Denise Henriques

Denise Henriques
York University · School of Kinesiology and Health Sciences

About

136
Publications
12,692
Reads
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2,950
Citations
Citations since 2016
34 Research Items
1457 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
Introduction
Denise Henriques currently works at the School of Kinesiology and Health Sciences, York University. Denise does research in Neuropsychology and Behavioural Science. Their most recent publication is 'The fast contribution of visual-proprioceptive discrepancy to reach aftereffects and proprioceptive recalibration'.

Publications

Publications (136)
Article
Introducing altered visual feedback of the hand produces quick adaptation of reaching movements. Our lab has shown that the associated shifts in estimates of the felt position of the hand saturate within a few training trials. The current study investigates whether the rapid changes in felt hand position that occur during classic visuomotor adaptat...
Poster
Full-text available
In response to unexpected perturbations during a motor task, we modify subsequent movements to compensate for errors and improve performance. Motor adaptation to a visuomotor rotation is characterized by reduced errors over time and aftereffects (errors in the opposite direction) following removal of the perturbation. In dual adaptation, participan...
Preprint
Human motor adaptation relies on both explicit conscious strategies and implicit unconscious updating of internal models to correct motor errors. Implicit adaptation is powerful, requiring less preparation time before executing adapted movements, but recent work suggests it is limited to some absolute magnitude regardless of the size of a visuomoto...
Preprint
Both implicit (unconscious, automatic) and explicit (effortful, strategic) processes contribute to various kinds of learning ¹ , including visuomotor adaptation 2–4 . Implicit adaptation may be capped at some level ⁵ , regardless of the level of explicit adaptation, or implicit and explicit adaptation could be linearly added in total adaptation 6,7...
Poster
Full-text available
The human motor system can adapt to unexpected perturbations during ongoing movements. Except for target jump studies, most of the research focused on adaptation to perturbations applied to the hand, such as force field or visuomotor rotation. But less is known about how we adapt to perturbations affecting objects that we interact with. For instanc...
Article
Full-text available
Sensorimotor learning is supported by at least two parallel systems: a strategic process that benefits from explicit knowledge, and an implicit process that adapts subconsciously. How do these systems interact? Does one system's contributions suppress the other, or do they operate independently? Here we illustrate that during reaching, implicit and...
Article
Full-text available
If a Gabor pattern drifts in one direction while its internal texture drifts in the orthogonal direction, its perceived position deviates further and further away from its true path. We first evaluated the illusion using manual tracking. Participants followed the Gabor with a stylus on a drawing tablet that coincided optically with the horizontal m...
Preprint
Full-text available
Motor adaptation describes the ability of the motor system to counteract repeated perturbations in order to reduce movement errors. Most research in the field investigated adaptation in response to perturbations affecting the moving hand. Fewer studies looked at the effect of a perturbation applied to the movement target, however they used simplist...
Preprint
Full-text available
Introducing altered visual feedback of the hand results in quick adaptation of reaching movements. And while this may be partly due to explicit strategies, our lab has shown that implicit changes like reach aftereffects and shift in estimates of the unseen hand, can also emerge and even saturate within a few training trials. The goal of the current...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose To explore the effect of joint hypermobility on acuity, and precision, of hand proprioception. Materials and methods We compared proprioceptive acuity, and precision, between EDS patients and controls. We then measured any changes in their estimates of hand position after participants adapted their reaches in response to altered visual fee...
Article
Full-text available
The ability to switch between different visuomotor maps accurately and efficiently is an invaluable feature to a flexible and adaptive human motor system. This can be examined in dual adaptation paradigms where the motor system is challenged to perform under randomly switching, opposing perturbations. Typically, dual adaptation doesn’t proceed unle...
Article
Full-text available
Individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and healthy adults demonstrate similar levels of visuomotor adaptation provided that the distortion is small or introduced gradually, and hence, implicit processes are engaged. Recently, implicit processes underlying visuomotor adaptation in healthy individuals have been proposed to include proprioceptive r...
