Denise Pope

Denise Pope
University of Massachusetts Amherst | UMass Amherst · Graduate School

PhD

About

9
Publications
1,999
Reads
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202
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2019 - May 2020
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Position
  • CIRTL@UMass Coordinator
January 2017 - April 2020
Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching and Learning (CIRTL)
Position
  • Teaching-as-Research Program Coordinator
January 2016 - January 2016
Bard College
Position
  • Citizen Science Faculty
Education
August 1991 - November 1998
Duke University
Field of study
  • Zoology
August 1985 - May 1989
St. John's College
Field of study
  • Liberal arts

Publications

Publications (9)
Article
There is a broad movement in science classes to emphasize higher-order thinking and complex skills over simple accumulation of facts. A major barrier to making this shift is a lack of good assessment tools for evaluating higher-order thinking that can be used with low effort by instructors. Computerized assessments aid instructors and increase effi...
Article
Full-text available
Background This research builds on a previous study that looked at the effectiveness of a simulation-based module for teaching students about the process of evolution by natural selection. While the previous study showed that the module was successful in teaching how natural selection works, the research uncovered some weaknesses in the design. In...
Article
Full-text available
Background Simulations can be an active and engaging way for students to learn about natural selection, and many have been developed, including both physical and virtual simulations. In this study we assessed the student experience of, and learning from, two natural selection simulations, one physical and one virtual, in a large enrollment introduc...
Article
Full-text available
Background Evolution is a difficult subject for students, with well-documented confusion about natural selection, tree thinking, and genetic drift among other topics. Here we investigate the effect of a simulation-based module about the conservation of black-footed ferrets, a module designed with pedagogical approaches that have been demonstrated t...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods The experimental process for testing hypotheses is the backbone of all fields of science, but is something many students struggle with. All the new science standards and frameworks (NGSS, Vision and Change, etc.) strongly encourage active classrooms that help students understand and learn to do good experiments. Yet in...
Article
Competition between species can include signal competition in addition to competition for space and resources. Fiddler crabs (Uca spp.) are an excellent system for examining visual signal competition given their use of visual displays and burrow structures such as sand hoods. Where fiddler crab species overlap in habitat, females may face challenge...
Article
Introduction, A communication network is formed when more than one receiver can intercept the signal produced by a signaller, and when more than one signal reaches a receiver at the same time (McGregor & Dabelsteen, 1996). Communication network theory broadens the consideration of selection pressures on signallers and receivers to include selection...
Article
Like many territory advertisement signals, the claw waving display of fiddler crabs (genus Uca) is commonly thought to have the dual function of simultaneously repelling males and attracting females. I have found, however, that male sand fiddler crabs (U. pugilator) wave significantly more in the presence of females than males, suggesting that thei...
Article
Full-text available
Many territorial advertisement signals are thought to be dual-function signals, directed to both rival male and receptive female conspecifics. However, few studies have tested this assumption by examining whether in fact both sexes are likely to elicit signaling behavior from territorial males. In this study, I experimentally manipulated the social...

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