Denis Saunders

Denis Saunders

PhD

About

183
Publications
60,041
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Introduction
Denis Saunders was an honorary research fellow at the Division of Land and Water, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) resigning from that position in March 2021. Denis still conducts research on Conservation Biology and Ecology, particularly on Carnaby's Cockatoo, an endangered species.

Publications

Publications (183)
Article
Full-text available
Loss of nest hollows in eucalypt woodlands is a major cause of decline for a range of Australian native birds including Carnaby’s cockatoo Calyptorhynchus latirostris. Loss of breeding habitat, plus decay of natural hollows, results in fewer nest sites for this species. Provision of artificial nesting hollows for Carnaby’s cockatoo is a recent part...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated whether the plumage patterns of Australian Magpies Cracticus tibicen, a medium-sized, black and white bird, common over most of Australia and Tasmania, including cities and towns, were sufficiently different and distinctive to allow humans to identify individual birds. Eighty participants took part in our pattern matching experiment...
Article
The ecology of one breeding population of Carnaby's Cockatoo Calyptorhynchus latirostris has been studied at Coomallo Creek, Western Australia, since 1969. A wildfire destroyed breeding habitat in part of the study area and adjoining areas in late December 2009. An increase in the number of breeding attempts the following year suggested that hollow...
Article
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Article
Carnaby’s cockatoo, Calyptorhynchus latirostris, is endemic to south-western Australia. It has undergone a majordeclineinrange andabundanceasaresult ofextensiveremovalofbreedingandforaginghabitat. Itisnowclassified as endangered by the State of Western Australia, theAustralian government, and internationally. In order to plan effective conservation...
Article
Carnaby’s cockatoo Calyptorhynchus latirostris is endemic to southwestern Australia. It has undergone a major decline in range and abundance as a result of extensive removal of breeding and foraging habitat. It is now classified as endangered by the State of Western Australia, the Australian government, and internationally. In order to plan effecti...
Article
Full-text available
This essay discusses two waves of settlement by Homo sapiens of continental Australia; the first over 60000 years ago, and the second less than 250 years ago. The failure of the second wave of Homo sapiens to understand the way the first wave had changed the biotic composition has led to major environmental problems.
Article
Full-text available
The ecology and behaviour of the endangered Carnaby’s Cockatoo Calyptorhynchus latirostris have been studied in detail at Coomallo Creek in the northern wheatbelt of Western Australia from 1969 until the present. Results of research on this breeding population conducted on individually marked birds from 1970 to 1990 were compared with results from...
Article
The ecology and behaviour of the endangered Carnaby’s Cockatoo Calyptorhynchuslatirostris have been studied in detail at Coomallo Creek in the northern wheatbelt of Western Australia from 1969 until the present. Results of research on this breeding population conducted on individually marked birds from 1970 to 1990 were compared with results from a...
Article
Full-text available
The endangered Western Australian endemic Carnaby's Cockatoo Calyptorhynchus latirostris was studied by Denis Saunders from 1968 to 1996, and by Rick Dawson and Denis Saunders from 2009 to 2016. One breeding population at Coomallo Creek in the northern wheatbelt of Western Australia was studied intensively from 1969 to 1976, and then monitored in e...
Article
Measuring how land-use changes affect the availability of resources for threatened species is critical for conservation policy and management. Combining demographic population models with models of food supply provides a means of quantifying the relative effects of land-use change and life-history characteristics on population viability. However, f...
Article
Full-text available
The ecology of a population of the endangered Carnaby's Cockatoo, Calyptorhynchus latirostris, was studied from 1969 to 2015, with breeding data collected for 28 of those years. Data were available on the known breeding failure rates of females of known age (banded as nestlings in the study area) and females of unknown age (banded as adults), and o...
Article
This study determined methods for identifying individual Carnaby's Cockatoo Calyptorhynchus latirostris using natural variations in markings, to assist future research and management Photographs of wild and captive cockatoos and museum specimens were studied and a variety of useful identification characteristics were found. These included marks on...
Data
Updated dataset supporting the publication: The birds of “Koobabbie” in the northern wheatbelt of Western Australia (1987-2011) and the contribution of the farm to conservation of the region’s avifauna by D A Saunders and A Doley Pacfic Conservation Biology
Article
Full-text available
It is important to know the age of nestling birds for many ecological and behavioural studies. Various methods have been developed for individual species; most are based on measurements of growth in wings, tarsi or heads/bills, or observations of changes in size, plumage and behaviour over time. However, techniques for aging nestlings have not been...
