Devi Taelman

Devi Taelman
Vrije Universiteit Brussel | VUB · Department of History

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About

33
Publications
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197
Citations
Additional affiliations
October 2013 - present
Ghent University
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (33)
Data
The Archaeology and Geology Departments of Ghent University are proud to announce the launch of the online open-access reference collection FLEPOSTORE: Flemish Pottery & Stone Reference collection. It can be consulted online at: https://flepostore.ugent.be The reference collection focuses on pottery and stone found at archaeological sites and in hi...
Article
Samples from twenty‐two white crystalline and one greco scritto‐like marble artefacts (1st–3rd century CE) from Roman Sentinum (Sassoferato, Italy) were analysed for determining their provenance by thin section microscopy, X‐ray diffraction and stable isotope ratio analysis (δ18O and δ13C). Polychrome marbles were provenanced through macroscopic ex...
Book
Full-text available
Compared to other pre-modern economies, the Roman world stands out for having developed a highly specialised and very productive manufacturing sector. This development led to the widespread and large-scale extraction of raw materials. Even in a territory as large as the Roman Empire, such activities put major pressure on the land. Strategies of res...
Chapter
This contribution presents the results of an archaeological and archaeometric study of the provenance and use of marble in Roman central Adriatic Italy. During the Late Republic and Early Empire, the area was one of the most urbanised regions in the Roman world. Most towns were extensively equipped with monumental buildings, often lavishly decorate...
Article
Full reference: Verhoeven, G., Vermeulen, F., Taelman, D. and Verdonck, L. (2019), “Taking vegetation marks into the next dimension. Mapping the hilltop settlement of Montarice (central Adriatic Italy) by a multi-dimensional analysis of aerial imagery”, Archeologia Aerea 11 , pp. 79–84. --- The processing of aerial imagery acquired over Montarice...
Article
This paper presents the results of the characterisation, provenance determination, quantification (by count and weight) and contextualisation of the white and coloured marbles used for decorating the Roman theatre of Urbino (Marche region, Italy). The main goals of the paper are to contribute to a better understanding of the trade and use of marble...
Article
Ammaia is a deserted Roman town located in the region of Alto Alentejo, in Portugal, included in the ancient province of Lusitania. In recent years, a series of non-destructive archaeological diagnostics have been carried out in the framework of the European Union (EU) funded project Radio-Past, in the supposed intra-mural area of the ancient town...
Book
Full-text available
This first volume in a new series about Belgian archaeological research in Italy brings all relevant data together about the newly discovered and systematically surveyed sites in the Potenza Valley Survey project (2000-2017). The well-illustrated book presents the wide array of new archaeological finds and topographic and chronological data about s...
Article
This paper presents the results of a multi-disciplinary provenance study of Roman stone ointment palettes (1st–4th century AD) found in the northern part of the provinces of Gallia Belgica and Germania Inferior. Comparative analysis allowed a geo-archaeological team to identify the raw materials used for carving the palettes. Geological origins as...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, the impact of spatial sample density and three-dimensional migration processing on the interpretation of archaeological ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data is assessed. First, the question of how to determine the sample interval required to take full advantage of the spatial resolution capabilities of GPR without oversampling is addr...
Article
Full-text available
This paper reports the results of a quantitative and qualitative study of the imported architectural decorative stone of the Roman town of Ammaia (São Salvador da Aramenha, Portugal), located centrally in the province of Lusitania. All studied ornamental stones were counted, weighed, classified and their provenance was determined. Six types of ston...
Article
A multimethod approach using petrography and strontium (Sr) isotopic analysis was applied to determine the geological source of 17 marble artefacts from the Roman town of Ammaia (Portugal). All samples are calcitic, with dolomite, quartz and muscovite as accessory minerals. The marbles are characteristically medium-grained with a maximum grain size...
Article
Ancient quarries are intriguing archaeological sites, but their detailed recording is complex. This paper presents a cost-effective approach to mapping of the Roman quarry site of Pitaranha (Portugal–Spain). First, aerial photographs were acquired using a radio-controlled digital reflex camera attached to a Helikite, which allowed the acquisition o...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter describes the ground-penetrating radar surveys conducted between 2008 and 2011 at the Roman town Ammaia (Portugal). The methodology (data acquisition and processing), the results and the archaeological interpretation are discussed.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
De acordo com as evidências históricas e arqueológicas, a Cidade Romana de Ammaia (Marvão, Portugal) terá sido fundada no século I d.C., atingindo o seu auge nos séculos I-II d.C., como importante centro urbano da Lusitânia [1]. Progressivamente, terá sido abandonada até ao século IX, não sendo conhecida até ao momento ocupação posterior. Nos 15 an...
Presentation
Full-text available
Informações: CIA-IX@itn.pt-http://www.cia-ix.itn.pt As argamassas da cidade romana de Ammaia – um estudo interdisciplinar I. RESUMO De acordo com as evidências históricas e arqueológicas, a Cidade Romana de Ammaia (Marvão, Portugal) terá sido fundada no século I d.C., atingindo o seu auge nos séculos I-II d.C., como importante centro urbano da Lusi...
Article
This paper presents the results of a geoarchaeological research project in the north-eastern Alentejo region of Portugal. The study focuses on the granite and rock crystal exploitation in the territory of the Roman town of Ammaia. By means of non-destructive survey methods, performed by an interdisciplinary team of archaeologists, geomorphologists...

