Desika Moodley

Desika Moodley
The Czech Academy of Sciences | AVCR · Institute of Botany

PhD

About

23
Publications
10,211
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367
Citations
Citations since 2016
18 Research Items
329 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120

Publications

Publications (23)
Preprint
Full-text available
Globalization challenges sustainability by intensifying the ecological and economic impacts of biological invasions. These impacts may be unevenly distributed worldwide, with costs disproportionately incurred by a few regions. Here, we identify how invasion economic costs are distributed among origin and recipient regions at country and continent l...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction pathways play a pivotal role in the success of Invasive Alien Species (IAS)—the subset of alien species that have a negative environmental and/or socio-economic impact. Pathways refer to the fundamental processes that leads to the introduction of a species from one geographical location to another—marking the beginning of all alien spe...
Article
Full-text available
Biological invasions are one of the top drivers of the ongoing biodiversity crisis. An underestimated consequence of invasions is the enormity of their economic impacts. Knowledge gaps regarding economic costs produced by invasive alien species (IAS) are pervasive, particularly for emerging economies such as India—the fastest growing economy worldw...
Article
Full-text available
Biological invasions are one of the main threats to biodiversity within protected areas (PAs) worldwide. Meanwhile, the resilience of PAs to invasions remains largely unknown. Consequently, providing a better understanding of how they are impacted by invasions is critical for informing policy responses and optimally allocating resources to preventi...
Article
Invasive alien species (IAS) are a growing global ecological problem. Reports on the socioeconomic impacts of biological invasions are accumulating, but our understanding of temporal trends across regions and taxa remains scarce. Accordingly, we investigated temporal trends in the economic cost of IAS and cost-reporting literature using the InvaCos...
Article
Full-text available
Biological invasions can dramatically impact natural ecosystems and human societies. However, although knowledge of the economic impacts of biological invasions provides crucial insights for efficient management and policy, reliable syntheses are still lacking. This is particularly true for low income countries where economic resources are insuffic...
Preprint
Full-text available
Introduction pathways play a pivotal role in the success of Invasive Alien Species (IAS) – the subset of alien species that have a negative environmental and/or socio-economic impact. Pathways refer to the fundamental mechanism that leads to the introduction of a species outside of its native range – marking the beginning of all alien species invas...
Preprint
Full-text available
Biological invasions are one of the top drivers of the ongoing biodiversity crisis. An underestimated consequence of invasions is the enormity of their economic impacts. Knowledge gaps regarding economic costs produced by invasive alien species (IAS) are pervasive, particularly for emerging economies such as India — the fastest growing economy worl...
Preprint
Full-text available
Biological invasions are one of the main threats to biodiversity within protected areas (PAs) worldwide. Meanwhile, the resilience of PAs along with their capacity to mitigate impacts from invasions remains largely unknown. Filling this knowledge gap is therefore critical for informing policy responses and optimally allocating resources invested in...
Article
Full-text available
A recent global assessment of terrestrial alien true ferns (Polypodiophyta; hereafter alien ferns) showed that alien ferns have a high probability of becoming naturalised or invasive once introduced. We provide the first systematic assessment, based on field surveys, of the invasion status of this large taxon in South Africa. Thirteen species of al...
Article
Full-text available
Our ability to predict invasions has been hindered by the seemingly idiosyncratic context-dependency of individual invasions. However, we argue that robust and useful generalisations in invasion science can be made by considering “invasion syndromes” which we define as “a combination of pathways, alien species traits, and characteristics of the rec...
Article
Full-text available
Establishing and managing protected areas (national parks, nature reserves and other sites of conservation value) represent the most common approach to conserving species and ecosystems, but these areas are vulnerable to global environmental change. Recently, Golden Kroner et al. (2019) suggested protected area downgrading, downsizing, and degazett...
Article
Full-text available
Why some lineages are species‐rich and widespread, while others are species‐poor and localized, is a fundamental question in evolutionary biology and ecology. Diversification and range expansion relate to lineage‐specific niche characters, but this link has seldom been quantified across multiple lineages and environments. This study explored the li...
Article
Full-text available
The global threat posed by invasive alien plants has prompted inventory compilations and screening exercises that aim to understand invasiveness in various taxa. Various traits influence the invasiveness of a species but do not apply to all plant taxa. Ferns are rare or absent from such inventories, but notable fern invasions do exist. We developed...
Article
Full-text available
The predictive success of risk assessments is still largely a function of invasiveness elsewhere. Therefore, species that are invasive elsewhere should be prioritised for management, and where possible eradicated. We set out to investigate the threat posed by the alien climber Epipremnum aureum (Araceae) and assess techniques for controlling the sp...
Article
Full-text available
Significant progress has been made in understanding biological invasions recently and one of the key findings is that the determinants of naturalization and invasion success vary from group to group. Here we explore this variation for one of the largest plant families in the world, the Araceae. This group provides an excellent opportunity for ident...
Article
Full-text available
Reproduction is a crucial stage in the naturalization of introduced plant species. Here, using breeding system experiments and observations of floral visitors, we investigate whether a lack of pollinators or an inability to autonomously self-fertilize limits naturalization in five Australian Banksia species and the co-familial Hakea salicifolia in...
Article
The outcome of plant introductions is often considered in binary terms (invasive or non-invasive). However, most species experience a time lag before naturalization occurs, and many species become naturalized at some sites but not at others. It is therefore important to understand the site-specific mechanisms underlying naturalization. Proteaceae i...
Article
Full-text available
The transition from a species introduction to an invasion often spans many decades (a lag phase). However, few studies have determined the mechanisms underlying lag phases. Such a mechanistic understanding is vital if the potential ecosystem-level impacts are to be predicted and the invasion risks to be managed proactively. Here we examine Banksia...
Article
Full-text available
A major aim of invasion ecology is to identify characteristics of successful invaders. However, most plant groups studied in detail (e.g. pines and acacias) have a high percentage of invasive taxa. Here we examine the global introduction history and invasion ecology of Proteaceae—a large plant family with many taxa that have been widely disseminate...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Assessing the economic costs of biological invasions, for all taxa, all regions, all activity sectors, all types of economic costs, and much more!
Project
To document patterns in the distribution and co-occurrence of alien invasive plant and animal species in the province of KwaZulu-Natal, and in particular in woody vegetation within the city of Durban (eThekwini Municipality).