Davide Filingeri

Davide Filingeri
University of Southampton · Faculty of Health Sciences

BSc, MSc, PhD

About

89
Publications
35,732
Reads
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930
Citations
Introduction
Investigating human thermosensation, hygrosensation and thermoregulation in healthy and clinical populations. Research interests cover the fields of environmental physiology and sensory neuroscience.
Additional affiliations
March 2021 - present
University of Southampton
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
October 2016 - February 2021
Loughborough University
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • My role involves teaching, research, enterprise, and supervision of postgraduate students.
November 2015 - present
University of California, Berkeley
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Project funded by US Department of Energy. Investigating the physiological bases of temperature sensation across the human body as well as efficient conductive heat transfer mechanisms to and from the human body
Education
December 2011 - December 2014
Loughborough University
Field of study
  • Environmental Physiology and Sensory Neuroscience
October 2009 - July 2011
Università degli Studi di Palermo (in collaboration with University of Greenwich, UK)
Field of study
  • Exercise Physiology
September 2005 - October 2009
Università degli Studi di Palermo
Field of study
  • Human Movement and Sport Science

Publications

Publications (89)
Article
Full-text available
Mechanosensory inputs arising from dynamic interactions between the skin and moisture, such as when sliding a finger over a wet substrate, contribute to the perception of skin wetness. Yet, the exact relationship between the mechanical properties of a wet substrate, such as friction, and the resulting wetness perception, remains to be established u...
Article
New findings: What is the central question of this study? Ageing impairs the skin's thermal and tactile sensitivity: does ageing also induce loss of skin wetness sensitivity? What is the main finding and its importance? Older adults show an average 15% loss of skin wetness sensitivity, with this sensory deficit being mediated by a combination of r...
Article
Background: A noticeable but unknown proportion of people with multiple sclerosis (pwMS) report the sudden experience of wetness on a dry skin site, i.e., phantom wetness. Yet, we lack patient-centred investigations on the prevalence and subjective experience of this uncomfortable symptom. Objectives: To assess the prevalence of phantom wetness in...
Article
Full-text available
Undoubtedly, adjusting our thermoregulatory behavior represents the most effective mechanism to maintain thermal homeostasis and ensure survival in the diverse thermal environments that we face on this planet. Remarkably, our thermal behavior is entirely dependent on the ability to detect variations in our internal (i.e., body) and external environ...
Article
Full-text available
Although the ability to sense skin wetness and humidity is critical for behavioral and autonomic adaptations, humans are not provided with specific skin receptors for sensing wetness. It has been proposed that we "learn" to perceive the wetness experienced when the skin is in contact with a wet surface or when sweat is produced through a multisenso...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate skin wetness perception and thermal sensitivity in people with migraine and similar healthy controls. Background: Environmental triggers, such as cold and humidity, are known triggers for pain in people with migraine. Sensory inputs might be implicated in such heightened responses to cold-hu...
Preprint
The study of the human ability to both detect the presence and estimate the amount of wetness on the skin has grown in scientific interest over the last century, due the implication of wetness in comfort and skin health. In 1900, Bentley demonstrated that skin wetness is detected based on touch and temperature stimuli combining to produce sensation...
Article
Humans often experience wet stimuli using their hands, yet we know little on how sensitive our fingers are to wetness and the mechanisms underlying this sensory function. We therefore aimed to quantify the minimum amount of water required to detect wetness on the human index fingerpad, the wetness detection threshold, and assess its modulation by t...
Article
Purpose: To determine whether thermoregulatory capacity is altered by MS during exercise in the heat. Methods: Sixteen MS (EDSS: 2.9±0.9; 47±8 y; 77.6±14.0 kg) and 14 healthy (CON) control participants (43±11 y; 78.6±17.0 kg) cycled at a heat production of 4 W.kg-1 for 60 minutes at 30˚C, 30%RH (WARM). A subset of 8 MS (EDSS: 2.6±0.5; 44±8 y; 82...
Article
COVID-19 may increase the risk of heat-related symptoms during hot weather since vulnerable populations, including the elderly and those with neurological disabilities, must continue to self-isolate, often indoors. Within the chronic neurological patient population, indoor conditions in summer months present a hazard because of impaired and/or alte...
