Deborah G Mccullough

Deborah G Mccullough
Michigan State University | MSU · Department of Entomology

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227
Publications
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Publications

Publications (227)
Article
Quantifying changes in ash (Fraxinus spp.) demography and emerald ash borer (EAB; Agrilus planipennis) carrying capacity in forested ecosystems is essential for understanding impacts of this invader and projecting future species composition in aftermath forests in North America. We inventoried green ash (F. pennsylvanica) and black ash (F. nigra) t...
Article
Management responses to invasive forest insects are facilitated by the use of detection traps ideally baited with species-specific semiochemicals. Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, is currently invading North American forests, and since its detection in 2002, development of monitoring tools has been a primary research objective. We...
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Emerald ash borer (EAB), (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire), first identified in 2002 in southeast Michigan, has caused catastrophic ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality in forests within the core of the invasion and has spread to 35 states and five Canadian provinces. Little is known about persistence and densities of EAB populations in post-invasion sites...
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Despite catastrophic ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality observed by the mid 2000’s in the epicenter of the emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) invasion in southeast Michigan, we noticed numerous live white ash (Fraxinus americana L.) in some forests in this region. We inventoried overstory trees and regeneration in 2015 in 28 white a...
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We assessed density of emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) larvae over a 6-yr period by felling and sampling a total of 315 green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.) trees that were left untreated or treated with imidacloprid, dinotefuran, or emamectin benzoate products at 1-yr, 2-yr, or 3-yr intervals. Our s...
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Emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire), an invasive forest insect first identified in southeastern Michigan in 2002, is established in at least 32 US states and three Canadian provinces. Ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality rates in some forested areas exceed 90%, but to date, little is known about the potential effects of EAB-caused ash...
Article
Emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive phloem-feeding buprestid, has killed hundreds of millions of ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees in the United States and two Canadian provinces. We evaluated EAB persistence in post-invasion sites and compared EAB adult captures and larval densities in 24 forested...
Article
Emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire), the most destructive forest insect to have invaded North America, has killed hundreds of millions of forest and landscape ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees. Several artificial trap designs to attract and capture EAB beetles have been developed to detect, delineate, and monitor infestations. Double-de...
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Full-text available
Effective survey methods to detect and monitor recently established, low-density infestations of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), remain a high priority because they provide land managers and property owners with time to implement tactics to slow emerald ash borer population growth and the progression of a...
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We review and synthesize information on invasions of nonnative forest insects and diseases in the United States, including their ecological and economic impacts, pathways of arrival, distribution within the United States, and policy options for reducing future invasions. Nonnative insects have accumulated in United States forests at a rate of ∼2.5...
Article
Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive phloem-feeding insect native to Asia, threatens at least 16 North American ash (Fraxinus) species and has killed hundreds of millions of ash trees in landscapes and forests. We conducted laboratory bioassays to assess the relative efficacy of systemic insectici...
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Information on the pattern and rate of spread for invasive wood- and phloem-feeding insects, including the emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire), is relatively limited, largely because of the difficulty of detecting subcortical insects at low densities. From 2008 to 2011, grids of girdled and subsequently debarked ash (Fraxinus sp...
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Eradication is the deliberate elimination of a species from an area. Given that international quarantine measures can never be 100% effective, surveillance for newly arrived populations of nonnative species coupled with their eradication represents an important strategy for excluding potentially damaging insect species. Historically, eradication ef...
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Economic and ecological impacts of ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality resulting from emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) invasion are severe in forested, residential and urban areas. Management options include girdling ash trees to attract ovipositing adult beetles then destroying infested trees before larvae develop or protecting as...
Article
Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, has become the most destructive forest insect to invade North America. Unfortunately, tactics to manage A. planipennis are limited and difficult to evaluate, primarily because of the difficulty of detecting and delineating new infestations. Here we use data from a unique resource, the SL.ow A.sh M.o...
Article
Fraxinus spp. (ash) trees are widely found in urban areas across the U.S. where they experience varying degrees and types of stress. Fertilizer and paclobutrazol (PB) are marketed as a means to alter growth and enhance tree vigor. Fertilizer typically increases radial growth but may reduce root: shoot ratios. Paclobutrazol, a gibberellin inhibitor,...
Article
Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) has killed millions of Fraxinus spp. trees in North America. While all Fraxinus species assessed to date can be colonized, A. planipennis attraction to host trees varies among species and with tree health. We established a plantation of 105 trees (21 trees each of four North American species F...
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Full-text available
The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is a destructive invasive pest that threatens North American ash (Fraxinus (Oleaceae)) and inflicts substantial aesthetic, ecological, and economic damage in urban forests and rural woodlands. Understanding adult EAB dispersal and spread of infestations is critica...
