Dianne Margaret Gleeson

Dianne Margaret Gleeson
University of Canberra · Centre for Conservation Ecology and Genomics

PhD

About

287
Publications
33,103
Reads
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3,275
Citations
Citations since 2017
45 Research Items
1867 Citations
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Introduction
Dianne is a wildlife geneticist, with 18yrs of research experience in the application of DNA technologies for biodiversity conservation outcomes in both New Zealand and Australia. Currently she leads a team at the Institute for Applied Ecology, University of Canberra, which is focused on the development of eDNA technologies for individual species detection and whole community analysis in freshwater systems.
Additional affiliations
January 2012 - present
University of Canberra
Position
  • Science Program Leader
January 2010 - March 2012
University of Auckland
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
August 1996 - June 2012
Manaaki Whenua - Landcare Research
Position
  • Research Leader

Publications

Publications (287)
Preprint
Full-text available
Terrestrial invasive invertebrates can rapidly colonize new areas, causing detrimental effects on biodiversity, economy, and lifestyle. Targeted environmental DNA (eDNA) methods could constitute an early detection tool given their sensitivity to small numbers of individuals. We hypothesized that terrestrial runoff would transport eDNA from the land...
Article
Full-text available
Carp (Cyprinus sp.) are a highly invasive fish that pose a significant threat to freshwater ecosystems worldwide. At high biomasses (i.e., ≥100 kg/ha), the benthic feeding behaviour of carp can have deleterious ecosystem effects, often changing clear, macrophyte dominant waterbodies to turbid-phytoplankton dominant ecosystems. To prevent carp from...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The use of environmental DNA (eDNA) and RNA (eRNA) methods is a rapidly advancing field that provides fast, cost-effective, non-invasive methods to identify the presence of target species. These methods can be used, for example, to screen for pest species as part of biosecurity measures and risk management, to screen for threatened species as part...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The use of molecular assays to assess the presence of species using environmental DNA (eDNA) and RNA (eRNA) as analytes has diversified as the field of environmental surveillance advances. These methods can be used, for example, to screen for pest species as part of biosecurity measures and risk management, to screen for threatened species as part...
Article
Full-text available
This preliminary study used DNA metabarcoding to test whether the stomach content and gut microbiome of tuna could be a viable near real-time monitoring tool for detecting composition and change in oceanic ecosystems. The gut content of skipjack (Katsuwonus pelamis, n=55) and yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares, n=46) captured in the Pacific Ocean du...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Sensitive detection techniques are key to inform management practices for invasive and pest species by identifying the pest species’ distribution or identifying the presence of biological control agents that may negate the need for chemical control. Environmental DNA (eDNA) can be detected to infer the presence of rare, cryptic, and invasi...
Article
Full-text available
Khapra beetle, Trogoderma granarium Everts, 1898, is a serious pest of stored grain products globally. Environmental DNA (eDNA)-based methods offer sensitive detection tools used to inform biosecurity officers on the presence of high-risk pests. This study tested laboratory and portable molecular technologies to detect khapra beetle environmental D...
Article
Full-text available
Sex-determination mechanisms and sex chromosomes are known to vary among reptile species and, in a few celebrated examples, within populations of the same species. The oriental garden lizard, Calotes versicolor, is one of the most intriguing species in this regard, exhibiting evidence of multiple sex-determination modes within a single species. One...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental DNA (eDNA) monitoring has revolutionized the way biodiversity is surveyed and has been proposed as a reliable method to inform management decisions. Recognition of eDNA techniques as reliable tools to inform management and biosecurity require stringent standards to assess sample quality and reliability of results. Laboratories can hav...
Article
Full-text available
• Environmental DNA (eDNA) monitoring is a useful tool for species detection but its use in addressing management questions remains scarce. One factor limiting the use of eDNA as a routine monitoring tool is uncertainty around the potential of eDNA data to estimate species abundance. While several confounding factors limit the ability of eDNA data...
Article
Full-text available
The giant freshwater crayfish, Astacopsis gouldi Clark, 1936, is an endangered endemic freshwater species native to Northern Tasmania. Habitat loss, fishing pressure, and climate change have been identified as threatening processes. The Australian government approved a recovery plan for A. gouldi in 2017 that requires routine population surveys to...