Article
Full-text available
D enis Saunders is a rare sort – almost as rare as the bird species he has devoted nearly half a century trying to save. As a university graduate with a degree in zoology, he never envisaged he would spend the next 47 years investigating ways to help slow the decline of Carnaby's cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus latirostris), once thought to be the same a...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Two hundred years of intensive land use and land management has transformed the condition of native vegetation, particularly in southern and eastern Australia. Many types of native vegetation are highly fragmented and modified. In central and northern Australia the effects of land use and land management pressures have been less intensive, neverthe...
Article
Full-text available
White N (2014) Nature conservation on agricultural land: a case study of the endangered Carnaby's Cockatoo Calyptorhynchus latirostris breeding at Koobabbie in the northern wheatbelt of Western Australia. Nature Conservation 9: 19–43. doi: 10.3897/ natureconservation.9.8385 This paper is dedicated to the late John Doley (1937–2007), whose wise coun...
Article
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The purpose of this application, under Article 75.6 of the Code, is to conserve prevailing usage of the species names Calyptorhynchus baudinii Lear, 1832 and Calyptorhynchus latirostris Carnaby, 1948, long established for two endemic cockatoos in southwestern Australia (Lear, 1832). The whereabouts of the holotype of C. baudinii Lear, 1832 (Baudin'...
Article
The loss of hollow-bearing trees and lack of replacements are important issues throughout the world where development of intensive agriculture has resulted in the reduction and fragmentation of natural woodlands. Many species of animal depend on hollows (cavities) for breeding and shelter, and are impacted by these changes. One such species is the...
Article
We examined how the threatened and endemic white-tailed black cockatoos of Western Australia have responded genetically to recent and comprehensive habitat loss with the ultimate aim of identifying units for conservation. We assessed the population structure, connectivity and genetic diversity at spatial and temporal scales for Calyptorhynchus baud...
Article
Full-text available
The avifauna of Koobabbie, a 7,173 ha wheat and sheep property in the northern wheatbelt of Western Australia with 41.5% the property under remnant native vegetation, was monitored on a weekly basis from May 1987 to December 2011. Recorded during this period were 131 species, comprising 55 residents, seven regular visitors, 14 irregular visitors an...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, we present a step-by-step guide on how to write a paper for successful publication in a peer-reviewed journal. We propose a ten-step approach to the entire process of paper writing from preparation, manuscript writing, and submission to the stages of peer-review and revision. The steps include defining paper objectives, authorship, j...
Article
Full-text available
Of the five species of black cockatoo in the genus Calyptorhynchus, those species with red tail bands (Red-tailed Black Cockatoo and Glossy Black Cockatoo) lay clutches of only one egg and those with white or yellow tail bands (Carnaby’s Cockatoo, Baudin’s Cockatoo and Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo) usually lay clutches of two. The breeding of the e...
Article
The loss of hollow-bearing trees and lack of replacement are important issues throughout the world where development of intensive agriculture has resulted in the reduction and fragmentation of natural woodlands. Many species of animal depend on hollows (cavities) for breeding and shelter, and are impacted by these changes. One such species is the e...
Article
Full-text available
Enhancing our Heritage: Conservation for 21st Century New Zealanders: Ways forward from the Tahi Group of Concerned Scientists JOHN CRAIG1, HENRIK MOLLER2 , DAVID NORTON3 , DENIS SAUNDERS4 and MORGAN WILLIAMS5 New Zealanders are constantly reminded of their degraded environment and the threatened status of their unique plants, animals and ecosyste...
Article
Birds use a number of environmental cues to time their breeding season to maximise their chances of raising young when food is most abundant. Such cues include photoperiod, temperature and rainfall. In very arid regions, birds may start egg-laying with the onset of rain to allow fledging to coincide with the availability of grass seeds. However the...
Article
New Zealanders are constantly reminded of their degraded environment and the threatened status of their unique plants, animals and ecosystems. Instead of presenting these as symptoms of unsustainable living and the socio-economic system that rewards this, there has been a propensity to treat these as independent problems needing individual solution...
