Deborah Harvey

Deborah Harvey
Royal Holloway, University of London | RHUL · Department of Biological Sciences

About

47
Publications
15,466
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433
Citations
Citations since 2017
35 Research Items
323 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230204060
20172018201920202021202220230204060

Publications

Publications (47)
Preprint
Full-text available
According to the Latitudinal Biotic Interaction Hypothesis (LBIH), the general increase in biodiversity towards lower latitudes can be partially explained by an increase in the intensity of biotic interactions. While LBIH received some support for plant-herbivores interactions, much less is known about how higher trophic levels may contribute to sh...
Article
Full-text available
The phenology of fungal fruiting has changed in the UK over the last 70 years, but whether the associated mycophagous insects are able to exploit ‘out of season’ fruit bodies is unknown. This study focused on whether fungal baits can be used as a proxy to examine changes in fungal fruiting on insect communities. Using Agaricus bisporus as a bait, m...
Article
Evidence increasingly demonstrates nature engagement benefits. However, little evidence shows nature engagement provides children with a reflective perception of biodiversity, nor whether perception influ- ences children’s wellbeing and resilience. We explored the impact of weekly nature engagement in schoolgrounds on 509 eight-to-eleven- year-olds...
Article
Full-text available
Urbanization is an important driver of the diversity and abundance of tree‐associated insect herbivores, but its consequences for insect herbivory are poorly understood. A likely source of variability among studies is the insufficient consideration of intra‐urban variability in forest cover. With the help of citizen scientists, we investigated the...
Article
Full-text available
Simple Summary: The family Leiodidae include beetles adaptated to many various habitats and foods ranging from saprophagous by obligatory mycophagists to true ectoparasites. The phylogeny of the family is complex and still requires research. Larval stages have different characters to adults and provide a lot of phylogentically valuable data. Howeve...
Preprint
Urbanization is recognized as an important driver of the diversity and abundance of tree associated insect herbivores, but its consequences for insect herbivory are controversial. A likely source of variability among studies is the insufficient consideration of intra-urban variability in forest cover. With the help of citizen scientists, we investi...
Article
Full-text available
To address the decline in biodiversity, international cooperation in monitoring of threatened species is needed. Citizen science can play a crucial role in achieving this challenging goal, but most citizen science projects have been established at national or regional scales. Here we report on the establishment and initial findings of the European...
Article
Aim The strength of species interactions is traditionally expected to increase toward the Equator. However, recent studies have reported opposite or inconsistent latitudinal trends in the bottom‐up (plant quality) and top‐down (natural enemies) forces driving herbivory. In addition, these forces have rarely been studied together thus limiting previ...
Article
Full-text available
The dataset presented in this data paper supports "Breaking down insect stoichiometry into chitin-based and internal elemental traits: Patterns and correlates of continent-wide intraspecific variation in the largest European saproxylic beetle" (Orłowski et al. 2020) [1]. Here we present the supplementary data and description of methods on the follo...
Article
Full-text available
Scientific knowledge in the field of ecology is increasingly enriched by data acquired by the general public participating in citizen science (CS) programs. Yet, doubts remain about the reliability of such data, in particular when acquired by schoolchildren. We built upon an ongoing CS program, 'Oak Bodyguards', to assess the ability of schoolchild...
Preprint
Full-text available
Aim The strength of species interactions is traditionally expected to become stronger toward the Equator. However, recent studies have reported opposite or inconsistent latitudinal trends in the bottom-up (plant quality) and top-down (natural enemies) forces driving insect herbivory, possibly because these forces have rarely been studied concomitan...
Article
This investigation sought to discover whether engaging school children (aged 8–11) with nature could produce sustained improvements in mood and wellbeing in the long-term. We designed a program of biodiversity-focused activities carried out over one academic year in the school grounds. Participation in this program produced significant improvements...
Article
In this study, we aimed to understand the state of school grounds across Britain and how they are being used to support biodiversity conservation and pupils’ environmental education. We carried out an opt-in survey of schools across Britain, asking staff to report on habitats in their grounds and how they are used for learning. Our results showed t...
Preprint
Full-text available
Scientific knowledge in the field of ecology is increasingly enriched by data acquired by the general public participating in citizen science (CS) programs. Yet, doubts remain about the reliability of such data, in particular when acquired by school children. We built upon an ongoing CS program - Oak bodyguards - to assess the ability of European s...
Article
Full-text available
Lucanus cervus (L.), the stag beetle, is a saproxylic beetle species distributed widely across Europe. Throughout its distribution the species has exhibited pronounced declines and is widely considered threatened. Conservation efforts may be hindered by the lack of population genetic data and understanding of the spatial scale of population connect...
Data
Spatial clustering results based on microsatellite genotypes of Lucanus cervus. (A) The BAPS results showing four clusters, (B-D) STRUCTURE results with (B) K = 2 main clusters involving all samples, and with (C) K = 2 subclusters and (D) K = 4 subclusters after excluding Greek samples assigned to one cluster in (B; indicated in pink). The estimate...
Data
ΔK calculated for each K from 1 to 20 using the Evanno method in STRUCTURE HARVESTER. This is based on STRUCTURE results (A) using all samples and (B) after excluding the Greek samples. (TIF)