Article
Full-text available
Many occupations and sports require high levels of manual dexterity under thermal stress and mental fatigue. Yet, multi-stressor studies remain scarce. We quantified the interactive effects of thermal stress and mental fatigue on manual dexterity. Seven males (21.1±1.3y) underwent 6 separate 60-min trials characterised by a combination of 3 air tem...
Article
We investigated whether and how multiple sclerosis (MS) alters thresholds for perceiving increases and decreases in local skin temperature, as well as the sensitivity to progressively greater temperature stimuli, amongst heat-sensitive people with MS. Eleven MS patients (5 M/6 F; 51.1 ± 8.6 y, EDSS 5.7 ± 1.9) and 11 healthy controls (CTR; 7 M/4 F;...
Article
Full-text available
Carrying babies in a sling, that is, babywearing, is a popular practice among new parents. Babies are thermally vulnerable and public health bodies advise to dress them in one extra layer than the adult. However, these guidelines do not consider babywearing and it is unclear whether babies’ clothing insulation should be modified during babywearing....
Article
Full-text available
In contrast with other species, humans are believed to lack hygroreceptors for sensing skin wetness. Yet, the molecular basis of human hygrosensation are currently unknown and it remains unclear whether we possess a receptor-mediated sensing mechanism for skin wetness. The aim of this study was to assess the role of the cutaneous cold-sensitive Tra...
Article
'Personal comfort systems' and thermally active clothing are able to warm and cool individual building occupants by transferring heat directly to and from their body surfaces. Such systems would ideally target local body surfaces with high-temperature sensitivities. Such sensitivities have not been quantified in detail before. Here we report local...
Article
Hygroreceptors are a type of humidity sensor that have been identified in several invertebrate classes including Insecta and Arachnida. While their structure has been well researched, the nature of the mechanisms behind their function is debated as being either mechanical, evaporative, or psychrometric in insects and potentially also olfactory in a...
Article
Humans lack skin hygroreceptors and we rely on integrating cold and tactile inputs from A‐type skin nerve fibres to sense wetness. Yet, it is unknown whether sex and exercise independently modulate skin wetness sensitivity across the body. We mapped local sensitivity to cold, neutral and warm wetness of the forehead, neck, underarm, lower back and...
Article
Full-text available
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune neurodegenerative disease characterized by demyelination of the central nervous system (CNS). The exact cause of MS is still unknown; yet its incidence and prevalence rates are growing worldwide, making MS a significant public health challenge. The heterogeneous distribution of demyelination within and betwe...
Article
The ability of hands and feet to convey skin thermal sensations is an important contributor to our experience of the surrounding world. Surprisingly, the detailed topographical distribution of warm and cold thermosensitivity across hands and feet has not been mapped, although sensitivity maps exist for touch and pain. Using a recently developed qua...
Chapter
Evolutionarily, our ability to sense skin wetness and humidity (i.e., hygroreception) could have developed as a way of helping to maintain thermal homeostasis, as much as it is the case for the role of temperature sensation and thermoreception. Humans are not provided with a specific skin hygroreceptor, and recent studies have indicated that skin w...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: Heat intolerance commonly affects the exercise capacity of people with multiple sclerosis (MS) during bouts of hot weather. Cold-water ingestion is a simple cooling strategy but its efficacy for prolonging exercise capacity with MS remains undetermined. We sought to identify whether cold-water ingestion blunts exercise-induced rises in bo...
Article
New Findings What is the central question of this study? Between 60 and 80% of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients experience transient worsening of symptoms with increased body temperature (heat sensitivity). As sensory abnormalities are common in MS, we asked whether afferent thermosensory function is altered in MS following exercise‐induced increa...
Chapter
The ability to perceive skin wetness represents one of the numerous somatosensory features of the skin. Although the ability to sense skin wetness and humidity is critical for behavioral and autonomic adaptations, humans are not provided with specific skin receptors for sensing wetness. Hence, the ability to sense skin wetness has been suggested to...