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Full-text available
Practical and effective strategies to manage emerald ash borer (EAB) ( Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire; Coleoptera: Buprestidae) are increasingly important given economic and ecological impacts of this invader. While EAB detection remains challenging, tactics are available to protect individual ash ( Fraxinus Linnaeus; Oleaceae) trees and slow EAB po...
Conference Paper
Since its discovery in 2002 in the Detroit metro area in southeast Michigan, emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) has become the most destructive forest pest to invade North America. Millions of ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees have been killed and nearly 8 billion trees in U.S. forests are threatened by EAB. P...
Conference Paper
Many species of Fraxinus have not been adequately evaluated for their susceptibility to emerald ash borer (EAB). We assessed the susceptibility of several North American, European and Asian ash species to EAB under controlled laboratory conditions in no-choice bioassays using bolts collected from the limbs of non-infested ash trees growing at the A...
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Full-text available
Assessing emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) impacts in North American forests is essential for projecting future species composition of stands invaded by this phloem-feeding pest. We surveyed all species of overstory trees and regeneration in 2010 and 2011 in 24 forested sites with a major component of green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvan...
Article
AimEmerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis was identified in 2002 as the cause of extensive ash (Fraxinus spp.) decline and mortality in Detroit, Michigan, and has since killed millions of ash trees in the US and Canada. When discovered, it was not clear how long it had been present or at what location the invading colony started. We used dendrochron...
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The collaborative webinar project Emerald Ash Borer University (EAB-U) was established in 2009 to address pressing communications needs regarding the invasive emerald ash borer in the midst of national financial crisis. The 40 EAB-U webinars to date have been viewed over 10,000 times. Results of a post-webinar survey evaluating audience composition...
Article
Black ash (Fraxinus nigra Marshall) trees are an important cultural resource and provide the wood used for traditional contemporary basketry by numerous Native American and First Nation tribes in the U.S.A. and Canada. The invasion and subsequent spread of emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) threatens the ash r...
Conference Paper
The SLow Ash Mortality (SLAM) Pilot Project was a multi-agency effort conducted from 2008 to 2011 to develop, implement and evaluate a strategy to integrate available management options to suppress a building population of emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, located in Moran and St. Ignace, Mackinac County, Michigan. The primary goal of t...
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Despite substantial increases in public awareness and biosecurity systems, introductions of non-native arthropods remain an unwelcomed consequence of escalating rates of international trade and travel. Detection of an established but unwanted non-native organism can elicit a range of responses, including implementation of an eradication program. Pr...
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Bio-invasions occur in management mosaics where local control affects spread and damage across political boundaries. We address two obstacles to local implementation of optimal regional control of a bio-invasion that damages public and private resources across jurisdictions: lack of local funds to protect the public resource and lack of access to p...
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Results of numerous trials to evaluate artificial trap designs and lures for detection of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, the emerald ash borer, have yielded inconsistent results, possibly because of different A. planipennis population densities in the field sites. In 2010 and 2011, we compared 1) green canopy traps, 2) purple canopy traps, 3) green...
Article
Since its accidental introduction from Asia, the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), has killed millions of ash trees in North America. As it continues to spread, it could functionally extirpate ash with devastating economic and ecological impacts. Little was known about EAB when it was first discovered...
Article
Full-text available
Detection of newly established populations of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, the most destructive forest insect to invade the United States, remains challenging. Regulatory agencies currently rely on artificial traps, consisting of baited three-sided panels suspended in the canopy of ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees. Detection trees represent another surv...
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AimGeographical variation in numbers of established non-native species provides clues to the underlying processes driving biological invasions. Specifically, this variation reflects landscape characteristics that drive non-native species arrival, establishment and spread. Here, we investigate spatial variation in damaging non-native forest insect a...
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Beech scale (Cryptococcus fagisuga Lindinger) (Hemiptera: Eriococcidae) is an invasive forest insect established in the eastern United States and Canada. It predisposes American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrhart) trees to infection by Neonectria spp. Fungi causing beech bark disease. White wax secreted by the diminutive scales obscures individual in...
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Emerald ash borer (EAB; Agrilus planipennis) has killed millions of ash trees and threatens ash throughout North America, and long-term persistence of ash will depend on the potential for regeneration. We quantified ash demography, including mortality and regeneration, of Fraxinus americana (white ash), Fraxinus pennsylvanica (green ash), and Fraxi...
