiralled patchwork in pottery manufacture and the introduction of farming to Southern Europe—ERRATUM - Volume 92 Issue 361 - Louise Gomart, Allon Weiner, Marzia Gabriele, Gilles Durrenmath, Sabine Sorin, Lucia Angeli, Marta Colombo, Cristina Fabbri, Roberto Maggi, Chiara Panelli, Didier F. Pisani, Giovanna Radi, Carlo Tozzi, Didier Binder
Article
Full-text available
Excavated in the middle of the 1960’ by M. Sechter, the site of Mougins – Bréguières, in Southeastern France, appears of a huge patrimonial and scientific interest, due to the exceptional abundance and preservation of human bones, the singularity of associated material, and the specificity of the place, a fault, where the corpses were left. In the...
Article
Full-text available
Pottery-manufacturing sequences can act as proxies for human migration and interaction. A good example is provided by the 'spiralled patchwork technology' (SPT) identified at two key early farming sites in the Ligurian-Provencal Arc in the north-west of the Italian peninsula. SPT is distinct from the ceramic technology used by early farmer communit...
Article
Full-text available
The authors attempt to specify the diffusion pattern of the Impressed-Ware Neolithic (Im­presso-cardial complex, ICC), from south-eastern Italy onto the French Mediterranean coasts. Using ChronoModel® software, a Bayesian model was built with sets of dates obtained on well-contextualised, short-lived samples. The results highlight a clear tightenin...
Poster
New excavations conducted at the Arene Candide Cave allowed for the documenting of a detailed stratigraphic sequence in the Impresso-Cardial Complex layers. Through techno- typological studies of pottery, including re tting of sherds and the analysis of their stratigraphic distribution, we have recognized at least three different chrono-cultural ho...
Article
In the north western Mediterranean, in the area between the Rhone River and the Northern Apennines, the last Mesolithic societies (Castelnovian) and the first Neolithic societies (Impressed Ware or Impressa) coexisted during the first half of the 6th millennium cal. BCE (Before Common Era). Linking the two settlement distribution patterns (mainly h...
Article
The 1950s excavations at Châteauneuf-lès-Martigues-type site of the Late Mesolithic Castelnovian phase-played a significant role in shaping theories about the nature of the Neolithic transition in the western Mediterranean. Results of new AMS dating and Bayesian modelling of extant short life samples now date the Late Mesolithic deposits to c. 6460...