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Diane McKay

Diane McKay
Tufts University | Tufts · Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy

PhD

About

58
Publications
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4,038
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Publications

Publications (58)
Article
Recent dietary reference intake workshops focusing on nutrient requirements in chronic disease populations have called attention to the potential adverse effects of chronic medication use on micronutrient status. Although this topic is mostly ill defined in the literature, several noteworthy drug–nutrient interactions (DNIs) are of clinical and pub...
Article
Polypharmacy regimens may increase the susceptibility of older adults to micronutrient inadequacy and deficiency via impairment of nutritional status. We hypothesized that a multi-vitamin-mineral supplement (MVMS) could improve nutritional status in older adults prescribed diuretics, metformin, and/or proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). We conducted a r...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: We studied the health benefits of low calorie cranberry beverage consumption on glucoregulation, oxidative damage, inflammation, and lipid metabolism in overweight but otherwise healthy humans. Methods: 78 overweight or obese men and women (30-70 years; BMI 27-35 kg/m2) with abdominal adiposity (waist: hip > 0.8 for women and > 0.9 for...
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The long-term use of prescription and over-the-counter drugs can induce subclinical and clinically relevant micronutrient deficiencies, which may develop gradually over months or even years. Given the large number of medications currently available, the number of research studies examining potential drug–nutrient interactions is quite limited. A co...
Article
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Evidence from observational and intervention studies has shown a high intake of tree nuts is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), mortality from type 2 diabetes (T2DM), and all-cause mortality. However, there is limited data regarding their effects on indicators of cardiometabolic risk other than hypercholesterolemia, and...
Article
Oat avenanthramides (AVAs) are a group of phenolic alkaloids, consisting of an anthranilic acid and a hydroxycinnamic acid linked by a pseudo-peptide bond. Bioavailability of AVA is poor in humans, suggesting transformations for rapid excretion. Thus, we aim to identify metabolites of AVA isomers in plasma of humans after consuming AVA-enriched oat...
Article
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While dietary fiber plays an important role in the health benefits associated with whole grain consumption, other ingredients concentrated in the outer bran layer, including alkylresorcinols, lignans, phenolic acids, phytosterols, and tocols, may also contribute to these outcomes. To determine the acute bioavailability and pharmacokinetics of the m...
Chapter
Cranberries have long been used as a part of traditional and folk medicine.
Article
The lack of a biomarker for the consumption of cranberries has confounded the interpretation of several studies investigating the effect of cranberry products, especially juices, on health outcomes. The objectives of this pilot study were to develop a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometric method for the quantification of the proanthocyani...
Article
Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States and other developed countries, and is fast growing in developing countries, particularly as life expectancy in all parts of the world increases. Current recommendations for the prevention of cardiovascular diseaseissued jointly from the American Academy...
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In our efforts to understand how various dietary factors can influence the risk and progression of chronic disease, much recent research has focused on phytochemicals. Phytochemicals are defined as nonessential nutrients found in plant-based food, many of which have been established as bioactive and thus may affect human health. The largest group o...
Article
Cited By (since 1996):12, Export Date: 23 March 2014, Source: Scopus
Article
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Tree nuts contain an array of phytochemicals including carotenoids, phenolic acids, phytosterols and polyphenolic compounds such as flavonoids, proanthocyanidins (PAC) and stilbenes, all of which are included in nutrient databases, as well as phytates, sphingolipids, alkylphenols and lignans, which are not. The phytochemical content of tree nuts ca...
Chapter
IntroductionBlack, oolong and green tea (C. sinensis)Other teas and tisanesSummary and conclusionsReferences
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Compared with other common plant foods, walnuts (Juglans regia) are consistently ranked among the highest in antioxidant capacity. In vitro, walnut polyphenols inhibit plasma and LDL oxidation, while in animal models they lower biomarkers of oxidative stress and raise antioxidant capacity. A limited number of human feeding trials indicate that waln...
Article
The antioxidant and quinone reductase (QR) inducing activities of American, Asian, and Siberian ginseng have been reported using various plant materials, solvents, and assays. To directly establish their comparative bioactivity, the effects of extracts obtained from acidified methanol (MeOH), a gastrointestinal mimic (GI), and hexane (Hex) on free...
Article
In addition to being a rich source of several essential vitamins and minerals, mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids, and fiber, most tree nuts provide an array of phytochemicals that may contribute to the health benefits attributed to this whole food. Although many of these constituents remain to be fully identified and characterized, broad classe...
