Devin Lea Ward

Devin Lea Ward
University of Toronto | U of T · Department of Anthropology

PhD Evolutionary Anthropology
Locum Associate Editor at Nature Communications: Ecology, Evolution, and Genetics

About

20
Publications
5,832
Reads
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25
Citations
Introduction
My research interests include human skeletal biology, bioarchaeology, and the influence of general environmental stress on human variation. I explore the application of microCT scanning to study the bony labyrinth (inner ear). My research seeks to elucidate variation in the morphology and size of the bony labyrinth through the study of human populations spanning the transition to agriculture.
Additional affiliations
December 2015 - present
Midwestern University
Position
  • Research Assistant
October 2015 - December 2015
The Gibraltar National Museum
The Gibraltar National Museum
Position
  • Research Assistant
May 2015 - present
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Position
  • Finds Assistant
Education
October 2014 - October 2015
University of Cambridge
Field of study
  • Biological Anthropological Science
August 2011 - May 2014
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Field of study
  • Evolutionary Anthropology (mins. Italian, Cultural Heritage and Preservation Studies)

Publications

Publications (20)
Article
Postmenopausal osteoporosis is a serious concern in aging individuals, but has not been explored for its potential to alter the shape of the inner ear by way of increased remodelling in the otic capsule. The otic capsule, or bony labyrinth, is thought to experience uniquely limited remodelling after development due to high levels of osteoprotegerin...
Article
Objectives Intraspecific shape variation in the recent Homo sapiens bony labyrinth has been assessed for association with sexual dimorphism, body size, and genetic differences, but has not been fully assessed for association with extrinsic factors, such as subsistence strategy and climate. While the skull overall is known to vary with these variabl...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: This study aims to investigate parasitic infection in Italy during the Roman period (27 BCE–476 CE) and subsequent Longobard (Lombard) period (6th–8th CE). Materials: Sediment samples from drains and burials from Roman Imperial-period sites in Italy (Lucus Feroniae, Oplontis, Vacone, and Vagnari), Late Antique and Longobard-period burial...
Article
Full-text available
Maternal malnutrition during gestation and lactation is known to have adverse effects on offspring. We evaluate the impact of maternal diet on offspring bony labyrinth morphology. The bony labyrinth develops early and is thought to be stable to protect vital sensory organs within. For these reasons, bony labyrinth morphology has been used extensive...
Article
Full-text available
Osipov and colleagues [American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 2(151) 2013] previously posited that the dimensions of the bony labyrinth exhibit sexual dimorphism. Using a recent sample of known sex, they produced an age-independent, multivariate equation to predict biological sex using several of these dimensions. We aim to test the applicabili...
Article
In 2014, during construction work at the ex-Civil Hospital in Gibraltar, excavations led by the Gibraltar Museum revealed a major, previously unknown burial ground containing more than 200 skeletons. We present the historical, archaeological and radiometric dating evidence from the site alongside the results of initial osteological analyses. The da...
Article
The systemic robusticity hypothesis links the thickness of cortical bone in both the cranium and limb bones. This hypothesis posits that thick cortical bone is in part a systemic response to circulating hormones, such as growth hormone and thyroid hormone, possibly related to physical activity or cold climates. Although this hypothesis has gained p...
Research
Full-text available
Ist issue of the IJSRA (International Journal of Student Research in Archaeology). Includes original research papers, book reviews, conference reviews and interviews. Author list here reflects editorial board and article authors. Contents: Gonzalo Linares Matás - A student perspective on the present of archaeology: IJSRA editorial Gonzalo Linar...
Research
Full-text available
3rd issue of the IJSRA (International Journal of Student Research in Archaeology). Includes original research papers, book reviews, conference reviews and interviews. Author list here reflects editorial board and article authors. Contents: Gonzalo Linares Matás: Presentation of the third issue of IJSRA Interview Cherene de Bruyn, Jacqueline J...
Research
Full-text available
2nd issue of the IJSRA (International Journal of Student Research in Archaeology). Includes original research papers, book and literature reviews, conference reviews and interviews. Author list here reflects editorial board and article authors. Contents: Gonzalo Linares Matás - Presentation of the Second Issue of IJSRA Interview Hannah F. Ryan...
Poster
Full-text available
Excavations in 2014 at the old St. Bernard’s Hospital site, Gibraltar, revealed a previously unknown cemetery containing over 200 single and multiple burials. A hospital was founded at this site in 1567 to treat sailors, before a British military take over in 1704 and the building’s conversion into barracks by 1754. It was reconverted into a civili...
Poster
Full-text available
Post-occupation burials in Roman villas are common in central Italy. The style and location of these burials evolve considerably from Late Imperial Rome through the Medieval period. In the first two centuries C.E., tombs were often constructed close to and sometimes even attached to habitation quarters. But following the abandonment of many villas...
Poster
Full-text available
Post-occupation burials in Roman villas are common in central Italy. The style and location of these burials evolve considerably from Late Imperial Rome through the Medieval period. In the first two centuries C.E., tombs were often constructed close to and sometimes even attached to habitation quarters. But following the abandonment of many villas...
Presentation
Full-text available
The Homo sapiens bony labyrinth (inner ear), cranial base, vault, and face develop in approximate succession and retain relative morphological and developmental independence despite integration. We hypothesize that levels of fluctuating asymmetry (FA) in these regions will correlate positively with the time it takes a region to reach adult morpholo...
Presentation
Full-text available
Adult body size reflects both genotype and environmental conditions during development. Using body size as a marker of developmental stress exposure in past populations may therefore be confounded by genetic differences. The auditory bony labyrinth completes growth by the 19th fetal week, so may reflect genetic growth potential. Previous studies sh...
Research
Full-text available
Abstract of undergraduate thesis submitted for highest honors in Evolutionary Anthropology (BSc) in the Department of Anthropology at Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA.
Article
Full-text available
Museum archaeological collections provide an excellent opportunity to test hypotheses on previously excavated material. However, many archaeological collections are decades old and can remain in museum storage for significant periods of time. This project is a case study of the faunal assemblage from the Pennella archaeological site (28-Oc-60) in O...
Conference Paper
As standardized archaeological practices become more common in the Mediterranean Region, post-Classical finds formerly considered unimportant, such as human remains, are receiving increasing attention. These non-structural finds reveal themselves to be very informative of cultural and demographic changes in this area after the fall of the Roman Emp...
Conference Paper
Results of a new study of the faunal remains excavated at the Pennella archaeological site (28.Oc.60) in Ocean County, New Jersey (1972 - 1975) will be presented. The material was initially reviewed after its accession to the New Jersey State Museum Bureau of Archaeology and Ethnology in 1980, and it has since remained in storage without further an...
Article
Full-text available
Faunal remains from the 1972 and 1974/5 excavations at the Pennella archaeological site in Ocean County, New Jersey, were studied for the purposes of (1) determining the paleoecology of the area and (2) analyzing Native American land usage practices. This analysis was used as a case study relevant to aging collections in museum storage at the New J...

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