Conference Paper
Since the discovery of emerald ash borer (EAB, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) in 2002, a variety of treatments have become available to protect Fraxinus spp (ash). Tree defense priming using paclobutrazol (PB), a gibberellin inhibitor, could be another option. Studies suggest PB application can enhance vigor and defensive response of some tree spec...
Conference Paper
Beech Bark Disease (BBD) has spread across much of the northern range of American Beech since its arrival in eastern Canada around 1890. The nonindigenous beech scale, Cryptococcus fagisuga Lind., colonizes the outer bark of beech trees, facilitating the entry of the cambium-killing Neonectria spp. pathogen. Infestations of beech scale were first i...
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The fungal entomopathogen Entomophaga maimaiga has provided important biological control of gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.), since the first epizootics occurred in the northeastern United States in 1989. Epizootics are initiated by germination of soil-borne resting spores, which are highly sensitive to spring temperature and moisture. We compared...
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Catastrophic mortality of North American ash (Fraxinus spp.) caused by Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire has been attributed to the lack of coevolved resistance between native ash species and this Asian invader. Although A. planipennis host preference or tree resistance can vary, all North American ash species are presumably highly vulnerable to A. pla...
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Wood-boring beetles in the family Cerambycidae (Coleoptera) play important roles in many forest ecosystems. However, increasing numbers of invasive cerambycid species are transported to new countries by global commerce and threaten forest health in the United States and worldwide. Our goal was to identify effective detection tools for a broad array...
Article
Since the discovery of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (emerald ash borer) in 2002, researchers have tested several methods of chemical control. Soil drench or trunk injection products containing imidacloprid are commonly used to control adults. However, efficacy can be highly variable and may be due to uneven translocation of systemic insecticides....
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Full-text available
Invasive species increasingly threaten ecosystems, food production, and human welfare worldwide. Hundreds of eradication programs have targeted a wide range of nonnative insect species to mitigate the economic and ecological impacts of biological invasions. Many such programs used multiple tactics to achieve this goal, but interactions between tact...
Article
Full-text available
Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), a phloem-feeding pest of ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees native to Asia, was first discovered in North America in 2002. Since then, A. planipennis has been found in 15 states and two Canadian provinces and has killed tens of millions of ash trees. Understanding the probability of...
Article
Full-text available
Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive pest native to Asia, has killed millions of ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees in North America since it was first discovered there in 2002. As of autumn 2011, A. planipennis has been detected in 15 US states and two Canadian provinces. A pilot project to slow the onset...
Article
Full-text available
Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), a phloem-feeding beetle native to East Asia, was first discovered in southeast Michigan and Essex County, Ontario, in June 2002 and has since killed millions of ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees in North America. Initial studies in southeast Michigan indicated that the life cycle o...
Article
Beech scale (Cryptococcus fagisuga Lind.) (Hemiptera; Coccidae), an invasive insect associated with beech bark disease, was discovered in 2000 in a localized area of northwest Lower Michigan and one area in the eastern Upper Peninsula. From 2005 to 2009, we surveyed 809 sites in 73 Michigan counties to determine whether American beech (Fagus grandi...
Conference Paper
Beech Bark Disease (BBD) has spread across much of the northern range of American Beech since its arrival in eastern Canada around 1890. The nonindigenous beech scale, Cryptoccus fagisuga Lind., colonizes the outer bark of beech trees, facilitating the entry of the cambium-killing Neonectria spp. pathogen. Infestations of beech scale were first ide...
Conference Paper
In North America, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) attacks healthy and stressed trees within the genus Fraxinus regardless of genetic origin. However, host feeding preference or the ability of trees to resist A. planipennis varies across Asian and N. American Fraxinus species. To date, the mechanism or suite of mechanisms tha...
Conference Paper
Emerald ash borer (EAB), (Agrilus planipennis Feirmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is a phloem feeding beetle native to Asia. First discovered in Detroit, MI and Windsor, Ontario in 2002, dendrochronological studies indicated EAB first became established in North America at least six to ten years earlier in the metro Detroit area. Since its arrival...
Article
Full-text available
Effective methods for early detection of newly established, low density emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) infestations are critically needed in North America. We assessed adult A. planipennis captures on four types of traps in a 16-ha site in central Michigan. The site was divided into 16 blocks, each comprised of four 50- by 50-m c...
Article
Full-text available
Effective methods are needed to protect ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) from emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive buprestid that has killed millions of North American ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees. We randomly assigned 175 ash trees (11.5-48.1 cm in diameter) in 25 blocks located in three study sites in Mich...
Data
Detailed economic and modeling methods. Part I describes the economic methods and data sources. Part II describes the database of non-native forest pests and the classification of their impacts. Part III describes the Bayesian model used to estimate total costs. (DOC)