Article
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An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
Preprint
Full-text available
Purpose To explore the effect of joint hypermobility on acuity, and plasticity, of hand proprioception. Materials and Methods We compared proprioceptive acuity between EDS patients and controls. We then measured any changes in their estimate of hand position after participants adapted their reaches in response to altered visual feedback of their h...
Article
Full-text available
Trial-to-trial variability during visuomotor adaptation is usually explained as the result of two different sources, planning noise and execution noise. The estimation of the underlying variance parameters from observations involving varying feedback conditions cannot be achieved by standard techniques (Kalman filter) because they do not account fo...
Article
Full-text available
In motor learning, the slow development of implicit learning is traditionally taken for granted. While much is known about training performance during adaptation to a perturbation in reaches, saccades and locomotion, little is known about the time course of the underlying implicit processes during normal motor adaptation. Implicit learning is chara...
Article
Full-text available
In learning and adapting movements in changing conditions, people attribute the errors they experience to a combined weighting of internal or external sources. As such, error attribution that places more weight on external sources should lead to decreased updates in our internal models for movement of the limb or estimating the position of the effe...
Article
Full-text available
Knowing where our limbs are in space is essential for moving and for adapting movements to various changes in our environments and bodies. The ability to adapt movements declines with age, and age-related cognitive decline can explain a decreased ability to adopt and deploy explicit, cognitive strategies in motor learning. Age-related sensory decli...
Preprint
Full-text available
In motor learning, the slow development of implicit learning, following explicit components of learning is well established. While much is known about behaviour during adaptation to a perturbation in reaches, saccades and locomotion, little is known about implicit processes during adaptation. Implicit learning is characterized by both changes in in...
Preprint
Full-text available
Motor learning and adaptation are guided by the attribution of errors to internal or external sources. When errors are clearly external, we should not update our internal models for movement or state estimation, i.e. there should be no implicit learning. However, measures of implicit learning are the same whether or not we induce explicit adaptatio...
Article
Full-text available
An accurate estimate of limb position is necessary for movement planning, before and after motor learning. Where we localize our unseen hand after a reach depends on felt hand position, or proprioception, but in studies and theories on motor adaptation this is quite often neglected in favour of predicted sensory consequences based on efference copi...
Article
Full-text available
Awareness of task demands is often used during rehabilitation and sports training by providing instructions which appears to accelerate learning and improve performance through explicit motor learning. However, the effects of awareness of perturbations on the changes in estimates of hand position resulting from motor learning are not well understoo...
Preprint
In this project we test if age has an effect on hand localization and if this can be altered by explicit instructions.
Preprint
Full-text available
An accurate estimate of limb position is necessary for movement. Where we localize our unseen hand after a reach depends on felt hand position, or proprioception, but often only predicted sensory consequences based on efference copies of motor commands are considered. Both signals should contribute, so here we use passive training with rotated visu...
Preprint
Awareness of task demands is often used during rehabilitation and sports training by providing instructions which appears to accelerate learning and improve performance through explicit motor learning. However, the effects of awareness of perturbations on the changes in estimates of hand position resulting from motor learning are not well understoo...
Preprint
Full-text available
Explicit awareness of a task is often evoked during rehabilitation and sports training with the intention of accelerating learning and improving performance. However, the effects of awareness of perturbations on the resulting sensory and motor changes produced during motor learning are not well understood. Here, we use explicit instructions as well...
Preprint
Full-text available
An accurate estimate of limb position is necessary for movement planning. Where we localize our unseen hand after a reach depends on felt hand position, or proprioception, but this is usually neglected in favour of predicted sensory consequences based on efference copies of motor commands. Both sources of information should contribute, so here we s...
Article
Full-text available
Adapting reaches to altered visual feedback not only leads to motor changes, but also to shifts in perceived hand location; “proprioceptive recalibration”. These changes are robust to many task variations and can occur quite rapidly. For instance, our previous study found both motor and sensory shifts arise in as few as 6 rotated-cursor training tr...
