Diane van den Broek

Diane van den Broek
The University of Sydney · Discipline of Work and Organisational Studies

About

73
Publications
27,650
Reads
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1,127
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2012 - November 2015
The University of Sydney
Position
  • C0-Convenor Migrants@Work Research Group

Publications

Publications (73)
Article
Background Internationally educated nurses experience multidimensional challenges affecting their acculturation process in a foreign country. Cultural differences have been highlighted by research as a common barrier. There is a need to understand the cross-cultural challenges experienced by internationally educated nurses to promote a culturally i...
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Aim To identify and analyse the cultural attitudes, beliefs and practices of internationally educated nurses towards end‐of‐life care in the context of cancer. Background Cultural heritage shape beliefs and practices about cancer and end of life, which complicates nursing care delivery. While previous studies centred on diverse patients’ perspecti...
Article
This article exposes how disparity in the immigration rules of different visas combines with poor enforcement of labour standards to produce a segmented labour market in the Australian horticulture industry. We argue that the precarious work norms of the horticulture industry result in a ‘demand’ on the part of employers for harvest workers to perf...
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This article builds on the growing literature on migrant worker mobilisation by analysing how the temporary migrant workforce, employed in food production, interacts with two Australian trade unions alongside ethno-specific social media groups, offshore unions and community/religious organisations. The contribution of this article is twofold. First...
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The migration status of temporary migrant workers is often presented as a major determinant of labour rights and worker vulnerabilities. Using a sequential mixed method approach this article interrogates this proposition to examine the factors exacerbating temporary migrant worker exploitation within the Australian horticulture industry. The articl...
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Over recent decades, developments in network governance have seen governments around the world cede considerable authority and responsibility to commercial migration intermediaries for recruiting and managing temporary migrant labour. Correspondingly, a by-product of network governance has been the emergence of soft employment regulation in which v...
Article
The Australian horticulture industry, like its peers in most developed countries, faces significant labour supply challenges during the harvest season. Two regulatory initiatives seek to address this: the Seasonal Workers Programme and the second year extension on the Working Holiday visa. The latter has been far more widely used by horticulture em...
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Using a mixed-method analysis, this paper examines the effect of working holiday makers (WHMs) on the labour market for low-skilled work in the horticulture industry. Since the inception of the WHM visa in 1975, the horticulture industry has come to rely increasingly on WHMs as the core source of labour for picking and packing fruit and vegetables....
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Governments have increasingly commercialised their migration services, which has fuelled a mushrooming migration industry creating a ripe context for the central role of migration intermediaries. It is therefore timely to explore the new actors responsible for shaping contemporary flows of skilled migration. Drawing on the work of existing studies...
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This article extends an understanding of how the embodied nature of work, in this case nursing work, is reformed by workplace technologies. It outlines how technological advancements helped to partially restore the physical and psychological perforations inflicted on those performing nursing work. However, the transitions to remote nursing analysed...
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For governments concerned with enhancing labour market efficiency, employer-sponsored temporary labour migration schemes have become increasingly popular. However, the equity implications of these arrangements, which constrain the mobility of migrant workers, have largely been ignored. This paper assesses the factors affecting the vulnerability of...
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Discussion of skilled migration often focuses on skill shortages and global labour market trends, with little attention directed to the individual experiences of the migrants themselves. ?Divina? is a migrant nurse who left her home country of the Philippines to gain work in Australia. In the process of this migration, Divina was drawn into a compl...
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This article re-analyses 105 interviews from four qualitative research studies of different kinds of care workers in Canada and Australia, in light of deepening workplace rationalisation and austerity. The sample included: two studies of voluntary sector social service and social workers—one study of nineteen and one of twenty social workers, twent...
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Like all migration, skilled migration depends on intermediary operators that provide services that assist the mobility, labour market entry and integration of migrant workers. However within what is a relatively disparate body of literature on migrant work, there is often either a complete neglect, or only fragmented acknowledgement and analysis of...
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Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the Gender and Diversity Stream, Standing Working Group (SWG) at the recent European Group of Organisational Studies (EGOS) Colloquium, which was hosted in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. The paper provides an overview of the SWG before turning to the scope of the papers and a brief synop...
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Market liberalisation has fundamentally changed state interventions in the supply of services and supportive infrastructure across a range of public services. While this trend has been relatively well documented, there has been a dearth of research into the changing nature of state interventions in migration and mobility. Indeed the increasing pres...
