Dean Sully

Dean Sully
University College London | UCL · Institute of Archaeology

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24
Publications
1,268
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113
Citations

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines the conservation treatment of a lacquered Buddha sculpture undertaken by a Buddhist conservator as part of a postgraduate heritage conservation training programme in London. This creative process selects from a mixture of ideas and practices as a specific response to the people, time, and place of the conservation treatment. Rat...
Article
Full-text available
Values-based conservation is an increasingly dominant theme in heritage conservation theory. It is less routine in the application of object conservation practice, where emphasis on the physical fabric of heritage prevails. Materials-based approaches pivot conservation decisions on assessments of object condition. Values-based approaches posit that...
Conference Paper
The conservation of a Chinese Buddha sculpture, carved wood with a lacquered surface, was undertaken during conservation training at UCL Institute of Archaeology, London, UK. The sculpture was consolidated the loosened lacquer surface with 10 % Paraloid® B-72 (ethyl methacrylate copolymer) in xylene by utilising the shimbari consolidation method. T...
Article
Full-text available
The care of taonga (Maori treasures) outside the Maori community takes place within varying degrees of inter-cultural engagement, in which encounters with the past can be seen to be negotiated through the changing nature of personal and institutional relationships in the present. The desire to develop Hinemihi, the historic Maori meeting house at C...
Article
This study describes the analysis of paint samples from carvings belonging to Hinemihi, the Maori meeting house, Clandon Park, Surrey, UK. The assessment of physical evidence contained within Hinemihi's built fabric (along with historiographic research of archival sources and oral histories) has formed a key part of the information gathering proces...
Article
Book description: This book argues for an important shift in cultural heritage conservation, away from a focus on maintaining the physical fabric of material culture toward the impact that conservation work has on people’s lives. It challenges the commodification of sacred objects and places by western conservation thought and attempts to decoloniz...
Article
This paper explores various recent changes to the heritage context in which conservators now work, including changes to the accepted composition of the heritage, the inclusion of wider audiences, the understanding of wider, often intangible, meanings of objects, and the development of conservation as a social practice. Other factors such as funding...
Article
This study concerns a group of objects excavated in First World War trenches in France and Belgium and brought for conservation to the Institute of Archaeology, University College London. These objects were associated with unidentified human remains thought to be of soldiers killed in battles between 1914 and 1918. The contribution of the Institute...
Article
Since the Institute of Archaeology was founded in the 1930s, conservation has been an integral part of its activities, but it is now being practised and taught in new, more culturally responsive ways. An example of this approach is the involvement of staff and students in the conservation of a Maori meeting house at Clandon Park, Surrey, made possi...
Article
Full-text available
Since the Institute of Archaeology was founded in the 1930s, conservation has been an integral part of its activities, but it is now being practised and taught in new, more culturally responsive ways. An example of this approach is the involvement of staff and students in the conservation of a Maori meeting house at Clandon Park, Surrey, made possi...
Article
There is a missing link in the strategic introduction of new materials in conservation, which lies between the identification of new processes/materials and their widespread use in conservation treatments. Clinical trials to monitor the results of treatment success provide an effective procedure to evaluate the conservation process. This is now pos...
Article
At the Museum of London, a number of permanent galleries have recently been refurbished mainly with cases that have been designed and constructed in‐house (by museum staff or contractors) rather than buying from specialist museum showcase manufacturers. This initiated a programme of testing construction materials, investigating recommended methods...
Article
The conservation of an important group of waterlogged neolithic birch-bark bowls has been completed. The extreme fragility, complex shape and rarity of these objects meant that novel techniques had to be adopted to achieve a successful treatment. Mould-making techniques were adapted to provide close-fitting supports, so that the structural integrit...
Article
A condition survey of leather from the Museum of London's archaeological archive was used to evaluate the success of treating waterlogged leather with glycerol (propane-l,2,3-triol) followed by freeze-drying. A standard collections management survey form was adapted with additional condition information specific to leather. A condition score was ca...
Article
This paper deals with the approach to the conservation of a Spanish-style saddle and anquera (rump cover) from Mexico City and Puebla, Mexico, respectively. The objects were originally bought by an English explorer for a journey and are described in his book. The saddle and anquera are made from vegetable-tanned cowhide with punched and embroidered...
Article
This paper deals with the approach to the conservation of a Spanish-style saddle and anquera (rump cover) from Mexico City and Puebla, Mexico, respectively. The objects were originally bought by an English explorer for a journey and are described in his book. The saddle and anquera are made from vegetable-tanned cowhide with punched and embroidered...

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