Diane Coyle

Diane Coyle
The University of Manchester · Department of Economics

PhD

About

46
Publications
7,950
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
845
Citations

Publications

Publications (46)
Article
The UK faces two significant economic challenges in the years ahead: Brexit, and digital disruption. They are likely to reinforce each other. Although there are largely separate public debates about each, businesses, policymakers and citizens will have to deal with both at the same time. To make matters worse, they are going to interact in challeng...
Article
Critics of economics often highlight two related issues: the empirical falsity of the ‘homo economicus’ assumption of rational, self-interested maximisation; and the ethical consequences of models based on this assumption. Yet many experiments in biology show non-human creatures often seem to behave as if they were rational maximisers, suggesting t...
Article
Part of the debate about the ‘productivity puzzle’ concerns potential mismeasurement of GDP due to digital activities. This paper discusses some measurement issues arising from digitally‐enabled substitutions in activity across the conventional production boundary. Production boundary issues are not new, as conventionally defined GDP statistics acc...
Article
Discover deep and illuminating summer reads picked by our regular reviewers, leagues away from lab and lecture hall. Discover deep and illuminating summer reads picked by our regular reviewers, leagues away from lab and lecture hall. An illustration of a woman sliding down a climbing rope towards huge books at the bottom. In her hand she holds a pi...
Article
Philipp Lepenies, The Power of a Single Number: A Political History of GDP (New York: Columbia University Press, 2016), pp. 208, $30. ISBN: 978-0-23117-510-4. - Diane Coyle
Article
Digital platforms have the potential to create benefits for their suppliers or workers as well as their customers, yet there is a heated debate about the character of this work and whether the platforms should be more heavily regulated. Beyond the high-profile global platforms, the technology is contributing to changing patterns of work. Yet the ex...
Article
Full-text available
As labs and lecture halls empty, go out of this world with our regular reviewers' recommendations for stellar holiday reading.
Article
Diane Coyle savours a history of the long-standing economic measure and possible alternatives.
Article
The OECD Observer, OECD's quarterly magazine presents concise, up-to-date and authoritative analysis of crucial world economic and social issues. Through the pages of the Observer OECD’s experts offer insights on the questions facing the Organisation’s member governments and provide an excellent opportunity for readers to stay ahead of policy debat...
Article
Full-text available
This paper gives an overview of the activities of Airbnb in 14 European cities. Since Airbnb provides an online accommodation platform linking property owners and visitors, it could potentially affect both the hotel market and the domestic rental market in the localities in which it operates. We discuss the structure and the segmentation of the acc...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
1. Telling a story Public debate about the main economic indicators, including GDP and the rest of the National Accounts, is a matter of politics, not just statistics. Politicians use the published statistics to tell their story, to persuade voters and 'stakeholders' that some things and not others are true about the state of the economy, or the st...
Article
Official statistics, particularly GDP and its growth rate, are an important means for citizens to hold their governments to account. However, this democratic conversation (and even economic research) rarely acknowledge the large degree of uncertainty and revision of the statistics. Moreover, the national accounts are of decreasing relevance to econ...
Article
Remarkably, the most serious financial crisis in living memory has had few political consequences. Diane Coyle argues that one of the reasons is a method of calculating GDP that overstates the value of the financial sector to the UK economy, helping to shield it from sensible reforms.
Article
Why did the size of the U.S. economy increase by 3 percent on one day in mid-2013-or Ghana's balloon by 60 percent overnight in 2010? Why did the U.K. financial industry show its fastest expansion ever at the end of 2008-just as the world's financial system went into meltdown? And why was Greece's chief statistician charged with treason in 2013 for...
Article
Economic policy can achieve results only if policymakers -and the voters to whom they are accountable-know what is happening to the economy. Understanding the economy as a whole depends on the available statistics. So economic statistics shape policy and events, and the most closely watched measure is the growth of gross domestic product (GDP).
Article
This special issue collects papers presented at the EIPE Conference ‘Economics Made Fun in the Face of the Economic Crisis’ held on 10–11 December 2010 in Rotterdam. The central theme of the conference was the tension between the bold claim in Economics Made Fun books that economics can explain the hidden side of everything and the apparent failure...
Article
How can market-based solutions help solve the challenges of immigration? Nobel Prize winner Prof. Gary Becker, in this IEA Occasional Paper, proposes a radical policy which, if implemented by the coalition government, could raise over £600 million a year.Prof. Becker proposes that visas to work in the UK should be sold off. The coalition’s immigrat...
Article
Full-text available
In October 2010, a group of leading thinkers on environmental policy met at the Sustainable Consumption Institute at the University of Manchester for a conference in honour of Nobel Laureate Tom Schelling. This column presents a 10-point guideline for climate change policy co-authored by 26 attendees that focuses on designing policies that are cred...
Article
The world's leading economies are facing not just one but many crises. The financial meltdown may not be over, climate change threatens major global disruption, economic inequality has reached extremes not seen for a century, and government and business are widely distrusted. At the same time, many people regret the consumerism and social corrosion...
Article
Immigration into the UK has increased in response to high labour demand in the recent past. This additional supply of labour has helped keep interest rates lower, and growth higher, than they might have been otherwise. The longer-term impact of higher immigration may be an increase in trend productivity growth. Although the evidence on such long-te...
Article
Full-text available
There has been an unprecedented political focus on economic development and poverty reductions since the Gleneagles Summit of 2005, yet it seems economists have been unable to agree on how to capitalise on the opportunity. Is more aid the solution? Or the problem? This article argues that, beyond the headline-grabbing generalities, development econ...
Article
Full-text available
To many, Thomas Carlyle's put-down of economics as "the dismal science" is as fitting now as it was 150 years ago. But Diane Coyle argues that economics today is more soulful than dismal, a more practical and human science than ever before. Building on the popularity of books such as Freakonomics that have applied economic thinking to the paradoxes...
Book
The Weightless World is the first book to map an economic world that has been turned upside down by digital technology and global business. How will our careers, businesses, and governments change in a world where bytes are the only currency and where the goods that shape our lives—global financial transactions, computer code, and cyberspace commer...
Article
Full-text available
We establish that the recursive, state-space methods of Kalman filtering and smoothing can be used to implement the Doan, Litterman, and Sims (1983) approach to econometric forecast and policy evaluation. Compared with the methods outlined in Doan, Litterman, and Sims, the Kalman algorithms are more easily programmed and modified to incorporate dif...
Article
The Centre for Economic Policy Research is a network of over 580 Research Fellows and Affiliates, based primarily in European universities. The Centre coordinates the research activities of its Fellows and Affiliates and communicates the results to the public and private sectors. CEPR is an entrepreneur, developing research initiatives with the pro...
Article
Traducción de: Sex, Drugs and Economics: An Unconventional Introduction to Economics Obra que es una introducción a los grandes conceptos y preocupaciones de la ciencia económica, pero aplicados a campos diversos de la vida -como lo anuncia el título- con el fin de volverla más accesible y amena.

