Diane K Brockman

Diane K Brockman
University of North Carolina at Charlotte | UNC Charlotte · Department of Anthropology

Ph.D. Yale University

About

45
Publications
16,475
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2,202
Citations
Additional affiliations
July 2016 - November 2017
University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Position
  • Professor

Publications

Publications (45)
Article
Earth's rapidly changing climate creates a growing need to understand how demographic processes in natural populations are affected by climate variability, particularly among organisms threatened by extinction. Long-term, large-scale, and cross-taxon studies of vital rate variation in relation to climate variability can be particularly valuable bec...
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Significance Public interest in social and economic equality is burgeoning. We examine a related phenomenon, lifespan equality, using data from charismatic primate populations and diverse human populations. Our study reveals three key findings. First, lifespan equality rises in lockstep with life expectancy, across primate species separated by mill...
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We provide male and female census count data, age-specific survivorship, and female age-specific fertility estimates for populations of seven wild primates that have been continuously monitored for at least 29 years: sifaka (Propithecus verreauxi) in Madagascar; muriqui (Brachyteles hypoxanthus) in Brazil; capuchin (Cebus capucinus) in Costa Rica;...
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Women rarely give birth after ∼45 y of age, and they experience the cessation of reproductive cycles, menopause, at ∼50 y of age after a fertility decline lasting almost two decades. Such reproductive senescence in mid-lifespan is an evolutionary puzzle of enduring interest because it should be inherently disadvantageous. Furthermore, comparative d...
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The Beza Mahafaly Project in southwestern Madagascar was founded in 1975. It was established as a collaborative effort among the University of Madagascar (now University of Antananarivo), Washington University, Yale University, and the local communities for long-term training and research, biodiversity conservation, and socioeconomic development. B...
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Human senescence patterns-late onset of mortality increase, slow mortality acceleration, and exceptional longevity-are often described as unique in the animal world. Using an individual-based data set from longitudinal studies of wild populations of seven primate species, we show that contrary to assumptions of human uniqueness, human senescence fa...
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In a stochastic environment, long-term fitness can be influenced by variation, covariation, and serial correlation in vital rates (survival and fertility). Yet no study of an animal population has parsed the contributions of these three aspects of variability to long-term fitness. We do so using a unique database that includes complete life-history...
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1. The importance of data archiving, data sharing and public access to data has received considerable attention. Awareness is growing among scientists that collaborative databases can facilitate these activities. 2. We provide a detailed description of the collaborative life history database developed by our Working Group at the National Evolutiona...
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The responses of plural breeding mammals to environmental stressors are little understood in free-ranging populations, but recent studies of singular breeders suggest that ecological factors and social milieu influence the variable physiological stress responses observed among individuals. Our previous studies examining faecal glucocorticoid (fGC)-...
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Humans residing in "dioxin hotspots" of Vietnam have markedly elevated serum dioxin (TCDD) levels, but no comparable data exist on the other mammals in those areas. The long-term goal of this research is to assess the role of TCDD (Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin) in the health of endangered primates inhabiting "dioxin hotspots," in southern Vietnam. T...
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Chemical deterioration of teeth is common among modern humans, and has been suggested for some extinct primates. Dental erosion caused by acidic foods may also obscure microwear signals of mechanical food properties. Ring-tailed lemurs at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve (BMSR), Madagascar, display frequent severe tooth wear and subsequent tooth l...
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Increasing evidence supports the idea that endemic avian and mammalian predators have profoundly impacted primate populations in Madagascar (Goodman, S. M. Predation on lemurs. In S. M. Goodman, & J. P. Benstead (Eds.), The natural history of Madagascar (pp. 1221–1228). Chicago: University of Chicago Press, (2003).). The role in regulating lemur po...
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Alloparental behavior is documented for several anthropoid primates, but few researchers have investigated the extent or variability of such behavior in prosimians. We report results from a study of male-infant interactions in 2 groups of Coquerel’s sifaka (Propithecus verreauxi coquereli) at the Duke University Primate Center (DUPC). Both groups c...
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The emergence of the genus Homo is widely linked to the colonization of 'new' highly seasonal savannah habitats. However, until recently, our understanding of the possible impact of seasonality on this shift has been limited because we have little general knowledge of how seasonality affects the lives of primates. This 2005 book documents the exten...
