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Débora Lina Moreno Azócar

Débora Lina Moreno Azócar
INIBIOMA · Laboratorio de Ecología, Biología Evolutiva y Comportamiento de Herpetozoos (LEBECH, http://www.lebechlab.wordpress.com/)

Doctora en Biología

About

19
Publications
6,353
Reads
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423
Citations
Citations since 2016
9 Research Items
310 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220204060
Introduction
I started working with lizards during my degree thesis, and discovered I like them as a study organism, mainly because all the adaptations they present, they are able to inhabit in several differernt habitats, from the warmest deserts to cold high latitudes. My research is focused now in some characteristics that may be benefical (or not?) for thermal biology issues, and for inhabiting in harsh environments. I enjoy both fieldwork as well as lab stuff.
Additional affiliations
October 2015 - September 2017
National University of Comahue
Position
  • Researcher
Education
April 2008 - March 2013
National University of Comahue
Field of study
  • Biology
March 2001 - March 2008
National University of San Juan
Field of study
  • Biology
March 2001 - August 2005
National University of San Juan
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Evolutionary transitions in life‐history strategies, such as the shift from egg‐laying to live birth (viviparity) are of great interest to evolutionary biologists. In squamate reptiles, several hypotheses have been proposed to explain viviparity including the cold climate hypothesis, maternal manipulation hypothesis, hypoxia hypothesis, and several...
Article
Phenotypic variation is the result of selection on traits that are relevant in a given ecological context. Phylogenetic history, genetic drift, and any developmental or structural constraints may, however, limit variation in trait expression. It has been proposed that organismal performance traits take up a pivotal role in driving variation in morp...
Article
Body temperature affects various aspects of ectotherm biology. Reptiles, as ectotherms, gain and control their temperature mainly through behavioural adjustments, although some body traits may also be advantageous. According to the thermal melanism hypothesis (TMH) dark colour may be thermally advantageous in cold environments. Additionally, differ...
Article
In living organisms with sexual reproduction, the presence of sexual size dimorphism (SSD) is common. The main explanations for this phenomenon are based on sexual selection or the fecundity advantage hypothesis (natural selection). Here, we tested Rensch's rule in species of the viviparous lizard genus Phymaturus; additionally, we tested if there...
Article
Full-text available
The interaction between organisms and their environment is central in functional morphology. Differences in habitat usage may imply divergent morphology of locomotor systems; thus, detecting which morphological traits are conservative across lineages and which ones vary under environmental pressure is important in evolutionary studies. We studied i...
Article
The genus Phymaturus comprises lizards that inhabit cold environments at high altitudes or latitudes. Phymaturus verdugo Cei and Videla, 2003 is characterized by cephalic melanism, which is interpreted as a character present only in males and associated with sexual dimorphism. Using spectrophotometry and photography, we demonstrate that this specie...
Article
Full-text available
Animal habitat-use patterns cannot be isolated from scale issues. Consequently, multi-scale studies provide a complete characterization of ecological patterns that can further explain the observed variation. Liolaemus constitutes the world’s second most speciose lizard genus. In this study, we assessed the relationships between home range size and...
Article
Full-text available
Most studies of predator-induced plasticity have focused on documenting how prey species respond to predators by modifying phenotypic traits and how traits correlate with fitness. We have previously shown that Pleurodema thaul tadpoles exposed to the dragonfly Rhionaeschna variegata responded strongly by showing morphological changes, less activity...
Article
Full-text available
Body temperature of ectotherms depends on the environmental temperatures and behavioral adjustments, but morphology may also affect it. For example, in colder environments animals tend to be larger and show higher thermal inertia, as proposed by Bergmann's rule and the heat balance hypothesis (HBH). Additionally, dark coloration increases solar rad...
Article
Full-text available
Global climate change affects the distributions of ectotherms and may be the cause of several conservation problems, such as great displacement of climatic suitable spaces for species and, consequently, important reductions of the extent of liveable places, threatening the existence of many of them. Species exposure (and hence vulnerability) to glo...
Article
Body size (BS) varies in response to several selective pressures. In ectotherms, thermal inertia may affect thermoregulation, since larger BSs increase heat conservation as Bergmann originally stipulated for endotherms. However, Bergmann's rule is controversial in ectotherms. The heat balance hypothesis states that ectotherms' thermoregulatory capa...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Ectothermic organisms strongly depend on temperature, making them an excellent model to study the impact of global climatic change (GCC). Under global warming, species may be forced to move toward colder environments, such as higher latitudes, higher elevations or both. However, several studies show that responses may vary significantly in...
Article
Full-text available
La distribución de los reptiles, dada su dependencia de la temperatura, puede verse restringida en función del clima. En particular, se han planteado tres hipótesis que vinculan el clima con la distribución y el viviparismo en las especies de reptiles: i) hipótesis de clima variable, ii) hipótesis del clima frío e iii) hipótesis de manipulación mat...
Article
Full-text available
The importance of the thermal environment for ectotherms and its relationship with thermal physiology and ecology is widely recognized. Several models have been proposed to explain the evolution of the thermal biology of ectotherms, but experimental studies have providedmixed support. Lizards fromthe Liolaemus goetschi group can be found along a wi...
Article
Full-text available
The genus Liolaemus is a group of lizards with more than 230 recognized species, which have been grouped in different clades and subgroups. One of the monophyletic groups is the one of Liolaemus boulengeri or “the patch group”; this clade itself is integrated by several monophyletic groups: the groups Liolaemus anomalus, Liolaemus wiegmanii, Liolae...
Article
Full-text available
The integration or coadaptation of morphological, physiological, and behavioral traits is represented by whole-organism performance traits such as locomotion or bite force. Additionally, maximum sprint speed is a good indicator of whole-organism performance capacity as variation in sprinting ability can affect survival. We studied thermal biology,...
Article
Full-text available
We describe the diet of a Liolaemus cuyanus population from the Monte of San Juan Province in Argentina. Diet composition, trophic niche breadth, age, sexual, and seasonal variation were analyzed. In addition, we investigated the relationship between L. cuyanus morphology and size of prey consumed. From the stomach contents of 105 lizards, we found...
Article
Full-text available
Although differential selective pressures on males and females of the same species may result in sex-specific evolutionary trajectories, comparative studies of adaptive radiations have largely neglected within-species variation. In this study, we explore the potential effects of natural selection, sexual selection, or a combination of both, on bite...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Investigaciones relacionadas a aspectos ecológicos en la familia Liolaemidae. Principalmente ecología térmica, reproductiva y trófica.