Dennis Höning

Dennis Höning
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research | PIK · Earth System Analysis - Research Domain I

PhD

About

49
Publications
3,786
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
328
Citations

Publications

Publications (49)
Article
The origin and evolution of life has undoubtedly had a major impact on the evolution of Earth's oceans and atmosphere. Recent studies have suggested that bioactivity may have had an even deeper impact and may have caused a change in the redox-state of the mantle and provided a path for the formation of continents. We here present a numerical model...
Article
Is the present-day water-land ratio a necessary outcome of the evolution of plate tectonic planets with a similar age, volume, mass, and total water inventory as the Earth? This would be the case - largely independent of initial conditions - if Earth's present-day continental volume were at a stable unique equilibrium with strong self-regulating me...
Article
Aims. The long-term carbon cycle for planets with a surface entirely covered by oceans works differently from that of the present-day Earth because inefficient erosion leads to a strong dependence of the weathering rate on the rate of volcanism. In this paper, we investigate the long-term carbon cycle for these planets throughout their evolution. M...
Article
Full-text available
Surface life has been argued to be crucial in keeping a planet habitable in the long term. Biologically enhanced weathering compensates for increasing solar luminosity, and temperature‐dependent plant productivity weakens climate perturbations. Furthermore, a reduced calcification rate of marine organisms provides a negative feedback to rising atmo...
Preprint
Full-text available
Little is known about the early evolution of Venus and a potential habitable period during the first one billion years. In particular, it remains unclear whether or not plate tectonics and an active carbonate-silicate cycle were present. In the presence of liquid water but without plate tectonics, weathering would have been limited to freshly produ...
Preprint
Full-text available
In this chapter, we focus on the long-term evolution of the atmosphere of Venus, and how it has been affected by interior/exterior cycles. The formation and evolution of Venus's atmosphere, leading to the present-day surface conditions, remain hotly debated and involve questions that tie into many disciplines. Here, we explore the mechanisms that s...
Article
In this chapter, we focus on the long-term evolution of the atmosphere of Venus, and how it has been affected by interior/exterior cycles. The formation and evolution of Venus's atmosphere, leading to the present-day surface conditions, remain hotly debated and involve questions that tie into many disciplines. Here, we explore the mechanisms that s...
Preprint
The presence of rocky exoplanets with a large refractory carbon inventory is predicted by chemical evolution models of protoplanetary disks of stars with photospheric C/O >0.65, and by models studying the radial transport of refractory carbon. High-pressure high-temperature laboratory experiments show that most of the carbon in these exoplanets dif...
Preprint
Full-text available
As the number of detected rocky extrasolar planets increases, the question of whether their surfaces could be habitable is becoming more pertinent. On Earth, the long-term carbonate silicate cycle is able to regulate surface temperatures over timescales larger than one million years. Elevated temperatures enhance weathering, removing CO$_2$ from th...
Article
Full-text available
Little is known about the early evolution of Venus and a potential habitable period during the first 1 billion years. In particular, it remains unclear whether or not plate tectonics and an active carbonate-silicate cycle were present. In the presence of liquid water but without plate tectonics, weathering would have been limited to freshly produce...
Preprint
Full-text available
Context: The long-term carbonate-silicate cycle plays an important role in the evolution of Earth's climate and, therefore, may also be an important mechanism in the evolution of the climates of Earth-like exoplanets. Aims: We investigate the effects of radiogenic mantle heating, core size, and planetary mass on the evolution of the atmospheric par...
Article
Context. The long-term carbonate silicate cycle plays an important role in the evolution of Earth’s climate and, therefore, may also be an important mechanism in the evolution of the climates of Earth-like exoplanets. However, given the large diversity in the possible interiors for Earth-like exoplanets, the ensuing evolution of the atmospheric CO...
Article
Context. The presence of rocky exoplanets with a large refractory carbon inventory is predicted by chemical evolution models of protoplanetary disks of stars with photospheric C/O > 0.65, and by models studying the radial transport of refractory carbon. High-pressure high-temperature laboratory experiments show that most of the carbon in these exop...
