Dawn M Behne

Dawn M Behne
Norwegian University of Science and Technology | NTNU · Department of Psychology

About

76
Publications
6,617
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558
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August 2003 - present
Norwegian University of Technology- and Science

Publications

Publications (76)
Article
Full-text available
This study investigates effects of spatial auditory cues on human listeners' response strategy for identifying two alternately active talkers (“turn-taking” listening scenario). Previous research has demonstrated subjective benefits of audio spatialization with regard to speech intelligibility and talker-identification effort. So far, the deliberat...
Article
Full-text available
Previous research with speech and non-speech stimuli suggested that in audiovisual perception, visual information starting prior to the onset of corresponding sound can provide visual cues, and form a prediction about the upcoming auditory sound. This prediction leads to audiovisual (AV) interaction. Auditory and visual perception interact and indu...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: Degradations of transmitted speech have been shown to affect perceptual and cognitive processing in human listeners, as indicated by the P3 component of the event-related brain potential (ERP). However, research suggests that previously observed P3 modulations might actually be traced back to earlier neural modulations in the time range...
Article
Full-text available
In audiovisual music perception, visual information from a musical instrument being played is available prior to the onset of the corresponding musical sound and consequently allows a perceiver to form a prediction about the upcoming audio music. This prediction in audiovisual music perception, compared to auditory music perception, leads to lower...
Article
Full-text available
Infant perception often deals with audiovisual speech input and a first step in processing this input is to perceive both visual and auditory information. The speech directed to infants has special characteristics and may enhance visual aspects of speech. The current study was designed to explore the impact of visual enhancement in infant‐directed...
Article
Full-text available
In audiovisual speech perception, visual information from a talker's face during mouth articulation is available before the onset of the corresponding audio speech, and thereby allows the perceiver to use visual information to predict the upcoming audio. This prediction from phonetically congruent visual information modulates audiovisual speech per...
Article
The temporal alignment of what we hear and see is fundamental for the cognitive organization of information from our environment. Research indicates that a perceiver's experience influences sensitivity to audio-visual (AV) synchrony. We theorize that experience that enhances sensitivity to speech sound distinctions in the temporal domain would enha...
Article
Full-text available
The present study investigates the formation of new word-referent associations in an implicit learning scenario, using a gender-coded artificial language with spoken words and visual referents. Previous research has shown that when participants are explicitly instructed about the gender-coding system underlying an artificial lexicon, they monitor t...
Article
Full-text available
As research on the construction of a mental representation of referent gender in speech comprehension is scarce, this study examined whether factors identified in reading comprehension exert similar influence in speech comprehension. Conceptually replicating previous research, a sentence continuation evaluation task was set up in two modalities, as...
Article
Full-text available
The current study combines artificial language learning with visual world eyetracking to investigate acquisition of representations associating spoken words and visual referents using morphologically complex pseudowords. Pseudowords were constructed to consistently encode referential gender by means of suffixation for a set of imaginary figures tha...
Article
Gender and age have been found to affect adults' audiovisual (AV) speech perception. However, research on adult aging focuses on adults over 60 years, who have an increasing likelihood for cognitive and sensory decline, which may confound positive effects of age-related AV-experience and its interaction with gender. Observed age and gender differen...
Article
Full-text available
In well-controlled laboratory experiments, researchers have found that humans can perceive delays between auditory and visual signals as short as 20 ms. Conversely, other experiments have shown that humans can tolerate audiovisual asynchrony that exceeds 200 ms. This seeming contradiction in human temporal sensitivity can be attributed to a number...
Article
Cognitive processing speed, hearing acuity, and audio-visual (AV) experience have been suggested to influence AV asynchrony detection. Whereas the influence of hearing acuity and AV experience have been explored to some extent, the influence of cognitive processing speed on perceived AV asynchrony has not been directly tested. Therefore, the curren...
Article
Full-text available
With teleconferencing becoming more accessible as a communication platform, researchers are working to understand the consequences of the interaction between human perception and this unfamiliar environment. Given the enclosed space of a teleconference room, along with the physical separation between the user, microphone and speakers, the transmitt...
Article
Full-text available
Rules-of-thumb for noticeable and detrimental asynchrony between audio and video streams have long since been established from the contributions of several studies. Although these studies share similar findings, none have made any discernible assumptions regarding audio and video quality. Considering the use of active adaptation in present and upco...
Article
Previous research indicates that perception of audio-visual (AV) synchrony changes in adulthood. Possible explanations for these age differences include a decline in hearing acuity, a decline in cognitive processing speed, and increased experience with AV binding. The current study aims to isolate the effect of AV experience by comparing synchrony...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The difficulty in detecting short asynchronies between corresponding audio and video signals demonstrates the remarkable resilience of the perceptual system when integrating the senses. Thresholds for perceived synchrony vary depending on the complexity, congruency and predictability of the audiovisual event. For instance, asynchrony is typically d...
