Debora Obrist

Debora Obrist
Simon Fraser University · Department of Biological Sciences

Bachelor of Science

About

5
Publications
512
Reads
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7
Citations
Introduction
​I am a PhD candidate at Simon Fraser University, working with Dr. John Reynolds. Broadly, I am interested in interactions between ecosystems - namely, how subsidies from a donor ecosystem can affect the biota in a recipient habitat. My PhD work focuses on how subsidies from the ocean in the forms of beach-cast seaweeds, river otter feces and food scraps, and sea spray, can affect plants, bugs, and birds on 100 small islands on the central coast of British Columbia, Canada.
Additional affiliations
September 2016 - present
Simon Fraser University
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
September 2012 - May 2015
University of Victoria
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (5)
Article
Full-text available
Although marine subsidies often enrich terrestrial ecosystems, their influence is known to be context-dependent. Additionally, the multitrophic impact of marine subsidies has not been traced through food webs across physically diverse islands. Here, we test predictions about how island characteristics can affect marine enrichment of food web consti...
Article
Full-text available
Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) carcasses can fertilize riparian forests with marine-derived nutrients when populations make their annual return to natal streams to spawn; however, the strength of this cross-system linkage likely varies substantially among years due to the interannual fluctuations in abundance that characterize most salmon popul...
Article
Full-text available
Since the United States enacted its first species-at-risk legislation in 1966, many jurisdictions have similarly adopted legislation aimed at conserving biodiversity through the identification of species at risk of extinction, the protection of these species from harm, and the establishment of recovery programs (Ray and Ginsberg 1999; Waples et al....
Article
Full-text available
Annual spawning migrations by Pacific salmon can provide substantial subsidies to nutrient‐limited freshwater and riparian ecosystems, which can affect the abundance, diversity, and physical characteristics of plant and animal species in these habitats. Here, we provide the first investigation of how salmon subsidies affect reproductive output in p...
Article
Full-text available
The classical theory of island biogeography, which predicts species richness using island area and isolation, has been expanded to include contributions from marine subsidies, i.e. subsidized island biogeography (SIB) theory. We tested the effects of marine subsidies on species diversity and population density on productive temperate islands, evalu...

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