Article
Skin temperature detection thresholds have been used to measure human cold and warm sensitivity across the temperature continuum. They exhibit a sensory zone within which neither warm nor cold sensations prevail. This zone has been widely assumed to coincide with steady-state local skin temperatures between 32-34ᵒC, but its underlying neurophysiolo...
Article
Full-text available
Our perception of skin wetness is generated readily, yet humans have no known receptor (hygroreceptor) to signal this directly. It is easy to imagine the sensation of water running over our hands, or the feel of rain on our skin. The synthetic sensation of wetness is thought to be produced from a combination of specific skin thermal and tactile inp...
Article
Full-text available
While inhibitory/facilitatory central modulation of vision and pain has been investigated, contextual modulation of skin temperature integration has been unexplored. Hence, we tested whether progressive decreases in whole-body mean skin temperature (Tsk ) (a large conditioning stimulus) alter the magnitude estimation of local warming and cooling st...
Article
Full-text available
Key points: Visceral thermoreceptors that modify thermoregulatory responses are widely accepted in animal but not human thermoregulation models. Recently, we have provided evidence of viscerally-mediated sweating alterations in humans during exercise brought about by warm and cool fluid ingestion. In the present study, we characterize the modifica...
Article
Deletions in the gene encoding signal-transducing inositol phospholipid-specific phospholipase C-γ2 (PLCγ2) are associated with the novel human hereditary disease PLAID (PLCγ2-associated antibody deficiency and immune dysregulation). PLAID is characterized by a rather puzzling concurrence of augmented and diminished functions of the immune system,...
Chapter
The ability to perceive skin wetness represents one of the numerous somatosensory features of the skin. Although the ability to sense skin wetness and humidity is critical for behavioral and autonomic adaptations, humans are not provided with specific skin receptors for sensing wetness. Hence, the ability to sense skin wetness has been suggested to...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: Passive muscle heating has been shown to reduce the drop in post-warm-up muscle temperature (T m) by about 25 % over 30 min, with concomitant sprint/power performance improvements. We sought to determine the role of leg blood flow in this cooling and whether optimising the heating procedure would further benefit post-warm-up T m maintenan...
Chapter
Full-text available
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Article
We sought to determine i) the influence of adiposity on thermoregulatory responses independently of the confounding biophysical factors of body mass and metabolic heat production (Hprod); and ii) whether differences in adiposity should be accounted for by prescribing an exercise intensity eliciting a fixed Hprod per kg of lean body mass (LBM). Nine...
Article
Full-text available
Seemingly effortless interactions between our physiological systems allow for our remarkable ability to constantly adapt to the changing forces and environments to which we are exposed. Hence, it is no surprise that the study of human physiology requires integrative approaches to understand interactions in physiological function in health and disea...
Conference Paper
Although the ability to sense skin wetness and humidity is critical for behavioural and autonomic adaptations, humans are not provided with specific skin receptors for sensing wetness [1]. We have recently demonstrated that humans perceive the wetness experienced when the skin is in contact with a wet surface through a multisensory integration of t...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Activities that are highly dependent on power output can benefit from increases in muscle temperature (Tm) in terms of work done and skeletal muscle power output. When athletes experience a significant delay between active warm up and performance, Tm declines. Previous studies have demonstrated that using heated trousers during a period of inactivi...
Article
We investigated the effects of mild evaporative cooling applied to the torso, before or during running in the heat. Nine male participants performed three trials: control-no cooling (CTR), pre-exercise cooling (PRE-COOL), and during-exercise cooling (COOL). Trials consisted of 10-min neutral exposure and 50-min heat exposure (30 °C; 44% humidity),...
Article
Full-text available
Humans sense the wetness of a wet surface though the somatosensory integration of thermal and tactile inputs generated by the interaction between skin and moisture. However, little is known on how wetness is sensed when moisture is produced via sweating. We tested the hypothesis that, in the absence of skin cooling, intermittent tactile cues, as co...
Article
Full-text available
The ability to perceive thermal changes in the surrounding environment is critical for survival. However, sensing temperature is not the only factor amongst the cutaneous sensations to contribute to thermoregulatory responses in humans. Sensing skin wetness (i.e. hygrosensation) is also critical both for behavioural and autonomic adaptations. Altho...