Article
Full-text available
Is the neural control of movements towards moving targets independent to that of static targets? In the following experiments, we used a visuomotor rotation adaptation paradigm to examine the extent to which adapting arm movements to static targets generalize to that of moving targets (i.e. pursuit or tracking). In the first and second experiments,...
Article
Full-text available
[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0163556.].
Article
Full-text available
Training to reach with rotated visual feedback results in adaptation of hand movements, which persist when the perturbation is removed (reach aftereffects). Training also leads to changes in felt hand position, which we refer to as proprioceptive recalibration. The rate at which motor and proprioceptive changes develop throughout training is unknow...
Article
Full-text available
During motor adaptation the discrepancy between predicted and actually perceived sensory feedback is thought to be minimized, but it can be difficult to measure predictions of the sensory consequences of actions. Studies attempting to do so have found that self-directed, unseen hand position is mislocalized in the direction of altered visual feedba...
Article
Full-text available
When subjects reach in a novel visuomotor environment (e.g. while viewing a cursor representing their hand that is rotated from their hand's actual position), they typically adjust their movements (i.e. bring the cursor to the target), thus reducing reaching errors. Additionally, research has shown that reaching with altered visual feedback of the...
Article
Full-text available
When reaching towards objects, the human central nervous system (CNS) can actively compensate for two different perturbations simultaneously (dual adaptation), though this does not simply occur upon presentation. Dual adaptation is made more difficult when the desired trajectories and targets are identical and hence do not cue the impending perturb...
Article
Full-text available
It has been suggested that people with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), or other similar connective tissue disorders, may have proprioceptive impairments, the reason for which is still unknown. We recently found that EDS patients were less precise than healthy controls when estimating their felt hand's position relative to visible peripheral reference...
Article
Full-text available
Visuomotor learning results in changes in both motor and sensory systems (Cressman and Henriques 2009), such that reaches are adapted and sense of felt hand position recalibrated after reaching with altered visual feedback of the hand. Moreover, visuomotor learning has been shown to generalize such that reach adaptation achieved at a trained target...
Article
Full-text available
When reaching for remembered target locations, it has been argued that the brain primarily relies on egocentric metrics and especially target position relative to gaze when reaches are immediate, but that the visuo-motor system relies stronger on allocentric (i.e., object-centered) metrics when a reach is delayed. However, previous reports from our...
Article
Full-text available
We have recently shown that visuomotor adaptation following reaches with a misaligned cursor not only induces changes in an individual's motor output, but their proprioceptive sense of hand position as well. Long-term changes are seen in motor adaptation; however, very little is known about the retention of changes in felt hand position. We sought...
Article
Studies have shown that adapting one's reaches in one location in the workspace can generalize to other novel locations. Generalization of this visuomotor adaptation is influenced by the location of novel targets relative to the trained location such that reaches made to novel targets that are located far from the trained target direction (i.e., ~2...
Article
Full-text available
The location of a remembered reach target can be encoded in egocentric and/or allocentric reference frames. Cortical mechanisms for egocentric reach are relatively well described, but the corresponding allocentric representations are essentially unknown. Here, we used an event-related fMRI design to distinguish human brain areas involved in these t...
Article
Full-text available
We have shown that when subjects reach with continuous, misaligned visual feedback of their hand, their reaches are adapted and proprioceptive sense of hand position is recalibrated to partially match the visual feedback (Salomonczyk et al., 2011). It is unclear if similar changes arise after reaching with visual feedback that is provided only at t...
Article
Full-text available
Counter to current and widely accepted hypotheses that sensorimotor transformations involve converting target locations in spatial memory from an eye-fixed reference frame into a more stable motor-based reference frame, we show that this is not strictly the case. Eye-centered representations continue to dominate reach control even during movement e...
Article
Full-text available
Reaching movements are rapidly adapted following training with rotated visual feedback of the hand (motor recalibration). Our laboratory has also found that visuomotor adaptation results in changes in estimates of felt hand position (proprioceptive recalibration) in the direction of the visuomotor distortion (Cressman and Henriques 2009, 2010; Cres...
