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Deidre Koolen-Bourke

Deidre Koolen-Bourke
Environmental Defence Society

PhD (law) LLM (Env. law)(Hons), LLB (Hons), BSc (Biology), BA (Anthropology)

About

10
Publications
241
Reads
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11
Citations
Introduction
Current research projects traverse a range of issues including: the regulatory frameworks that protect and manage public conservation land in Aotearoa New Zealand, wildlife and protected species legislation, the science-policy interface, and international models for landscape protection.
Additional affiliations
January 2007 - March 2020
University of Auckland
Position
  • Graduate Teaching Assistant and Exam Marker
January 2006 - December 2009
University of Auckland
Position
  • Tutor, Pasifika students Public Law tutorial programme
Description
  • Employed to design, prepare and teach the Pasifika students public law tutorial programme and exam workshops.
January 2006 - December 2007
University of Auckland
Position
  • Course Co-ordinator
Description
  • Employed to run two courses: ‘The Official Information Act: A Guide’ and ‘Preparing and Writing Submissions on Bills’.
Education
January 2004 - September 2005
University of Auckland
Field of study
  • Law
January 2000 - December 2002
University of Auckland
Field of study
  • Law
January 1991 - December 1994
University of Auckland
Field of study
  • Anthropology, Anthropology of Agriculture

Publications

Publications (10)
Thesis
Full-text available
This thesis is a study of social movement engagement with law. It examines the collective challenges raised by the Animal Rights Movement in order to improve the legal protections in place for animals. Because all struggles commence on old ground, advocates who choose to work with law are by necessity drawn to make compromises, simply in order to e...
Chapter
Full-text available
Chapter 8: International protected landscape models In earlier chapters of this report, we considered the concept of landscape and landscape protection regimes within Aotearoa New Zealand. This chapter takes a broader purview and investigates some of the more notable landscape protection models that have been employed in other countries including...
Book
Full-text available
The conservation management system is crucially important to Aotearoa New Zealand. It provides front line protection for most of the country’s remaining intact ecosystems, including the last remnants of now rare indigenous habitats and native species that rely on them for survival. It protects the environment in which mātauranga Māori evolved, whic...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The report investigates the role of science in the policy-making process in order to deepen understanding of the science-policy interface and the ways in which the scientific basis underpinning policy might be strengthened to better support good environmental decision-making. We found that current regulatory direction guiding decision making, pri...
Thesis
Full-text available
Between 250,000 and 300,000 animals are used for research, testing or teaching purposes in New Zealand each year. Animal experiments are a highly emotive issue. A large variety of organisations and individuals have an interest in how animals are used, from animal welfare agencies to commercial agribusiness operations. The adequacy of any regulator...

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Cited By

Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Good environmental outcomes rely on robust policy and decision-making processes that are both science-based but also reflective of community concerns and values. However, the integration of science and values within policy development is no easy task, and the line between the two is frequently blurred. The role that science plays in informing policy is complex. In practice, the science is often incomplete or highly contested. Expert advisory input may be sought on both matters of science (which informs policy) but also directly on policy (and so more politically nuanced matters). Advisory boards and committees often contain a mixture of scientific and lay members providing representation for a range of interest groups and concerns. How scientific input is incorporated in this process and integrated into policy, and how it is balanced against broader community concern, is often unclear. The purpose of this think piece is to explore the interface between science and policy through a detailed case study of the role that science played in the development of the National Policy Statement (NPS) for Freshwater Management. This project is a part of the Our Land and Water National Science Challenge
Project
This research project is examining will the laws that are designed to protect nature and manage public conservation land in Aotearoa New Zealand. It evaluates the utility of the present legal and policy framework and the institutional arrangements for its implementation. The aim is to identify potential reform where appropriate. The project investigates current and future challenges that the conservation system in New Zealand faces, the system’s purpose and functions, as well as options for legislative and institutional arrangements and the range of tools required to achieve optimal outcomes. It will also explore how Te Ao Māori might be better integrated into the legal and policy system.