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Projects (2)
Project
The Flemish Pottery and Stone Reference collection (FLEPOSTORE) offers an online open access platform and a physical hands-on collection of locally produced as well as imported pottery and ceramic building material from archaeological contexts and local and imported worked stone from prehistoric till pre-industrial times (ca. 5000BC-1700AD). The focus of the collection is on diagnostic reference geo-materials: clay and rock sourced from natural outcrops or quarries and ceramics from pottery production sites (e.g. kilns, waste contexts) in Flanders but also in neighbouring areas. The intended users are archaeologists, geologists, heritage professionals, students and the wider audience with interest in the topic of the database. Flepostore is a continuous work in progress and doesn't offer an exhaustive overview. The Flepostore project is the result of a collaboration between the Departments of Archaeology and Geology from Ghent University and is funded by a Hercules Grant from the Flanders Research Foundation (FWO).
Project
During the recent two decades archaeological research on ancient urbanism has left the traditional path of excavations, documentation of earlier field activities, and topographical analysis of surface relics and indications of urban continuity. Field archaeology has begun to reveal the advantages of intensively integrating a range of different non-destructive techniques on urban sites, choosing those suites that are most appropriate for the nature of the town in question. The variety of techniques can be quite impressive, such as the application of different geophysical instruments (for georadar, magnetometer or earth resistance survey, etc.), different aerial photography approaches (such as flying with traditional airplanes, drones or balloons or using multispectral techniques of photography), geomorphological and geomatic approaches (coring, erosion modelling, DTM production …), etc. Therefore, the concept of integrated, non-invasive multi-method survey relates to a much wider range of techniques, and the overall methodology envisages a reasoned deployment of them all, or of a choice of them for systematic data acquisition at the site studied, by testing, sampling or total coverage. The current project of the UGent team aims at contributing to the study of urbanism in Roman Italy by these innovating approaches to the archaeological record, while at the same time taking part in the innovation of methods. After successful applications of such Roman town research in other parts of the western Mediterranean (Lusitania, Corsica) most research is now concentrated on fully or partly abandoned Roman town contexts in Italy. In central Adriatic Italy four towns located in the Potenza valley are being investigated with whole suites of these prospection techniques. They are the coastal colony of Potentia and the inland municipia of Ricina, Trea and Septempeda. Since 2015 full coverage georadar survey work has also started on two towns in Latium (Interamna Lirenas and Falerii Novi) in collaboration with the University of Cambridge (Department of Classics). The contribution of all these integrated surveys, sometimes accompanied by focused small excavation work, allow the detailed and extensive high resolution mapping of the Roman towns and help to enlarge the dataset of ancient towns in Italy with a view on answering crucial historical questions related to town formation and disintegration, the regional character of urbanism, Roman population numbers, town-countryside connections, etc.