Deborah Padfield

Deborah Padfield
St George's, University of London | SGUL · Medical School

PhD

About

26
Publications
7,137
Reads
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158
Citations
Citations since 2017
15 Research Items
124 Citations
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Introduction
Deborah Padfield is a visual artist, Senior Lecturer in Arts & Health Humanities, St George's, University of London, where she is Director of its extra-curricular programme, Open Spaces and Associate Professor, Slade School of Fine Art, UCL. Collaborating with leading clinicians/academics, her research explores the potential of photographic images, co-created with people with pain, to facilitate doctor-patient communication. Latest book, Encountering Pain; hearing, seeing speaking (UCL Press).
Additional affiliations
October 2020 - October 2020
St George's, University of London
Position
  • Senior Lecturer
Description
  • Academic Lead for extra-curricular arts and humanities programme for Medical, Science and Healthcare students, Open Spaces (see https://www.sgul.ac.uk/for-students/student-experience/making-connections/open-spaces). Developing further provision of art and humanities opportunities for students, broadening horizons. Developing own research into the value of photographic images of pain as a communication tool and their ability to communicate (or not) transculturally.
March 2019 - present
St George's, University of London
Position
  • Lecturer
October 2017 - October 2019
St George's, University of London
Position
  • Fellow

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Full-text available
This article argues that visual images, particularly photographs, can provide an alternative visual language to communicate pain. It suggests that selected photographs of pain placed between clinician and patient can help trigger a more collaborative approach to dialogue within the consulting room. The participatory roles of artist and clinician as...
Article
Pain is invisible and its experience highly subjective, making it hard to communicate. This essay grew out of the Encountering Pain Conference at University College London that shared the findings of the face2face and Pain: Speaking the Threshold projects with patients, clinicians, academics, and artists. We explore narratives triggered by images c...
Article
Full-text available
The challenge for those treating or witnessing pain is to find a way of crossing the chasm of meaning between them and the person living with pain. This paper proposes that images can strengthen agency in the person with pain, particularly but not only in the clinical setting, and can create a shared space within which to negotiate meaning. It draw...
Article
Full-text available
This paper looks at whether we can bring art psychotherapy theory to understanding the role of art in a new context; the medical pain consultation, as part of an experimental arts in health research project. The project studied the introduction of a set of art images into chronic pain consultations, to help patients and doctors communicate complex...
Book
Full-text available
What is persistent pain? How do we communicate pain, not only in words but in visual images and gesture? How do we respond to the pain of another, and can we do it better? Can explaining how pain works help us handle it? Encountering Pain shares leading research into the potential value of visual images and non-verbal forms of communication as me...
Chapter
Face2face was a project where patients with facial pain collaborated with a visual artist to create photographic images that would expand the language around pain. These images have now been made into a pack of 54 pain cards which can be used with other patients to improve consultations between healthcare professionals and patients. Two patients wh...
Chapter
Full-text available
Abstract Pain is socially and culturally experienced. This chapter builds on previous research into the value of visual images for communicating pain in the UK, which evidenced ways in which images can improve doctor–patient interaction. It discusses ways in which photographs co-created with people living with chronic pain can be catalysts for disc...
Chapter
This chapter focuses on the National Portrait Gallery workshops and ways in which collaborative drawing and photographic processes acted as catalysts for improved understanding and communication between patients and clinicians. The face2face project explored how photographic images co-created with pain patients could expand pain dialogue in the con...
Article
Aims: To investigate how photographic images (Pain Cards) co-created by an artist and chronic pain patients could be used in groups of patients with burning mouth syndrome to facilitate characterization of their pain and its impact on quality of life. Methods: Ten groups of patients with burning mouth syndrome attending a 2.5-hour information se...
Chapter
Full-text available
Chapter
Full-text available
Pain is common and difficult to communicate or reduce into the verbal or numerical scales commonly used in clinical practice. Some academics have argued that pain resists description in language while others have argued conversely that it generates language. This chapter identifies the limitations of verbal language and current standardized scores...
Chapter
Full-text available
Pain is common and difficult to communicate or reduce into the verbal or numerical scales commonly used in clinical practice. Some academics have argued that pain resists description in language while others have argued conversely that it generates language. This chapter identifies the limitations of verbal language and current standardized scores...
Article
Full-text available
A variety of treatment outcomes in chronic pain are influenced by patient–clinician rapport. Patients often report finding it difficult to explain their pain, and this potential obstacle to mutual understanding may impede patient–clinician rapport. Previous research has argued that the communication of both patients and clinicians is facilitated by...
Article
Lancet: The art of medicine Padfield D, Chadwick T, Omand H ABSTRACT The body as image: image as body Pain is invisible and its experience highly subjective, making it hard to communicate. This essay grew out of the Encountering Pain Conference at University College London that shared the findings of the face2face and Pain: Speaking the Threshold p...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Pain consultations are often contested spaces where patient and clinician compete for the roles of speaker. Often patients are searching for mechanical explanations and clinicians for psychological ones - creating an impasse and causing distress to both parties. Meanwhile, as technology advances and we have increasing means of seeing inside a pers...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Background: Visual images may facilitate communication of pain in consultations. Objectives: In order to test whether photographic images of pain enrich the content and/or process of pain consultation, we compared patients’ and clinicians’ ratings of the consultation experience. Methods Photographic images of pain previously co-created by...
Article
Full-text available
Pain is unwanted, is unfortunately common, and remains essential for survival (i.e., evading danger) and facilitating medical diagnoses. This complex amalgamation of sensation, emotions, and thoughts manifests itself as pain behavior. Pain is a moti-vating factor for physician consultations 1 and for emergency department visits and is T he IASP def...
Thesis
Pain is difficult to communicate and constrict into the verbal or numerical scales commonly used. This thesis explores how photographic images can expand pain dialogue in the consulting room to include aspects of experience frequently omitted using traditional measures. It draws on material generated by the face2 face project, a collaboration with...
Article
Full-text available
To ascertain the influence of images depicting different qualities of pain on unselected outpatient pain clinic consultations. A resource of 64 colour images depicting different qualities of pain was given to patients in clinic waiting rooms, which they could take into consultations and use as a focus for discussion with clinicians. A questionnaire...
Book
Although we all experience pain it remains extremely difficult to communicate. Perceptions of Pain is a moving and startling collection of images that explores the interface between doctor and patient, photographer and subject, maker and viewer, science and art. Additional texts by Professor Brian Hurwitz, Doctor Charles Pither and Deborah Padfield...
Article
Full-text available