Chapter
Full-text available
The emergence of the genus Homo is widely linked to the colonization of 'new' highly seasonal savannah habitats. However, until recently, our understanding of the possible impact of seasonality on this shift has been limited because we have little general knowledge of how seasonality affects the lives of primates. This 2005 book documents the exten...
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Full-text available
Observations of raptor predation on lemurs are rare [reviewed in Goodman et al., 1993], but indirect evidence derived from raptor prey remains [Karpanty and Goodman, 1999; Thorstrom and La Marca, 2000], raptor pellets [Goodman et al., 1993], and vocal/behavioral responses to potential avian and terrestrial predators [Sauther, 1989; Karpanty and...
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Previous research suggests that although reproduction and testicular function in wild sifaka (Propithecus verreauxi) are highly seasonal, birth season elevations in fecal testosterone (T) in transferring males indicate that social factors may be as important as climatic factors in regulating reproductive function in sifaka. This paper examines the...
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Prosimian and anthropoid females are generally thought to have divergent reproductive patterns, characterized by circumscribed and situation-dependent receptivity. This dichotomy underpins the traditional view that nonreproductive mating serves a social function in anthropoid females, distinguishing them from prosimians which, like most other mamma...
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This paper reviews recent advances in field endocrinology, a focus as well as a method in primatology and behavioral ecology that permits the examination of social behavior and life history through hormonal investigations in natural settings. Endocrine data complements the traditional behavioral data collected by field scientists by providing quant...
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Endocrine studies of captive strepsirrhine primates suggest that physical environment and social factors mediate inter-individual variations in testicular function and serum testosterone (sT) in males. While these studies have made major contributions to our understanding of the individual proximate mechanisms influencing androgen activity in male...
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Female sifaka mate selectively with one or more resident and/or non-resident males during the breeding season. Various adaptive explanations have been advanced to explain why female primates mate with multiple males including that 1) females seek to confuse paternity and thereby forestall male infanticide and/or ensure male infant care or 2) female...
Article
Female sifaka mate selectively with one or more resident and/or non-resident males during the breeding season. Various adaptive explanations have been advanced to explain why female primates mate with multiple males including that 1) females seek to confuse paternity and thereby forestall male infanticide and/or ensure male infant care or 2) female...
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Solid phase extraction, high performance liquid chromatography, and radioimmunoassay were used to test the validity of fecal steroid analysis for assessing ovarian function in sifaka (Propithecus verreauxi). Daily fecal samples were collected over a 4 month period from two cycling female sifaka, and single samples were collected from females during...
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A review of the captive history and status ofVarecia is presented followed by specific management recommendations for bothVarecia v. variegata andVarecia v. rubra. The total living captive population for the nominate form numbers 398 animals while that for the red and black form numbers 148 individuals as of 31 December 1986.Varecia v. variegata is...
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Medical aspects of maintaining the ruffed lemurs, Varecia variegata, at the San Diego Zoo and recommendations for population management of the species are presented. Common clinical problems include diarrhea, hair balls, chapped feet in young animals, and canine-tooth abscesses. Congenital abnormalities in animals at San Diego involve scoliosis, in...
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Detailed descriptions of ruffed lemur reproductive biology and behavior are presented, including data on pregnancy, parturition, litter size, and infant care. As with various other prosimians, ruffed lemurs are reproductively photosensitive and seasonally polyestrous. Litters of one to six infants are born from March through July after a gestation...
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The captive history of the ruffed lemur is presented with concentration on taxonomy, captive population and husbandry of the San Diego Zoo population. At the conclusion of 1985, the living population of black and white ruffed lemurs numbered 358; red ruffed lemurs totaled 125. The San Diego Zoo population, established between 1965 and 1970, began w...
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Detailed) descriptions of ruffed lemur reproductive biology and behavior are presented, including data on pregnancy, parturition, litter size, and infant care. As with various other prosirriians, ruffed lemurs are reproductively photosensitive and seasonally polyestrol}s. Litters of one to six infants are born from March through July after a gestat...
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During a 2-week period, 3 hanuman langurs (Presbytis entellus) died from severe fibrinopurulent and proliferative peritonitis. Partially digested plant material was identified in the necrotic abdominal debris of the 1st and 2nd langurs. In the 3rd, a phytobezoar that extended 17.5 cm distally from the pyloric area had caused a 1-cm perforation. Sev...

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