Article
Full-text available
Although the ability to detect humidity (i.e. hygrosensation) represents an important sensory attribute in many animal species (including humans), the neurophysiological and molecular bases of such sensory ability remain largely unknown in many animals. Recently, Russell and colleagues (Russell J, Vidal-Gadea AG, Makay A, Lanam C, Pierce-Shimomura...
Article
Full-text available
Sensing skin wetness is linked to inputs arising from cutaneous cold-sensitive afferents. As thermosensitivity to cold varies significantly across the torso, we investigated whether similar regional differences in wetness perception exist. Also, we investigated the regional differences in thermal pleasantness and whether these sensory patterns are...
Article
Full-text available
Conclusions: Posturographic tests can be used to assess and confirm the body's imbalance in subjects with whiplash injury. Further studies with larger cohorts are necessary to confirm this pilot study. Objectives: To verify through a posturographic exam the qualitative and quantitative alterations of postural stability in subjects with previous...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a single bout of whole-body vibration (WBV) on running gait. The running kinematic of sixteen male marathon runners was assessed on a treadmill at iso-efficiency speed after 10 min of WBV and SHAM (i.e. no WBV) conditions. A high-speed camera (210 Hz) was used for the video analysis a...
Article
Background/purposeIn the absence of humidity receptors in human skin, the perception of skin wetness is considered a somatosensory experience resulting from the integration of temperature (particularly cold) and mechanical inputs. However, limited data are available on the role of the temperature sense. Methods Wet and dry stimuli at 4°C and 8°C ab...
Article
The central integration of thermal (i.e. cold) and mechanical (i.e. pressure) sensory afferents is suggested as to underpin the perception of skin wetness. However, the role of temperature and mechanical inputs, and their interaction, is still unclear. Also, it is unknown whether this intra-sensory interaction changes according to the activity perf...
Article
Full-text available
It is widely recognised that the 1 RM bench press test is the most valid in evaluating the upper body maximal strength in both athletes and sedentary individuals. Various approaches are used for its evaluation, both through prediction equations or practical attempts. The aim of this study was to assess a new method to perform the bench press test c...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of an increasing number of training hours of specific high-intensity karate training on postural sway in preadolescent karate athletes. Seventy-four karatekas were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups: Karate Group (KG=37): age 10.29±1.68 yrs; or Control Group (CG= 37): age 10.06±1.77 yrs. The KG pe...
Article
Full-text available
Cold sensations are suggested as the primary inducer of the perception of skin wetness. However, limited data are available on the effects of skin cooling. Hence, we investigated the role of peripheral cold afferents in the perception of wetness. Six cold-dry stimuli (producing skin cooling rates in a range of 0.02 to 0.41°C/s) were applied on the...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this study was to verify whether there is a positive correlation between family history to type 2 diabetes mellitus and body mass and composition, and alterations in blood basal glycaemia levels in sedentary male and female. Anthropometric variables, blood parameters, body composition and body surface area were evaluated on 183 male and...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this study was to verify whether there is a positive correlation between family history to type 2 diabetes mellitus and body mass and composition, and alterations in blood basal glycaemia levels in sedentary male and female. Anthropometric variables, blood parameters, body composition and body surface area were evaluated on 183 male and...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Aim: The purpose was to investigate the relationship between Heart Rate Variability (HRV) and performance in players of a basketball team during playoffs. HRV has become the conventionally accepted term to describe variations of both instantaneous heart rate and R-R intervals (Task Force, 1996). The cardiovascular system is mostly controlled by aut...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Performing complex motor skills, such as the ones performed by karate athletes, requires a great sense of balance.Because the posturo-kinetic performance seems to be improved by sport practice, especially by sports involving alot of posturokinetic activities, the aim of this review was to critically analyse the scientific literature in...
Article
Full-text available
Whole Body Vibration training is studied and used in different areas, related to sport performance and rehabilitation. However, few studies have investigated the effects of Vibration (Vib) exposure on aerobic performance through the application of this concept to cycling exercise. A specifically designed vibrat-ing cycloergometer, the powerBIKE TM...