Diana Forker

Diana Forker
Friedrich Schiller University Jena | FSU · Institut of Slavonic and Caucasian Studies

Doctor of Philosophy

About

63
Publications
6,529
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260
Citations
Citations since 2016
37 Research Items
230 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060

Publications

Publications (63)
Article
Full-text available
This paper is concerned with the relationship between complexity and variation. The main goal is to lay out the conceptual foundations and to develop and systematize reasonable hypotheses such as to set out concrete research questions for future investigations. I first compare how complexity and variation have synchronically been studied and what k...
Book
The former Soviet Union (USSR) provides the ideal territory for studying language contact between one and the same dominant language (Russian) and a wide range of genealogically and typologically diverse languages with varying histories of language contact. This is the first book that bundles different case studies and systematically investigates t...
Article
Purpose This study examines the integration of Russian verbs into 50 languages from 12 different language families predominantly spoken in the former Soviet Union with respect to insertion strategies and input forms of Russian verbs. The aim is to test if there are statistically significant distributions between particular insertion strategies and...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper I study semantic and pragmatic properties of elevational demonstratives by means of a typological investigation of 50 languages with elevational demonstratives from all across the globe. The four basic verticality values expressed by elevational demonstratives are UP, DOWN, LEVEL, and ACROSS. They can be ordered along the elevational...
Article
Modal particles have been intensively studied in German and a few other European languages, but investigations of modal particles from little-known languages are rare. This paper examines in detail the morphosyntactic and the semantic properties of the Sanzhi Dargwa (Nakh-Daghestanian) modal particle = q’al . It is shown that the particle possesses...
Book
Sanzhi Dargwa belongs to the Dargwa (Dargi) languages (ISO dar; Glottocode sanz1248) which form a subgroup of the East Caucasian (Nakh-Dagestanian) language family. Sanzhi Dargwa is spoken by approximately 250 speakers and is severely endangered. This book is the first comprehensive descriptive grammar of Sanzhi, written from a typological perspect...
Article
Nakh-Daghestanian languages have encountered growing interest from typologists and linguists from other subdiscplines, and more and more languages from the Nakh-Daghestanian language family are being studied. This paper provides a grammatical overview of the hitherto undescribed Sanzhi Dargwa language, followed by a detailed analysis of the grammat...
Article
Full-text available
This paper investigates the impact of language contact on the Nakh-Daghestanian language Hinuq. Hinuq is a rather small language that has been in contact with larger languages for several centuries; among them the traces of Avar and Russian are particularly visible. The paper provides an overview about all observable influences on the phonology, mo...
Article
Full-text available
This paper treats bridging constructions in the Tsezic languages (Bezhta, Hunzib, Khwarshi, Hinuq, and Tsez) of the Nakh-Daghestanian language family. We describe the syntactic and semantic properties of bridging constructions based on corpus data from all five Tsezic languages. Bridging constructions are defined as bipartite constructions that con...
Chapter
This article addresses affective ("experiencer") constructions in the Tsezic languages (Nakh-Daghestanian), which represent the most frequent type of non-canonical subject constructions in these languages. They differ from transitive constructions in a number of ways that go far beyond case marking and affect various domains of grammar (e.g. inflec...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose The study represents the first attempt to analyze intrasentantial code switching in an indigenous language from the Caucasus (the Nakh- Daghestanian language Sanzhi Dargwa) in contact with Russian. It also tests borrowing/code switching hierarchies that target parts of speech. Methodology The study applies the Matrix Language Frame model d...
Article
Full-text available
Agreement is among the most widely-researched issues in theoretical linguistics. In this introduction, we critically review some of the key issues, focussing on typological approaches to agreement, the role of agreement in establishing and maintaining reference, and the emergence of agreement diachronically. We point to the interplay of semantic, p...
Article
Person and gender are typical agreement features within the clause, and crosslinguistically they are frequently part of one and the same agreement system and even expressed through the same morphological exponents. Some theories even go so far as to claim that person and gender agreement on different targets, e.g., verbs and adjectives, are instanc...
Article
This chapter focuses on languages that mark evidentiality within the verbal complex. It provides an overview of the interrelations between evidentiality and other categories expressed on verbs. The categories investigated are tense, aspect, modality, polarity, person agreement, mood/speech act type, finiteness, Aktionsart/semantically defined verb...
Article
Every language has a way of saying how one knows what one is talking about, and what one thinks about what one knows. In some languages, one always has to specify the information source on which it is based—whether the speaker saw the event, or heard it, or inferred it based on something seen or on common sense, or was told about it by someone else...
Article
Hinuq and Bezhta, two languages of the Tsezic sub-group of the Nakh-Daghestanian (East Caucasian) language family, have General noun modifying clause constructions (GNMCCs), which have also been noted in some other Nakh-Daghestanian languages. While readily acceptable and interpretable, GNMCCs that do not receive an interpretation with a coreferent...
Article
Nakh-Daghestanian languages are known for their relatively elaborate gender systems and the impact the systems have on the grammar of the languages, most notably on verbal agreement. This paper explores the gender system of Hinuq with its five genders, taking into account semantic and formal principles for gender assignment and the rules of verbal...
Article
In linguistics, one of the central issues with regard to methodology is conceptualization. Since linguistic analysis consists to a great part of applying concepts to data, it is important to be conscious of what our concepts mean and how we define them. The aim of this paper is to reflect on concept formation in linguistics, with a special focus on...
Article