Article
Reaching with visual feedback that is misaligned with respect to the actual hand's location leads to changes in reach trajectories (i.e., visuomotor adaptation). Previous studies have also demonstrated that when training to reach with misaligned visual feedback of the hand, the opposite hand also partially adapts, providing evidence of intermanual...
Article
Eye-hand coordination is a crucial element of goal-directed movements. However, few studies have looked at the extent to which unconstrained movements of the eyes and hand made to targets influence each other. We studied human participants who moved either their eyes or both their eyes and hand to one of three static or flashed targets presented in...
Article
Full-text available
Reaching movements are rapidly adapted following training with rotated visual feedback of the hand. Our laboratory has also found that this visuomotor adaptation results in changes in estimates of felt hand position (proprioceptive recalibration) in the direction of the visuomotor distortion (Cressman and Henriques in J Neurophysiol 102:3505-3518,...
Article
Previous results suggest that the brain predominantly relies on a constantly updated gaze-centered target representation to guide reach movements when no other visual information is available. In the present study, we investigated whether the addition of reliable visual landmarks influences the use of spatial reference frames for immediate and dela...
Article
Reaching to targets with misaligned visual feedback of the hand leads to changes in proprioceptive estimates of hand position and reach aftereffects. In such tasks, subjects are able to make use of two error signals: the discrepancy between the desired and actual movement, known as the sensorimotor error signal, and the discrepancy between visual a...
Article
Full-text available
Previously, we observed changes in the scale, rotation, and location of drawn shapes when subjects simultaneously performed a secondary task, but not in the shape or proportion of the drawing. We suggested the secondary task impacted motor planning and execution or proprioception of the primary task. To isolate for proprioceptive effects, here we u...
Article
Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) provides a unique window into human brain function since it can reversibly alter the functioning of specific brain circuits. Basal ganglia-cortical circuits are thought to be excessively noisy in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), based in part on the lack of specificity of propriocep...
Article
This research explored specific contextual cues that might facilitate human motor learning. Using a dual adaptation task, humans performed manual reaches to visual targets while experiencing a 30° clockwise or counterclockwise rotation, which randomly alternated between trials, of a seen cursor representing their unseen hand. Groups had different c...
Article
Full-text available
Many studies have shown that reaching movements to visual targets can rapidly adapt to altered visual feedback of hand motion (i.e., visuomotor rotation) and generalize to new target directions. This generalization is thought to reflect the acquisition of a neural representation of the novel visuomotor environment that is localized to the particula...
Article
Full-text available
Grasping behaviors require the selection of grasp-relevant object dimensions, independent of overall object size. Previous neuroimaging studies found that the intraparietal cortex processes object size, but it is unknown whether the graspable dimension (i.e., grasp axis between selected points on the object) or the overall size of objects triggers...
Chapter
Centered on three themes, this book explores the latest research in plasticity in sensory systems, focusing on visual and auditory systems. It covers a breadth of recent scientific study within the field including research on healthy systems and diseased models of sensory processing. Topics include visual and visuomotor learning, models of how the...
Article
When reaching for an object in the environment, the brain often has access to multiple independent estimates of that object's location. For example, if someone places their coffee cup on a table, then later they know where it is because they see it, but also because they remember how their reaching limb was oriented when they placed the cup. Intuit...
Article
Full-text available
ABSTRACT Motor learning, in particular motor adaptation, is driven by information from multiple senses. For example, when arm control is faulty, vision, touch, and proprioception can all report on the arm's movements and help guide the adjustments necessary for correcting motor error. In recent years we have learned a lot about how the brain integr...
Article
When reaching to remembered target locations following an intervening eye movement a systematic pattern of error is found indicating eye-centred updating of visuospatial memory. Here we investigated if implicit targets, defined only by allocentric visual cues, are also updated in an eye-centred reference frame as explicit targets are. Participants...