Article
The avifauna of Koobabbie, a 7 173 ha wheat and sheep property in the northern wheatbelt of Western Australia with 41.5% the property under remnant native vegetation, was monitored on a weekly basis from May 1987 to December 2011. Recorded during this period were 131 species, comprising 55 residents, seven regular visitors, 14 irregular visitors an...
Article
Full-text available
This Editorial presents the focus, scope and policies of the inaugural issue of Nature Conservation, a new open access, peer-reviewed journal bridging natural sciences, social sciences and hands-on applications in conservation management. The journal covers all aspects of nature conservation and aims particularly at facilitating better interaction...
Article
Full-text available
Woopenatty was a 7,293 ha wheat-sheep property in the Geraldton Sandplains biogeographic region of the northern wheatbelt of Western Australia. Data were collected on the presence of bird species seen on a weekly basis on the property from October 1987 until the end of 2002. A total of 133 species was recorded from the property during this period w...
Data
Woopenatty was a 7,293 ha wheat-sheep property in the Geraldton Sandplains biogeographic region of the northern wheatbelt of Western Australia. Data were collected on the presence of bird species seen on a weekly basis on the property from October 1987 until the end of 2002. A total of 133 species was recorded from the property during this period w...
Article
IVOR Beatty, the man who made Pacific Conservation Biology possible, died on 29th June 2012 after a long illness. Ivor had many roles in the play that was his life. Only one was as a publisher and conservationist, but it is for that role that naturalists across Australia will remember him.
Article
Full-text available
In September 2009, three banded female Carnaby's Black Cockatoos Calyptorhynchus latirostris were identified at their nest sites by reading their leg bands. They had been banded as part of a 40-year study of the biology of a black cockatoo population at Coomallo Creek in the northern wheatbelt of Western Australia. Two techniques were employed to r...
Article
Full-text available
In September 2009, three banded female Carnaby’s Black Cockatoos Calyptorhynchus latirostris were identifi ed at their nest sites by reading their leg bands. They had been banded as part of a 40-year study of the biology of a black cockatoo population at Coomallo Creek in the northern wheatbelt of Western Australia. Two techniques were employed to...
Article
Full-text available
Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo is an endangered species which has undergone a dramatic decline in range and abundance in southwestern Australia. Between October 2009 and March 2010 the species was subjected to a possible outbreak of disease in one of its major breeding areas and exposed to an extremely hot day and a severe localized hail storm. In additi...
Chapter
Full-text available
Conceptual approaches used to understand conservation in fragmented landscapes are summarized in this chapter by Andrew F. Bennett and Denis A. Saunders. Destruction and fragmentation of habitats are major factors in the global decline of species, the modification of native plant and animal communities and the alteration of ecosystem processes. Hab...
Article
By the time you read this editorial, Pacific Conservation Biology may be fully online (http://www.informit.com.au/ ? see access instructions at the end of this article, or check for a link on the journal web site at http://pcb.murdoch.edu.au/). With support from the Oceania Section of the Society for Conservation Biology (http://www.conbio.org/Sect...
Article
The need to improve environmental management in Australia is urgent because human health, well-being and social stability all depend ultimately on maintenance of life-supporting ecological processes. Ecological science can inform this effort, but when issues are socially and economically complex the inclination is to wait for science to provide ans...
Article
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The avifauna of Rottnest Island, off the southwest coast of Western Australia, has been studied by three authorities from 1953-1963, 1980-1992 and 1998-2007. In addition, several annotated bird lists have been published since 1905. Over the period 1905 to 2007, 101 species have been recorded from the island, including 41 species of vagrant (species...
Article
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A brief study about the habits and habitats of Carnaby's Black Cockatoo which are considered as endangered species, is presented. The birds were tagged to find the breeding biology, behaviour and movements and their findings are discussed.
Chapter
There are many publications on wildlife corridors in the scientific and general literature. While there are fewer publications on landscape connectivity and stepping stones for wildlife, all of these terms are used in relation to landscape linkages. The issue of landscape connectivity is one of great scientific and conservation concern; however, th...
Article
The breeding biology of the short-billed form of the White-tailed Black Cockatoo was studied at two main study areas, Coomallo Creek, an area with large tracts of uncleared lands, and Manmanning, an area of extensive clearing with little native vegetation remaining. The study was based on individually marked birds. The actions of females selecting...