Article
There is increasing interest in the health of waterways in Aotearoa New Zealand. The National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 (NPS-FM) places a greater onus on resource managers to report on the state of freshwater ecosystem health, including fish. Routine fish monitoring is time intensive and is principally conducted in ‘wadeable’...
Article
Full-text available
The presence of threatened or endangered species often strongly influences management and conservation decisions. Within the Murray–Darling Basin (MDB), Australia, the presence of threatened native fish affects the management and allocation of water resources. These decisions are currently based on traditional fisheries data and a predictive MaxEnt...
Article
Full-text available
• The presence of threatened or endangered species often strongly influences management and conservation decisions. Within the Murray–Darling Basin (MDB), Australia, the presence of threatened native fish affects the management and allocation of water resources. In New South Wales, these decisions are currently based on traditional fisheries data a...
Article
Diet composition is a fundamental part of animal ecology and an important component of population dynamics.  The livestock taxa identified in the cheetah faeces occurred at moderate frequency.  Livestock predation was neither influenced by sex of cheetah nor season.  Cheetah mainly prey on small-medium wild ungulates.  Faecal DNA metabarcoding...
Article
Full-text available
Two species breeding in sympatry are more likely to coexist if their ecological niches are segregated either in time, space or in trophic habits. Here, we combined GPS-tracking, stable isotope analysis and DNA metabarcoding analysis to understand how the rare Tahiti petrel Pseudobulweria rostrata (TP) copes with the very abundant (i.e. 500,000 bree...
Article
Gene flow is a key evolutionary driver of spatial genetic structure, reflecting demographic processes and dispersal mechanisms. Understanding how genetic structure is maintained across a landscape can assist in setting conservation objectives. In Australia, floodplains naturally experience highly variable flooding regimes that structure the vegetat...
Article
Scat DNA metabarcoding is increasingly being used to track the feeding ecology of elusive wildlife species. This approach has greatly increased the resolution and detection success of prey items contained in scats when compared with other classical methods. However, there have been few studies that have systematically tested the applicability and r...
Article
Full-text available
Scat DNA metabarcoding is increasingly being used to track the feeding ecology of elusive wildlife species. This approach has greatly increased the resolution and detection success of prey items contained in scats when compared with other classical methods. However, there have been few studies that have systematically tested the applicability and r...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The use of environmental DNA analysis has revolutionized biodiversity monitoring. Initially, eDNA monitoring surveys in aquatic environments utilized a targeted approach, but there has been a steady shift toward whole community assessments (eDNA metabarcoding). Both approaches can increase the detection sensitivity for rare and elusive...
Article
Full-text available
Eradications of invasive species are usually expensive and difficult to conduct. Knowing when to declare an eradication successful requires distinguishing between failed detection of the target species due to imperfect sensitivity of the detection method and true species absence. This is difficult because the sensitivities of many detection methods...
Article
Full-text available
Monitoring aquatic biodiversity through DNA extracted from environmental samples (eDNA) combined with high-throughput sequencing, commonly referred to as eDNA metabarcoding, is increasing in popularity within the scientific community. However, sampling strategies, laboratory protocols and analytical pipelines can influence the results of eDNA metab...
Article
Full-text available
Context. Translocations are becoming an increasingly important conservation tool to combat rising levels of species extinction. Unfortunately, many translocation efforts fail; yet, the timing and cause of failure often remain unknown. Monitoring individuals in the days and weeks following release can provide valuable information on their capacity t...
Article
Full-text available
The sensitivity and specificity of eDNA-based monitoring, coupled with its potential utility to estimate population density or biomass, makes it a useful tool in invasive species management. In this study, we investigated the potential of the eDNA method to improve the detection of the elusive invasive fish, oriental weatherloach (Misgurnus anguill...
Article
Full-text available
High‐throughput sequencing of environmental DNA (i.e., eDNA metabarcoding) has become an increasingly popular method for monitoring aquatic biodiversity. At present, such analyses require target‐specific primers to amplify DNA barcodes from co‐occurring species, and this initial amplification can introduce biases. Understanding the performance of d...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental DNA (eDNA) is increasingly used to monitor aquatic macro-fauna. Typically, short mitochondrial DNA fragments are targeted because these should be relatively more abundant in the environment as longer fragments will break into smaller fragments over time. However, longer fragments may permit more flexible primer design and increase tax...