Article
Perception of audiovisual synchrony relies on matching temporal attributes across sensory modalities. To investigate the influence of experience on cross-modal temporal integration, the effect of musical experience on the perception of audiovisual synchrony was studied with speech and music stimuli. Nine musicians and nine non-musicians meeting str...
Conference Paper
Perceived synchrony varies depending on the audiovisual event. Typically, asynchrony is tolerated at greater lead- and lag-times for speech and music than for action events. The tolerance for asynchrony in speech has been attributed to the unity assumption, which proposes a bonding of auditory and visual speech cues through associations in several...
Article
Research shows that noise and phonetic attributes influence the degree to which auditory and visual modalities are used in audio-visual speech perception (AVSP). Research has, however, mainly focused on white noise and single phonetic attributes, thus neglecting the more common babble noise and possible interactions between phonetic attributes. Thi...
Article
This study examines how native language (L1) experience affects auditory–visual (AV) perception of nonnative (L2) speech. Korean, Mandarin and English perceivers were presented with English CV syllables containing fricatives with three places of articulation: labiodentals nonexistent in Korean, interdentals nonexistent in Korean and Mandarin, and a...
Article
This study examined the effects of linguistic experience on audio-visual (AV) perception of non-native (L2) speech. Canadian English natives and Mandarin Chinese natives differing in degree of English exposure [long and short length of residence (LOR) in Canada] were presented with English fricatives of three visually distinct places of articulatio...
Conference Paper
Previous research has shown that voicing can influence the perception of consonant place of articulation (POA) in audiovisual (AV) speech perception, although findings are inconsistent and often differ with the use of background noise. The prediction in the current study was that the AV perception of voiced and voiceless stop consonant POA is influ...
Article
This study examines the effects of auditory (A), visual (V), and audio-visual (AV) training on nonnative speech perception. Mandarin Chinese natives were trained to perceive English voiceless fricatives (in monosyllabic words and nonwords) of three visually distinct places of articulation: interdentals nonexistent in Mandarin, labiodentals and alve...
Article
Previous research shows that white noise influences the degree auditory and visual modalities are used in audio-visual (AV) speech perception. This study assesses identification of voicing and place of articulation (POA) in the infrequently studied natural babble noise. Incongruent monosyllabic AV stimuli were presented to 15 young adults in white...
Article
Previous research shows that for native perceivers, visual information enhances speech perception, especially when auditory distinctiveness decreases. This study examines how linguistic experience affects audio‐visual (AV) perception of non‐native (L2) speech. Native Canadian English perceivers and Mandarin perceivers with two levels of English exp...
Article
Research continues to address the extent to which music ability transfers to other tasks and processes, among them speech perception. The current study examines the transfer of music experience to native and non‐native linguistic pitch perception and tracks this process during training. Participants were nonmusicians (NMs) and music conservatory st...
Article
Speech prosody and music share tonal attributes well suited for studying cross‐domain transfer effects. The present study investigates whether the specific pitch experience acquired by professional singers and instrumentalists transfers to the perception of corresponding prosodic elements in a native and non‐native language. Norwegian and Mandarin...
Article
Research has shown that voicing is difficult to discern in noisy environments. While voicing may be difficult to resolve from visual cues, acoustic cues for voicing are relatively robust. This study addresses these factors with normally aging audiovisual perception. Identification responses were gathered with 19–30‐year‐old and 49–60‐year‐old adult...
Article
Full-text available
The Mother–Infant Phonetic Interaction model (MIPhI) predicts that, compared with adult directed speech (ADS), in infant directed speech (IDS) vowels will be overspecified and consonants underspecified during the infants' first 6 months. In a longitudinal natural study, six mothers' ADS and IDS were recorded on 10 occasions during the first 6 month...
Conference Paper
This study investigated whether the steady-state suppression method proposed by Arai et al. (2001, 2002) improved consonant identification for nonnative listeners in reverberation. It also compared the effect of steady-state suppression on consonant identification by native and nonnative listeners in reverberation. We used steady-state suppression...
Conference Paper
This study examines audio-visual perception of second-language (L2) speech, with the goal of investigating the extent to which the auditory and visual input modalities are integrated in processing unfamiliar L2 speech. Native (Canadian English) and nonnative (Mandarin) perceivers responses were collected for a set of fricative-initial syllables pre...
Article
Full-text available
An interactive face-to-face setting is used to study natural infant directed speech (IDS) compared to adult directed speech (ADS). With distinctive vowel quantity and vowel quality, Norwegian IDS was used in a natural quasi-experimental design. Six Norwegian mothers were recorded over a period of 6 months alone with their infants and in an adult co...
Article
Native Mandarin Chinese speakers productions of English consonant-vowel (CV) syllables have shown syllable-internal temporal adjustments in the direction of native (English)-like CVs (Wang and Behne, 2004). The current study presents two experiments investigating whether these temporal adjustments affect perceived nativeness. For three production t...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigated hemispheric lateralization of Mandarin tone. Four groups of listeners were examined: native Mandarin listeners, English–Mandarin bilinguals, Norwegian listeners with experience with Norwegian tone, and American listeners with no tone experience. Tone pairs were dichotically presented and listeners identified which tone they...