Article
Full-text available
The management of landscapes for biological conservation and ecologically sustainable natural resource use are crucial global issues. Research for over two decades has resulted in a large literature, yet there is little consensus on the applicability or even the existence of general principles or broad considerations that could guide landscape cons...
Chapter
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Article
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Nomadism has received surprisingly little attention in the ecological literature, and further work in this area is needed. The results of Woinarski’s reanalysis of our research findings are broadly similar to our own, and they support our original interpretation. However, his presentation is confusing and difficult to interpret.We used an informati...
Article
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We summarise the contributions of empiricists, modellers, and practitioners in this issue of Biodiversity and Conservation, and highlight the most important areas for future research on species survival in fragmented landscapes. Under the theme uncertainty in research and management, we highlight five areas for future research. First, we know littl...
Article
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We present a brief introduction to current attempts to understand and mitigate the effects of fragmentation on species survival. We provide a short overview of the contributions of empiricists, modellers, and practitioners in this issue of Biodiversity and Conservation, which were initiated during a workshop held in Australia in February 2002 on th...
Article
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We review recent studies of the impacts of disturbance on the fauna of the jarrah forest, south-western Australia. In particular, we examine five case studies that provide alternative approaches to researching disturbance impacts. Assessing site-based studies of patterns of fire regimes lead us to argue that point measures of frequency are inadequa...
Article
The condition of salmon gums Eucalyptus salmonophloia with large hollows in them in a 15-ha patch of remnant salmon gum-York gum E. loxophleba woodland in the northern wheatbelt of Western Australia was examined in 1978. The patch was an important breeding area for six species of cockatoo, including two endangered species. The patch was revisited i...
Article
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IN 1996, the Australian Federal, State and Territory governments ratified the National Strategy for the Conservation of Australia's Biological Diversity (Commonwealth of Australia 1996). This strategy states that production systems must be sustainable and not result in further loss of biological diversity. Although there is a considerable amount of...
Article
Sustainability in agricultural landscapes means that the use and management of ecological potential does not reduce its capacity to meet society’s future environmental, social and economic needs. Using this description of sustainability, Australian agricultural systems are far from sustainable at present. Removal of vast areas of native vegetation...
Article
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Nomadism in animals is a response to resource distributions that are highly variable in time and space. Using the avian fauna of the Mediterranean-climate region of southcentral Australia, we tested a number of variables to determine if they predicted nomadism. These variables were species body mass, the distance in body mass terms to the edge of a...
Chapter
Full-text available
This paper describes a proiect that produced an atlas of changes in the distribution and abundance of birds of the wheatbelt of Western Australia. The atlas was based on data collected by l87 community-based observers between 1987 and l990.The atlas also contained data from annotated bird f ists from l0 locations in the wheatbelt published before 1...
Article
This paper reviews the reasons why so many species of birds have declined in the eucalypt woodlands and associated habitats across the agricultural zone of southern Australia. The extent of habitat lost, over 90% in some regions, has led to the local extinction of some bird species, simply through random sampling effects. Habitat specialists and th...
Article
Graeme Talbot Smith was born in Adelaide on the 10th of February 1938. He spent some of his early childhood in Brisbane where his father was on the staff of General Douglas MacArthur during the latter part of the Second World War. After the war, his family moved to Melbourne where Graeme completed his secondary schooling. He then went to Melbourne...
Book
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In our dynamic, complex world, the increasing scale of human activity is a major driver of change. Environmental indicators are becoming widely used as a simple way to view our complex environment and assess the impacts of our activities and our management responses. The move to a broader use of indicators is relatively new, with rapidly developing...
Article
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The breeding population of Carnaby's Cockatoo at Coomallo Creek in the northern kwongan (sandheath) of southwestern Australia was monitored from 1969 to 1996. The cockatoos breed in hollows in trees in a belt of woodland through the centre of the study area and feed in adjacent kwongan. During the period, the study area was progressively and rapidl...
Article
Jim Lynch lost his long battle with cancer when he died at home at Shady Side Maryland, USA on 26th March. Despite the difficulties posed by his illness, he was carrying out fieldwork in Texas only three weeks before he died. Over the past year he produced several new papers and manuscripts and sustained an active correspondence with colleagues aro...