This paper investigates the morphosyntactic and pragmatic properties of floating person agreement in Sanzhi Dargwa (Nakh-Daghestanian, Russia). Person agreement enclitics can occur on the verb or on other constituents (NPs, adverbs, or pronouns). In the latter case, they seem to function like constituent focus markers because they emphasize their h...
Article
Full-text available
This study represents a typological investigation of additive markers that correspond to English . too, . also, and . as well. It is cross-linguistically common for additives to fulfill a wide range of functions including, among others, scalar additivity, the marking of concessive clauses, indefinite pronouns, association with contrastive topics, a...
Article
In this paper I examine the multifunctional enclitic =go in the Nakh-Daghestanian language Avar. By means of a semantic map I show that its central function is the expression of emphasis and/or contrast. Other uses are the expression of identity, scalar additivity, reflexivity (including local and longdistance reflexives, emphatic reflexive uses),...
Article
Full-text available
Proceedings of the 37th Annual Meeting of the Berkeley Linguistics Society: Special Session on Languages of the Caucasus (2013), pp. 32-51
Article
A generally accepted universal property of anaphors in reflexive and reciprocal constructions is that they cannot occur in the subject position of a main clause with a non-subject binder in the same clause. In this article a number of languages are examined that have reflexive elements resembling subjects. But it is argued that some of them can be...
Article
Full-text available
This paper provides an account of the argument/adjunct distinction implementing the ‘canonical approach’. I identify five criteria (obligatoriness, latency, co-occurrence restrictions, grammatical relations, and iterability) and seven diagnostic tendencies that can be used to distinguish canonical arguments from canonical adjuncts. I then apply the...
Article
This paper offers a comprehensive account of the verbal morphology in the Nakh-Daghestanian (or Northeast Caucasian) language Hinuq. As typical of the languages of that part of the world, Hinuq has a rich inventory of verbal inflectional suffixes, giving rise to verb forms with only verbal properties, and other verb forms lacking some verbal proper...
Article
Hinuq, a Nakh-Daghestanian language, has four non-canonical agent constructions: the potential, the involuntary agent, the exterior force and the causative construction. The non-canonical agents in these constructions lack various agentive properties such as volition, sentience or perception, depending on the construction in question. They are alwa...
Article
This paper analyzes the syntactic properties of adverbial clauses in the Tsezic languages, a group of five to six languages from the Nakh-Daghestanian language family (Caucasus, Russia). These languages make heavily use of converbs and other non-finite verb forms in order to form complex sentences. The syntactic analysis presented builds on Bickel’...
Article
Full-text available
This chapter deals with spatial relations in Hinuq and Bezhta, two Nakh-Daghestanian languages. The focus is on the expression of location by means of the rich spatial case systems of these languages.
Article
This contribution summarizes and illustrates the most important types of converbs found in the Tzesic languages and describes their semantic, morphological and syntactic properties. In particular, various types of “crossclausal dependencies” as described by Gast & Diessel (this volume) are investigated, e.g. restrictions on coreference and extracti...
Article
Full-text available
While all Nakh-Daghestanian languages show ergative-absolutive patterns of case assignment and gender/number agreement, many languages have sentences containing imperfective transitive predicates with both A and P in the absolutive case. In these bi-absolutive constructions, A is generally topicalized whereas P is pragmatically demoted. Bi-absoluti...
Article
This book reflects almost thirty years of research undertaken by Andrej Kibrik on reference in discourse, including numerous publications on anaphora, pronouns, deixis, and other topics in linguistics. It presents a comprehensive summary of this research, its current results, and innumerable suggestions for further investigations. Kibrik calls his...
Article
Full-text available
Hinuq (Nakh-Daghestanian language family, Caucasus, Russia) has a rich system of verbal forms. In independent/main clauses there are seven synthetic TAM forms, 20 periphrastic TAM forms, and two heterogeneous TAM forms that cannot be attributed clearly to one of these two groups. In dependent clauses there are about twenty forms that serve adverbia...
Article
The Tsezic languages form a sub-branch of the Nakh-Daghestanian language family. They nave up to eight location markers that can be combined with up to six orientation markers in order to form complex spatial categories. Outside the spatial domain these markers indicate temporal and in location and orientation. Their grammatical uses include among...
Article
The reconstruction of genealogical relationships between languages is traditionally performed through lexical comparison and the establishment of regular sound changes. The historical analysis of other aspects of linguistic structure, like syntactic patterns or the function of grammatical elements, is normally understood to depend on a previously e...

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Project (1)
Project
The research project Resilience in the South Caucasus: prospects and challenges of a new EU foreign policy concept (Jena-Cauc) is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). The project seeks to analyze the impacts of the “resilience turn” of EU foreign policy in the South Caucasus and its contribution to conflict and crisis prevention. Through an inside-out analysis it will focus on studying preferences of state and non-state stakeholders and the role of minority and language policy. Two separate clusters of the project will focus on the relationship between democracy and resilience in the South Caucasus and the place and role of the resilience approach within the wider regional strategy of the EU in the region. In doing so, the project will develop policy-relevant approaches which can contribute to effective implementation of EU’s regional governance in the South Caucasus region. The project combines area studies on the South Caucasus with the analysis of the German-European governance in the region. Further project goals are the structural strengthening of Caucasus Studies at the FSU Jena through the establishment of national and international cooperation in research and teaching, the communication of results to political and civil society actors, and the increase of the visibility of Caucasus Studies through transfer measures, international conferences, and the establishment of an international fellowship program.