Data
Microsatellite multiplex and simplex primer concentrations, fluorescent labels and annealing temperatures for Lucanus cervus. (PDF)
Data
Lucanus cervus microsatellite data used in the analyses. (XLSX)
Data
Maximum-likelihood phylogeny tree, calculated with RAxML for Lucanus cervus COI data, using L. ibericus as an outgroup species. Only bootstrap values greater than 70% are shown (100 replicates). The scale bar corresponds to the mean number of amino acid substitutions per site on the respective branch. Lineages I and II are indicated with blue and p...
Data
Population pairwise FST values for microsatellite genotypes of Lucanus cervus. Significant values (p < 0.05) are indicated in bold. (PDF)
Data
The final set of occurrence data of Lucanus cervus after thinning indicated with red x’s. The insert shows part of Southern England where grey crosses are occurrence sites before the final thinning step using the nearest neighbour distance of 5 km. (TIF)
Data
Sample information of the collected stag beetles including localities, coordinates, year of collection and accession numbers of the studied COI sequences. (PDF)
Data
Population pairwise FST values for mtDNA dataset of Lucanus cervus. Significant values (p < 0.05) are indicated in bold. (PDF)
Article
Full-text available
Conserving populations of environmentally vulnerable insect species requires a greater understanding of the factors that determine their abundance and distribution, which requires detailed knowledge of their population and community ecology. Chemical ecological tools such as pheromones can be used for non-destructive monitoring of scarab beetle pop...
Data
Coupled GC-EAG traces of five male Gnorimus nobilis antennae from five individuals. The most abundant peak is 2-propyl (E)-3 hexenoate. (TIFF)
Data
Geometry of trans alkene. 1H NMR of natural 2-propyl (E)-3-hexenoate: δH (CD2Cl2, 500 MHz) 5.60 (1H, dt, J = 15.4, 6.1 Hz, H-4), 5.51 (1H, dt, J = 15.4, 6.7 Hz, H-3), 5.00 (1H, septet, J = 6.3 Hz, H-2 propyl), 2.98 (2H, dd, J = 6.7, 0.9 Hz, H-2), 2.04 (2H, m, H-5), 1.24 (6H, d, J = 6.3 Hz, H-1 propyl), 0.99 (3H, t, J = 7.5 Hz, H-6); m/z (EI) 156 (M...
Data
NMR analyses of natural and synthetic 2-propyl (E)-3-hexenoate. (TIFF)
Data
Coupling constants of the olefinic region of the 1H-NMR. (TIFF)
Article
To date, conservation-status saproxylic beetle species in the UK have been monitored by chance findings or by monitor-based observational studies. Here, using Elater ferrugineus as our target species, we present the first national distribution survey carried out in the UK or across mainland Europe on such a species using chemicals produced by the i...
Article
The use of pheromones to determine distributions of rare saproxylic insects is an increasingly popular technique. Pheromones may, however, also be used to elucidate the biology of these cryptic species, a vital requirement if they are to be accurately monitored and conserved. We used non-invasive aerial trapping to compare the effectiveness of chem...
Article
Full-text available
Truffle harvests are declining in Europe, due to droughts, and this offers an opportunity for production to be developed in countries such as the UK and Poland, where rainfall tends to be higher. Drier Medi-terranean summers seem to be associated with a decrease in the harvest of the P erigord truffle (Tuber melanosporum) in Spain, France and Italy...
Article
Developing protocols for threatened invertebrates is often challenging, because they are not only rare but also elusive. This is the case with the stag beetle (Lucanus cervus), a protected and flagship species for the saproxylic beetle fauna in Europe. We applied a standard transect walk at a European scale (8 countries, 29 transects) to test its p...
Article
Full-text available
The taxonomy of stag beetles (Coleoptera: Lucanidae) remains challenging, mainly due to the sexual dimorphism and the strong allometry in males. Such conjecture confounds taxonomic based conservation efforts that are urgently needed due to numerous threats to stag beetle biodiversity. Molecular tools could help solve the problem of identification o...
Article
Full-text available
The taxonomy of stag beetles (coleoptera: Lucanidae) remains challenging, mainly due to the sexual dimorphism and the strong allometry in males. Such conjecture confounds taxonomic based conservation efforts that are urgently needed due to numerous threats to stag beetle biodiversity. Molecular tools could help solve the problem of identification...
Data
Consensus Bayesian tree of 60 haplotypes of the 3’ end of the COI gene. Values given by the nodes are posterior probabilities above 0.70. (doi: 10.3897/zookeys.365.5526.app1) File format: Adobe PDF file (pdf).
Data
Nucleotide diagnostics for (sub)species or species groups according to the Neighbour-Joining and Bayesian Inference tree topology. (doi: 10.3897/zookeys.365.5526.app2) File format: Adobe PDF file (pdf).
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In 2012 the 1st European Stag Beetle Survey was launched. Eight countries have joined the study: Belgium, United Kingdom, Poland, Germany, Spain, Italy, Switzerland, Slovenia. The aims were: 1. To find a method standardization with application at pan-European scale for the monitoring of stag beetles using transects. 2. To obtain information on th...
Article
1. The stag beetle, Lucanus cervus is Nationally Scarce in the UK, yet no methods exist for monitoring the abundance of adults or presence of the subterranean larvae. 2. Here, we describe the design of an aerial flight interception trap that can be used to catch adults. Various lures were tested and ginger root was found to attract both sexes in eq...
Article
Full-text available
1. The European stag beetle, Lucanus cervus, is thought to be widely distributed across its range, but a detailed description of its occurrence is lacking. 2. Researchers in 41 countries were contacted and information sought on various life history characteristics of the insect. Data on adult body size were collected from seven countries. 3. Habita...
Article
Abstract The stag beetle, Lucanus cervus, is Britain’s largest beetle, with a patchy distribution in southern England. The literature suggests that it displays exceptional size variation, particularly in the males, but no analysis of size inequality has ever been conducted. In the present study, stag beetle adults are measured and allometric relati...

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