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In 2004, American businesswoman and television celebrity Martha Stewart was imprisoned for insider trading. By 2005, she was reinstalled in her television world of promoting domestic fantasy and class mobility through her products. Her 17 February 2011 show titled ‘Redo, Renew and Recycle’ (as well as including ‘bathroom make-over ideas’ and a ‘lea...
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During the past decade, Vietnam has transitioned from a highly regulated and authoritarian system to a more market-oriented economy. During this period, Vietnam has also experienced unprecedented levels of industrial action. Informal wildcat strikes, as well as high labour turnover and absenteeism, were most apparent in foreign firms within specifi...
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Drawing on archival data of employment discrimination from the Victorian Equal Opportunity and Human Rights Commission in Australia, this article examines the issue of employee looks, women and lookism in interactive service work. From existing research on emotional and aesthetic labour, lookism might be expected to occur primarily in services and...
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The term ‘aesthetic labour’ has come to describe the recruitment, selection, development and deployment of physical and presentational attributes geared towards ‘looking good and sounding right’ (Warhurst and Nickson, 2007: 104). Further research has identified a degree of stratification within interactive service work, with further distinctions de...
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There has been significant development in the way industrial conflict and worker resistance has been analysed over the past fifteen years. While researchers have observed the quantitative decline of traditional forms of employee resistance, others have highlighted the diversity and range of more informal employee behaviours. As indicated below, the...
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Purpose – The chapter analyses potential interconnections between competing strands of worker misbehavior and mischief that result in forms of active resistance for those workers employed in nonunion settings. Design/methodology/approach – The analysis integrates extant literature and theory concerned with differences between resistance, mischief a...
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In nineteenth-century Australia a 'career' in banking depended on one's technical ability, including a way with figures, good penmanship and attention to detail. However social and cultural factors were also considered equally important. To ensure the recruitment and promotion of trustworthy, dependable and committed staff, banks recruited and prom...
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Discussions about deunionisation usually focus on lower levels of the workforce with managers seen as the initiators of deunionisation strategies. Managers, however, occupy contradictory positions as agents of capital, employees and possibly trade unionists. This can place them in the position of being both recipients and conduits in deunionisation...
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Discussions about deunionisation usually focus on lower levels of the workforce with managers seen as the initiators of deunionisation strategies. Managers, however, occupy contradictory positions as agents of capital, employees and possibly trade unionists. This can place them in the position of being both recipients and conduits in deunionisation...
Article
Telework as a ‘flexible work practice’ is often mythologised as a revolutionary form of work. However, to varying degrees, teleworking opportunities have been undermined by policy instruments predicated on assumed equalities between economic actors. This research suggests that while the request-based policies in the UK are not a guaranteed right, t...
Chapter
Employment relations envelop a set of material practices and a way of looking at those practices. Both are dynamic; what is regarded as a feature of employment relations and how those employment relations are studied changes over time. For example, if employees were once paid ‘danger money’, now there are health and safety regulations to minimize w...
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Managerial control and its wider setting in workplace and societal regimes has been an important feature of debates in Work, Employment and Society since its inception, providing some of its most highly cited articles. This Introduction to the first e-special seeks to present 10 key and diverse articles, situating them in the context of debates ins...
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On-going class action against America Online's use of ‘free labour’ has divided opinion about the management of ‘digital’ labour in the ‘new’ economy. Web-based systems of collaboration between and within firms and their customers, as well as customer engagement in product innovation, have underscored claims about the evaporation of traditional lab...
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A key feature of new public management is the tendency to equate quality and accountability with documentation (Tsui and Cheung, 2004). Human service organizations increasingly rely on computer databases to compile and record client information and to demonstrate outcomes for quality assurance and accountability purposes. This has resulted in subst...
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One of the outstanding features of contemporary Australian industrial relations has been the dramatic growth in employer de-collectivization strategies. Four dimensions of employer strategies, sometimes interlinked and overlapping, are identified and analyzed in this article—employer lockouts, individualization of bargaining, counters to organizing...
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The nature of call centre 'logics' and their predominance in routine commercial areas of the economy underscored much of the early research into call centre operations. Recent regulatory, structural and technological developments in advanced economies underscored subsequent migrations of call centres from the private to the public sector c Glucksma...