Preprint
The presence of rocky exoplanets with a large refractory carbon inventory is predicted by chemical evolution models of protoplanetary disks of stars with photospheric C/O >0.65, and by models studying the radial transport of refractory organic carbon. High-pressure high-temperature laboratory experiments show that most of the carbon in these exopla...
Preprint
Full-text available
This paper reviews habitability conditions for a terrestrial planet from the point of view of geosciences. It addresses how interactions between the interior of a planet or a moon and its atmosphere and surface (including hydrosphere and biosphere) can affect habitability of the celestial body. It does not consider in detail the role of the central...
Article
Full-text available
This paper reviews habitability conditions for a terrestrial planet from the point of view of geosciences. It addresses how interactions between the interior of a planet or a moon and its atmosphere and surface (including hydrosphere and biosphere) can affect habitability of the celestial body. It does not consider in detail the role of the central...
Preprint
Aims: The long-term carbon cycle for planets with a surface entirely covered by oceans works differently from that of the present-day Earth because inefficient erosion leads to a strong dependence of the weathering rate on the rate of volcanism. In this paper, we investigate the long-term carbon cycle for these planets throughout their evolution. M...
Article
Satellite and recent Earth-based observations of Io's surface reveal a specific spatial pattern of persisting hotspots and sudden high-intensity events. Io's major heat producing mechanism is tidal dissipation, which is thought to be non-uniformly distributed within Io's mantle and asthenosphere. The question arises to what extent Io's non-homogene...
Article
Plate tectonics is a fundamental component for the habitability of the Earth. Yet whether it is a recurrent feature of terrestrial bodies orbiting other stars or unique to the Earth is unknown. The stagnant lid may rather be the most common tectonic expression on such bodies. To understand whether a stagnant-lid planet can be habitable, i.e. host l...
Article
Full-text available
The Interuniversity Attraction Pole (IAP) ‘PLANET TOPERS’ (Planets: Tracing the Transfer, Origin, Preservation, and Evolution of their Reservoirs) addresses the fundamental understanding of the thermal and compositional evolution of the different reservoirs of planetary bodies (core, mantle, crust, atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, and space) co...
Article
Water is necessary for the origin and survival of life as we know it. In the search for life-friendly worlds, water-rich planets therefore are obvious candidates and have attracted increasing attention in recent years. The surface H2O layer on such planets (containing a liquid water ocean and possibly high-pressure ice below a specific depth) could...
Article
A model of Earth’s continental coverage and mantle water budget is discussed along with its thermal evolution. The model links a thermal evolution model based on parameterized mantle convection with a model of a generic subduction zone that includes the oceanic crust and a sedimentary layer as carriers of water. Part of the subducted water is used...
Presentation
European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2016
Conference Paper
Subduction is an important process on Earth. Through the subducting slab the oceanic lithosphere, including volatiles and sediments, is recycled back into the mantle. While metamorphic processes in great depth are the subject of many studies, the dewatering of the subducting oceanic crust in very shallow depth is often neglected. We show that a low...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Several space missions (CoRoT, Kepler and others) already provided promising candidates for terrestrial exoplanets (i.e. with masses less than about 10 Earth masses) and thereby triggered an exciting new research branch of planetary modelling to investigate the possible habitability of such planets. Earth analogues (low-mass planets with an Earth-l...
Conference Paper
As the number of discovered exoplanets is increasing, the question whether these planets could harbor life becomes more relevant. Chemoautotrophs, which live from thermal disequilibrium due to volcanic activity, are believed to have been the first organisms on Earth and maybe on planets in general. Furthermore, volcanism influences the atmosphere,...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The habitability of planets has received increasing interest, in particular in view of the increasing number of detected extrasolar planets. Planetary habitability (for life as we know it) is thought to require water on (or near) the surface, a magnetic field to protect life against radiation, and transport mechanisms for nutrients. A chemoautotrop...

Network

Cited By