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Public Expenditure Planning and Control in Complex Times: A Study of Whitehall Departments’ Relationship to the Treasury (1993-Present) is a Nuffield Foundation funded project that seeks to explore a potential paradox to emerge over recent decades in the British system of government - centralised financial control in an era of fragmentation within the governing process. It examines public expenditure coordination, control and delivery between HM Treasury, Whitehall government departments and their delivery agents from 1993 to the present day, examining the challenges to achieving effective financial control of public expenditure. This project will explore this tension, from the perspective of departments and their delivery agents, and its impact on the Treasury’s capacity to maintain effective expenditure control. It will focus on four Whitehall departments: Education, Work and Pensions, the Home Office and the Ministry of Justice (and their predecessors). It will investigate how Treasury’s mechanisms of financial control have been interpreted and responded to, whether and how this has led to the emergence of ‘implementation gaps’ between policy intention and delivery, and pinpoint key junctures where expenditure controls have succeeded or failed. The research will provide a better understanding of the complexity of financial control in an age of fragmented governance and offer lessons for parliamentarians and policymakers for developing mechanisms better suited to complex, interagency networks of delivery. The project is led by Professor David Richards in the Department of Politics, University of Manchester. The co-investigators are Professor Diane Coyle, University of Cambridge and Professor Martin Smith, University of York. Dr Sam Warner, University of Manchester is the Research Officer on the project