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Full-text available
In vitro studies show Hibiscus sabdariffa L., an ingredient found in many herbal tea blends and other beverages, has antioxidant properties, and, in animal models, extracts of its calyces have demonstrated hypocholesterolemic and antihypertensive properties. Our objective in this study was to examine the antihypertensive effects of H. sabdariffa ti...
Article
Hibiscus sabdariffa is a common ingredient found in blended herbal teas, and beverages made from the dried calyces of this plant are popular worldwide. In vitro studies have shown that H. sabdariffa has antioxidant properties and, in animal models of hypertension, extracts of this plant lower blood pressure. Its anti-hypertensive effects have also...
Article
Several large observational studies have suggested that vitamin E supplementation lowers the risk of coronary heart disease. However, the results of large randomized controlled trials failed to show a clear benefit of α-tocopherol supplementation on cardiovascular outcomes. In this study, supplementation with high-, medium-, and low-doses of α-toco...
Article
The American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) is one of the three commercially important fruits native to North America. Cranberries are a particularly rich source of phenolic phytochemicals, including phenolic acids (benzoic, hydroxycinnamic, and ellagic acids) and flavonoids (anthocyanins, flavonols, and flavan-3-ols). A growing body of evidence...
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After water, tea from Camellia sinensis is the most consumed beverage worldwide. Tea is rich in catechin flavonoids that possess an array of bioactivity including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, apoptotic, and probiotic mechanisms of action that may contribute to some of the putative health benefits associated with tea intake. A substantial body of...
Article
Rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) and honeybush (Cyclopia intermedia) are popular tisanes in their native South Africa and have a growing worldwide market. Both herbal teas are used traditionally for medicinal purposes and are rich in polyphenols with rooibos a rare source of the dietary dihydrochalcones, aspalathin and nothofagin. The principal polyph...
Article
Peppermint (Mentha piperita L.) is one of the most widely consumed single ingredient herbal teas, or tisanes. Peppermint tea, brewed from the plant leaves, and the essential oil of peppermint are used in traditional medicines. Evidence-based research regarding the bioactivity of this herb is reviewed. The phenolic constituents of the leaves include...
Article
Education level, more than any other socioeconomic factor, can predict disease risk, health behavior patterns, and diet quality. It has been suggested that one reason higher education promotes more healthful diets is that better-educated people may get better nutrition information. We present data from a survey examining specific sources of nutriti...
Article
Chamomile (Matricaria recutita L., Chamomilla recutita L., Matricaria chamomilla) is one of the most popular single ingredient herbal teas, or tisanes. Chamomile tea, brewed from dried flower heads, has been used traditionally for medicinal purposes. Evidence-based information regarding the bioactivity of this herb is presented. The main constituen...
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Full-text available
Improving the effectiveness of written information to promote compliance with therapeutic regimens is essential, particularly among older adults. Guiding their development and evaluating their effectiveness with an accepted communication theory or model may help. A preliminary test of written materials developed within the context of the Extended P...
Article
Full-text available
Tea is an important dietary source of flavanols and flavonols. In vitro and animal studies provide strong evidence that tea polyphenols may possess the bioactivity to affect the pathogenesis of several chronic diseases, especially cardiovascular disease and cancer. However, the results from epidemiological and clinical studies of the relationship b...
Article
Tea is an important dietary source of flavanols and flavonols. In vitro and animal studies provide strong evidence that tea polyphenols may possess the bioactivity to affect the pathogenesis of several chronic diseases, especially cardiovascular disease and cancer. However, the results from epidemiological and clinical studies of the relationship b...
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Full-text available
Elevated homocysteine has been identified as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. Although multivitamin use has been associated with low plasma homocysteine concentrations in several observational studies, no clinical trials have been conducted using multivitamin/mineral supplements to lower homocysteine. We de...
Article
Full-text available
Inadequate micronutrient intake among older adults is common despite the increased prevalence of fortified/enriched foods in the American diet. Although many older adults take multivitamin supplements in an effort to compensate, studies examining the benefits of this behavior are absent. To determine whether a daily multivitamin/mineral supplement...
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Full-text available
We have cloned and sequenced the gene for DNA ligase from Thermus thermophilus. A comparison of this sequence and those of other ligases reveals significant homology only with that of Escherichia coli. The overall amino acid composition of the thermophilic ligase and the pattern of amino acid substitutions between the two proteins are consistent wi...

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