Declan Kuch

Declan Kuch
Western Sydney University · Institute for Culture and Society (ICS)

BA/BSoc Sci (Macquarie); BA (Hons), Class 1, (UNSW); PhD (UNSW)

About

30
Publications
2,067
Reads
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151
Citations
Citations since 2016
16 Research Items
150 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022010203040
2016201720182019202020212022010203040

Publications

Publications (30)
Article
Full-text available
Demand-side management (DSM) is increasingly needed for answering electricity flexibility needs in the upcoming transformation of energy systems. Use of automation leads to better efficiency, but its acceptance is problematic since it is linked with several issues, such as privacy or loss of control. Different approaches investigate what should be...
Article
Full-text available
As health care systems have been recast as innovation assets, commercial aims are increasingly prominent within states’ health and medical research policies. Despite this, the reformulation of notions of social and of scientific value and of long-standing relations between science and the state that is occurring in research policies remains compara...
Article
For decades, the object of international climate governance has been greenhouse gases. The inadequacy of decarbonization based on this system has prompted calls to expand climate governance to include restrictions on fossil fuel supply. Such initiatives could rely on accountability frameworks based on fossil fuel reserves, production, or infrastruc...
Preprint
Electricity demand-side management (DSM) programs are becoming increasingly important to energy system managers in advanced industrialized countries, especially those with high renewable energy penetration. As energy user participation is paramount for their success but has proven to be difficult to obtain, we explore the usefulness of the ‘social...
Article
Electricity demand-side management (DSM) programs are becoming increasingly important to energy system managers in advanced industrialized countries, especially those with high renewable energy penetration. As energy user participation is paramount for their success but has proven to be difficult to obtain, we explore the usefulness of the 'social...
Conference Paper
Demand side management (DSM) requires automation in order to suitably address the fluctuating conditions within energy grids. One of the major challenges for introducing and maintaining automation solutions for DSM is to acquire a social license, that is, to ensure the acceptance and approval of the affected stakeholder communities. In this paper,...
Article
This paper analyses how precision has become a ubiquitous prefix in medicine, agriculture and education. The accompanying imagination in each of these domains is that “data” will enable greater predictive accuracy through new sensors and interfaces. In this paper, we aim to provide insights regarding the ways in which precision assemblages function...
Preprint
Full-text available
Review essay of Meloni, M. (2016) Political Biology: Science and Social Values in Human Heredity from Eugenics to Epigenetics, Palgrave Macmillan, Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire. and Reardon, J. (2017) The Postgenomic Condition: Ethics, Justice, and Knowledge After the Genome, University of Chicago Press, Chicago. analysing their relevance to c...
Chapter
Full-text available
The authors are Australia-based energy researchers who view a close link between access to energy data and the country's transition to a sustainable and just community-based energy future, which they argue is currently hampered by some major incumbent energy sector businesses and politicians. Rooftop solar (PV) panels are popular additions to Aust...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents a collaboration between social scientists and a chemist exploring the promises for new therapy development at the intersection between synthetic biology and nanotechnology. Drawing from ethnographic studies of laboratories and a recorded discussion between the three authors, we interrogate the metaphors that underpin what Macken...
Chapter
This chapter draws from an extensive study of grass-roots innovation in response to climate change challenges, across a continuum from social activism to social enterprise. We examine the diverse motivations of entrepreneurs for starting community-supported agricultural projects, car-sharing schemes or co-working spaces. First, we show how the vari...
Article
This article proposes an original theoretical approach to the analysis of community-level action for sustainability, focusing on its troubled relationship to the sharing economy. Through a conversation between scholarship on legal consciousness and diverse economies, it shows how struggles over transactional legality are a neglected site of activis...
Article
Full-text available
The distribution of national emissions specified in the UNFCCC’s annexes some 25 years ago have profoundly shifted, and with them, global political fault lines. China is now the leading emitter of greenhouse gases, a fact that conservative governments in high emitting countries use to quell climate policy ambitions domestically, delaying or cancell...
Research
Full-text available
Submission to Federal RET review 2014
Chapter
Who and what makes a difference to contemporary markets? The unnerving sense of collective disaster around crossing the two-degree Celsius ‘guardrail’ of global-warming emissions puts this question into stark relief: Can carbon markets save us by ‘civilizing markets’, as many hope, or are they part of the infrastructure that will hurtle us over the...
Chapter
Electricity production in Australia was progressively reformatted according to neo-liberal theories of self-correcting market efficiency throughout the 1990s. The resulting National Electricity Market (NEM) promised to eliminate the wastefulness and bureaucratic excesses of state bureaucratic regimes that were thought to be pandering to a narrow se...
Chapter
Joint Implementation and the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) were the key offset mechanisms developed following the Kyoto Protocol negotiations. They emerged in the year 2000 as a compromise between the industrialized countries’ fear of costly mitigation targets and developing countries’ demands for technology transfer, development aid and an ins...
Chapter
Technopolitics of classification is sorely lacking in much climate policy analysis. Policy details matter much more than the headline figures of emissions-reduction numbers imply. These numbers wrongly presume a common and agreed calculative ‘frame’, to use Michel Callon’s term for the often-unstated infrastructure of economic exchanges. This chapt...
Chapter
The conventional history of emissions trading underpinning debate about carbon emissions trading begins in the 1960s with American attacks on inflexible, ‘command and control’ regulations. This chapter challenges this reading of regulatory history, placing these developments in a longer history of pollution control whereby law and science interact...
Chapter
What we want to stress is the epistemological ambivalence and the contradictions of neo-liberalism — the ways that the fallibility of expert knowledge are alternately highlighted and downplayed — are marshalled as a vital defence mechanism against unwanted governmental intervention. (Davies and McGoey, 2012: 73) If we remain stuck in the short time...
Chapter
The case studies of emissions trading schemes in the preceding chapters have all been remarkably resistant to the kinds of civilizing processes proposed by Callon. Scheme after scheme has seen caps on carbon undermined by weak targets or overly generous offset provisions. The Australian federal government’s baseline-and-credit ‘Direct Action’ polic...
Article
1. The Rise Of Emissions Trading As A Market Mechanism And The Promise Of ' 'Civilized Markets ' ' 2. Marketizing Civil Regulation: Acid Rain Regulation As The Experimental Bridge To Carbon Markets 3. Governing Carbon Emissions: NSW GGAS 4. The Technopolitics Of National Carbon Accounts 5. ' 'Economists In The Wild ' ': Clean Development And The Gl...
Article
Full-text available
Coal Seam Gas (CSG) activities have mobilised new political coalitions across the traditional left/right political divide in the eastern Australian states. Through the charting of these activities we propose the concept of 'networked energy citizenship' to capture the tensions between fossil fuel capital and the rural and urban alliances that form...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
Collection of submissions from the Centre for Energy and Environmental Markets at UNSW