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I have video recordings of clinician-patient interactions where the changes observable in non-verbal behavour have become increasingly interesting.  I am wondering what methods others have used to analyse this and if there are any validated measures which can pick up these subtle and nuanced changes?

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Archived project
Project
To explore whether it is/was possible to develop a visual language for pain to improve doctor-patient interaction
Project
Pain: speaking the threshold Collaborators: Prof Sharon Morris Slade School of Fine Art, UCL Dr Deborah Padfield Slade School of Fine Art, UCL Prof Joanna M. Zakrzewska University College London Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust (UCLH) Pain: Speaking the Threshold is a three-year interdisciplinary project to further research the value of visual images in the diagnosis and management of chronic pain. Funding comes from the Centre for Humanities Interdisciplinary Research Projects (CHIRP) Scheme. It brings together art and medicine in the tradition of the founding professors of the Slade who were also surgeons, addressing the public understanding of pain through both science and the humanities. The project builds on the face2face project at University College London Hospitals (UCLH) and the doctoral research of Deborah Padfield, co-supervised by Dr. Sharon Morris (Slade School of Fine Art, UCL) and Prof. Joanna M. 
Zakrzewska (UCLH). Accessing Prof. Zakrzewska’s clinics, Padfield co-created with patients over 1,000 photographic images that reflected and symbolised their pain. From this material Padfield made a pilot pack of 54 pain cards, which were trialed as a communication tool in clinical consultations at UCLH. Video recording were made of 20 base-line consultations, without images, and 20 study consultations with images. Taking unique data (video recordings and transcripts of pain consultations and co-created photographic images of pain) a new expanded interdisciplinary team will produce an in-depth analysis of the effects of using visual imagery in the clinical setting, using theories of narrative, metaphor and translation drawn from Linguistics; methodologies in Medical Anthropology and History of Medicine; theories of empathy and transference from Health Psychology and Psychoanalysis. The project hopes to evidence ways in which photographs of pain placed between clinician and patient can increase rapport and improve the quality of medical dialogue. Interdisciplinary team: Prof Joanna Bourke: History: Birkbeck College Dr Sahra Gibbon: Medical Anthropology: UCL Helen Omand: Art Psychotherapy: The Studio Upstairs Prof Elena Semino: Linguistics and English Language: Lancaster University Dr Amanda C de C Williams: Psychology: UCL & UCLH Research Assistants: Judy Addai-Davis Research Department of Clinical, Educational & Health Psychology, UCL Tom Chadwick MSc, Social Research Methods, LSE Project Assistant: Mariana Gomes Goncalves MFA, Fine Art, Slade School of Fine Art For further information please contact: d.padfield@ucl.ac.uk See also: Information about 'Pain Speaking the Threshold Information about Deborah Padfield