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Call centre work is highly individualistic and technologically regulated. Processes, scripts and company procedures are usually standardized. As such there is a fundamental irony in the fact that most call centre operations organize their workforce around team structures. In recent years, much of the research has identified how teams might lead to...
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By the late 1990s, service industries had come to dominate economic activity in most OECD countries including the USA, France, Denmark and Belgium. In 2001 in Australia, services accounted for more than 70 per cent of economic activity and more than three-quarters ($419 billion) of the total output of the economy. Indeed service industries employed...
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Managing culture has been central to management theory and practice, with middle managers representing an important conduit for change initiatives. However, within the context of significant rationalisation and privatisation, cultural change programs spearheaded by corporate management may not always resonate favourably for individual managers. Thi...
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Call centres are evidently an inhospitable environment for teams given a work design based on individualized, largely routine work regulated heavily by technology and managerial scripts. The article explores a number of potential explanations for this paradox in the context of comparable case studies from the UK and Australia. The case studies conf...
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This article analyses the use of normative control through recruitment, work organisation, social events, and bargaining processes within two Australian telecommunication call centres. Rather than arguing that such control reduced employees to 'self-disciplining subjects', it suggests that these control mechanisms embodied significant levels of man...
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Corporate restructuring has changed the nature and location of work as well as nations, communities, and families. Such restructuring of industrial traditions, based on specific industries and phases of capital mobility, are shaped by and shape spatially identifiable family, class, and gender relations and political beliefs. Just as industries rest...
Chapter
Much of the literature on call centres focuses on work organization and surveillance. While this is valuable in its own right, issues of recruitment and socialization of labour tend to be neglected. In our case companies there is considerable evidence for the primacy accorded to the identification and shaping of social competencies as integral to i...
Chapter
Industrial restructuring, technological change and a greater interest in new management practices have focused attention on the shift from an industrial to ‘post-industrial’ or ‘knowledge economy’. Within this broader rubric of organizational and social change, there has been considerable debate about how labour is managed and the causes, nature an...
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Recruitment processes are seen as critical to the success of contemporary organizations and integral to human resource practices, particularly in those firms setting up greenfield operations or undertaking organizational change programs. This article analyses the recruitment methods used in several large call centres in the Australian telecommunica...
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The call centre industry has grown rapidly both in Australia and overseas. Research on the industry has been wide-ranging, with one strand of the research involving a reassessment of labour process debates about managerial control and employee resistance. This reassessment has been partially sparked by the distinct technological features of call ce...
Article
Workplaces Fit For Citizens? Workplace Democracy and the Future of the Labour Movement: a conference to mark the centenary of Dr Lloyd Ross, labour intellectual and trade unionist, 1901-1987, Friday 1 June 2001 - organised by the Labor Council of New South Wales and Work and Organisational Studies, University of Sydney.
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Non-union industrial relations bas generated increasing interest among researchers both in Australia and overseas. Changes in public policy toward a more deregulated and individualised industrial relations system, as well as increasing employer interest in techniques associated witb human resource management, have become closely linked with the ris...
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Women's involvement in trade unions and their direct participation in industrial action has been the subject of growing interest for labour historians and industrial relations scholars. Some research has also concentrated on women's indirect participation in paid work. However just as this field of investigation has made inroads into the study of l...
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Women's involvement in trade unions and their direct participation in industrial action has been the subject of growing interest for labour historians and industrial relations scholars. Some research has also concentrated on women's indirect participation to paid work. However just as this field of investigation has made inroads into the study of l...
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Managerial attempts to control time are often predicated on an assumption that time is absolute and objective. Yet an examination of the way that time is constructed in the retail banking industry shows that time is highly elastic and subjective (Mainemelis 2001). Management may place an emphasis on time discipline and predictability through the us...
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Human service organisations are increasingly relying on computer data bases to compile and record client information and to demonstrate outcomes for accountability purposes. This has resulted in substantial changes in work practices, processes and relationships for human service workers. This paper draws on interview data from practitioners in a ra...

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Projects (2)
Project
This project examines collective responses which have emerged following the rapid growth in temporary migrant workers in Australia. We will look at union responses, as well as collective responses by temporary migrant workers that have evolved outside of traditional union structured.