Conference Paper
Vowel duration and local fundamental frequency changes are investigated as acoustical cues to vowel quantity identification by Japanese listeners. To examine the role of these factors, a perception experiment was carried out. The results indicate that, even though vowel duration serves as a dominant perceptual cue, when vowel quantity cannot be ade...
Article
1996) shows that adult listeners also make use of vowel spectra to identify /a:/ and /a/. If vowel duration is a primary cue, the use of the vowel spectrum in special cases may be seen as perceptual fine-tuning to improve the efficiency of processing vowel quantities. In that case we would expect young children to develop the use of vowel duration...
Article
Research on the perception of Swedish vowel quantity by adult native listeners shows that vowel duration is a primary cue for identifying vowel quantity. However, when a vowel has a relatively long duration (e.g., due to its inherent duration, or its context), adult listeners may make use of both duration and spectra to identify vowel quantity. Use...
Article
Second language (L2) production can be a kind of interlanguage, a relatively stable system bearing the nature of both the native language (L1) and L2. Within such a system sound components of a syllable may bear their own interlanguage characteristics and yet interact with the other component sounds. The present study investigates temporal patterns...
Conference Paper
Research on the perception of Swedish vowel quantity suggests that when the duration of a vowel is relatively long, due for example to inherent duration or postvocalic voicng, vowel quantity might not be adequately cued by duration alone and might also make use of the vowel spectra to distinguish vowel quantities. The current project investigates w...
Article
In many languages, vowels are characterized by their use of contrastive phonological vowel quantity and vowel quality. In Swedish, vowels have traditionally been described as being distinct in quality as well as having a phonological distinction between short and long vowel quantities. In English, however, phonological distinctions among vowels are...
Article
Swedish is described as having a distinction between phonologically long and short vowels. This distinction is realized primarily through the duration of the vowels, but in some cases also through resonance characteristics of the vowels. In Swedish, like many languages, vowel duration is also longer preceding a voiced postvocalic consonant than a v...
Article
This project re-examines the perceptual weight of vowel duration and the first two vowel formant frequencies in distinguishing phonologically short and long vowels in Swedish. Based on listeners' responses to synthesized sets of materials for [I]-[i],[O]-[o]and [a]-[A],
Article
In Norwegian and English, as in many languages, vowels can be characterized in terms of distinctive phonological vowel quantity and vowel quality. Norwegian is described as having phonological distinction between long and short vowels, whereas in English vowel quality is generally seen as more distinct. However, both vowel quantity and quality can...
Article
Abstract The phonological notions of vowel quantity and vowel quality are acoustically realized in the duration and spectral characteristics of a vowel. This study examines acoustic attributes of six Norwegian vowe0, 0:, A, k/ and addresses the extent to which vowel quantity and quality each affect vowel dura- tion and thefirst two formant frequenc...
Article
Syllable‐internal timing can be affected by a variety of factors, including postvocalic voicing and distinctive vowel length. Both factors have been found to inversely affect vowel duration and the duration of a postvocalic consonant, resulting in similar rhyme‐internal timing patterns. Is there any indication that syllable‐internal timing uniquely...
Article
In Swedish a postvocalic consonant is phonologically long following a distinctively short vowel and phonologically short following a distinctively long vowel. Previous research has demonstrated that this distinction is reflected in the relative durations of the corresponding segments. In addition, it has been shown that a consonant tends to be shor...
Article
A tool is described for coordinating cross-language research and education in acoustic phonetics and speech perception. This will be demonstrated in the Special Session on Education in Acoustics at ICA 2004.
Article
This study investigated whether the steady-state suppression proposed by Arai et al. (Proc. Autumn Meet. Acoust. Soc. Jpn., 2001; Acoust. Sci. Tech., 2002) improved consonant identification for non-native listeners in reverberation. This study also compared the effect of steady-state suppression on consonant identification by native and non-native...
Article
Some differences in speech perception by native and non-native listeners can be accounted for as transference from a native language. Other differences appear to result from universal preferences. Bohn (1995) argues, more specifically, that non-native perceivers will prefer using some acoustic cues (e.g., duration), independent of whether they are...
Article
A distinction in vowel quantity is typically realized acoustically by vowel duration. Research on the perception of Swedish vowel quantity supports this and further suggests that when the duration of a vowel is relatively long (due, e.g., to inherent duration), vowel quantity may not be adequately cued by duration alone and may also make use of the...
Article
Previous research has not determined whether the inclusion of lexical semantic information facilitates or inhibits the learning of second language (L2) phonetic contrasts. The present study addresses this issue by comparing the acquisition of Mandarin Chinese tones with and without semantic contexts. Two groups of native English listeners with no l...

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Project (1)
Project
This project aims to strengthen our understanding of spoken and written language comprehension across languages that markedly differ in the extent to which speakers take grammatical and/or physical gender into account.