Article
Full-text available
Reptiles show remarkable diversity in modes of reproduction and sex determination, including high variation in the morphology of sex chromosomes, ranging from homomorphic to highly heteromorphic. Additionally, the coexistence of genotypic sex determination (GSD) and temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) within and among sister clades makes...
Article
Full-text available
The environmental DNA (eDNA) method is a detection technique that is rapidly gaining credibility as a sensitive tool useful in the surveillance and monitoring of invasive and threatened species. Because eDNA analysis often deals with small quantities of short and degraded DNA fragments, methods that maximize eDNA recovery are required to increase d...
Data
Multiple Pairwise comparisons of eDNA methods using Tukey’s HSD for Experiment 1: DNA capture, preservation and extraction. (XLSX)
Data
DNA copy numbers from qPCRs for all experiments. (XLSX)
Data
Multiple Pairwise comparisons of the simple main effects for DNA Extraction kit for Experiment 2A. (XLSX)
Data
Product details of filter papers used in the experiments. (XLSX)
Data
Multiple Pairwise comparisons of the simple main effects of filter paper for Experiment 2A. (XLSX)
Data
Multiple Pairwise comparisons of the simple main effects of time for Experiment 3A. (XLSX)
Data
Multiple Pairwise comparisons of the simple main effects of storage method for Experiment 3A. (XLSX)
Presentation
Full-text available
As identifying illegally traded taxa is often difficult through visual observations, DNA-based species identification has been routinely applied for forensic case-work. While traditional DNA barcoding utilises physical samples from individual taxa (tissue, blood, etc.), recent advances now allow us to identify species using DNA derived from environ...
Article
Full-text available
Despite decades of research, empirical support for the “compatible genes” and “good genes” hypotheses as explanations for adaptive female extra-pair mating remains discordant. One largely un-tested theoretical prediction that could explain equivocal findings is that mating for compatible genes benefits should reduce selection for good genes. Howeve...
Poster
Full-text available
The use of DNA extracted from environmental water samples (eDNA) has become increasingly popular to monitor aquatic biodiversity. Applying high-throughput sequencing technologies to eDNA samples (eDNA metabarcoding) can provide an accurate snapshot of the biodiversity present within a water body. Current workflows for eDNA metabarcoding studies req...
Article
Full-text available
1. Determining the timing and location of reproductive events is critical for efficient management of species. However, methods currently used for aquatic species are costly, time intensive, biased and often require destructive or injurious sampling. Hence, developing a non-invasive sampling method to accurately determine the timing and location of...
Article
Full-text available
The potential of environmental DNA (eDNA) methods to enhance the detection of invasive species during routine monitoring is of interest to management agencies. Here we applied the eDNA methodology concurrent with conventional detection techniques during two routine monitoring seasons to detect the presence of three invasive fish in Australia with c...
Article
Full-text available
On-ground management actions targeting invasive and/or native species are often undertaken based on incomplete and biased distribution data for the species of interest. Once an invasive species becomes established, containment can provide an effective management option to conserve native biodiversity only if it is implemented beyond the outer distr...
Article
Although described as a distinct species in 1869, for more than a century now New Zealand's grey-faced petrel (Pterodroma macroptera gouldi Hutton, 1869) has been regarded as a subspecies of the great-winged petrel (P. macroptera A. Smith, 1840). However, several authors have recently questioned whether the taxon once again deserves full species st...
Article
Background: Anticoagulant toxins are used globally to control rats. Resistance of Rattus species to these toxins now occurs in at least 18 countries in Europe, America, and Asia. Resistance is often associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the Vkorc1 gene. This study gives a first overview of the distribution and frequency of Vkorc...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive alien species are one of the leading causes of extinctions worldwide. Preventing their establishment, eradicating or containing their spread relies on low-density detection. Environmental DNA (eDNA) has been shown to have superior detection sensitivity compared to traditional methods, permitting detection at lower densities and with greate...
Article
Full-text available
Species-specific environmental DNA (eDNA) surveys are increasingly being used to infer species presence in an environment. Current inadequacies in quality control increase concern for false negatives, which can have serious ramifications for both the management of invasive species and the conservation of native species. Environmental DNA surveys in...
Presentation
Full-text available
Determining the time and location of reproduction for threatened species is critical to design and evaluate management actions. The current available methods for monitoring reproduction in aquatic species are often biased, costly, time intensive and sometimes require lethal sampling. Here we present an environmental DNA (eDNA) based methodology for...
Article
Full-text available
Imperfect sensitivity, or imperfect detection, is a feature of all survey methods that needs to be accounted for when interpreting survey results. Detection of environmental DNA (eDNA) is increasingly being used to infer species distributions, yet the sensitivity of the technique has not been fully evaluated. Sensitivity, or the probability of dete...
Article
The use of faecal DNA, although a promising tool for the population monitoring of mammals, has not yet become a fully exploited and standard practice, mainly because low target DNA concentration, DNA degradation, and co-purification of inhibitors demand extra laboratory procedures to improve success and reliability. Here we evaluate a simple method...
Article
Heather beetle (Lochmaea suturalis), has underperformed when compared with the damage it does to native heather in Europe. Mean heather beetle body size, measured by elytron area, was 10% smaller in NZ populations compared with beetles from northern UK where the NZ beetles originated. Previous research in Europe showed that small beetles suffer hig...
Article
Full-text available
The New Zealand native frogs, family Leiopelmatidae, are among the most archaic in the world. Leiopelma hochstetteri (Hochstetter's frog) is a small, semi-aquatic frog with numerous, fragmented populations scattered across New Zealand's North Island. We characterized a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II B gene (DAB) in L. hochstetteri...
Article
Full-text available
Release of captive bred individuals into the wild is now a conservation management approach to increase the depleted natural wildlife populations. Such method has been initiated for conservation of wild fish population on Qinghai Tibetan Plateau (QTP), a region of high level of species endemism. Platypharodon extremus is an endemic schizothoracine...
Article
Invasive, non-native species are one of the major causes of global biodiversity loss. Although they are, by definition, successful in their non-native range, their populations generally show major reductions in their genetic diversity during the demographic bottleneck they experience during colonization. By investigating the mitochondrial genetic d...
Article
Full-text available
Extrapair paternity (EPP) is purported to be an important contributor to the evolution of plumage dimorphism, and yet relatively few studies have demonstrated that EPP creates selection pressures on male traits. Sexual size dimorphism (SSD) is instead typically assumed to have evolved in association with polygyny rather than EPP. Yet, the New Zeala...
Presentation
Full-text available
Detailed species distribution data is essential prior to undertaking any management actions. However, this is often challenging for invasive fish species since traditional monitoring methods (i.e. electrofishing, fyke netting, bait trapping) are often biased and unable to accurately determine the extent of the invasion front (Porreca et al., 2013;...
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Article
Full-text available
Zokor (Mysopalacinae) is a group of subterranean rodents. Although they are regarded as important components in the ecosystems they belong to, due to their underground lifestyle, very little is known about their ecology and behavior. Development of microsatellite markers can potentially assist in addressing behavioral and ecological questions such...
Article
Full-text available
Seabirds are highly vagile yet many have restricted gene flow owing to physical barriers (e. g. land or ice) or non-physical barriers (e. g. philopatry), which often results in population divergence. Identification of distinct units is important for defining conservation status, guiding restoration of populations and coastal ecosystems, and managin...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
With the recent advent of molecular parentage analyses, many socially monogamous birds have now been proven to be promiscuous. Such extra-pair mating strategies are typically viewed as life history traits that have evolved in order to maximise fitness. The tui, Prosthemadera novaeseelandiae, is an iconic New Zealand endemic honeyeater (Meliphagidae...
Article
Full-text available
The endangered schizothoracine fish Gymnodiptychus pachycheilus is endemic to the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP), but very little genetic information is available for this species. Here, we accessed the current genetic divergence of G. pachycheilus population to evaluate their distributions modulated by contemporary and historical processes. Populat...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Monitoring species distributions and biodiversity is the fundamental basis for ecological studies and biodiversity management. Obtaining such detailed information is often difficult due to the limitations of current monitoring tools that are often time-consuming and expensive. Also, monitoring can be especially problematic from a management perspec...
Conference Paper
The use of environmental DNA (eDNA) is a relatively new indirect method of species detection. It offers several advantages over traditional detection techniques such as its sensitivity and that it does not require capture, handling or direct observation of the species of interest. Despite the rising interest on utilising eDNA and its potential appl...
Conference Paper
Environmental DNA (eDNA) shows great potential for detecting species at low density from environmental samples. Although eDNA is an indirect method of sampling, we assume that the presence of eDNA in an environmental sample indicates the presence of a target organism in the environment. Owing to the high sensitivity and specificity of eDNA detectio...