David Walker-Sünderhauf

David Walker-Sünderhauf
University of Exeter | UoE · Medical School

Master by Research of Biological Sciences

About

8
Publications
1,225
Reads
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110
Citations
Introduction
David Walker-Sünderhauf currently works at the University of Exeter Medical School and researches antibiotic resistance, and how to eliminate it. He is funded by the GW4 MRC DTP scheme.
Additional affiliations
October 2017 - June 2021
University of Exeter
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • I am researching antibiotic resistance, and how we might remove antibiotic resistance genes using CRISPR as a biotechnology. For my PhD, I am being supervised by Dr Will Gaze and Dr Stineke van Houte.
September 2016 - September 2017
University of Exeter
Position
  • Master's Student
Description
  • During my MRes degree, I worked on the interplay of Restriction-Modification and CRISPR-Cas under the supervision of Dr Edze Westra.
Education
September 2012 - June 2016
University of Aberdeen
Field of study
  • Immunology

Publications

Publications (8)
Preprint
Plasmids are key disseminators of antimicrobial resistance genes and virulence factors, and it is therefore critical to predict and reduce plasmid spread within microbial communities. The cost of plasmid carriage is a key metric that can be used to predict plasmids’ ecological fate, and it is unclear whether plasmid costs are affected by growth par...
Article
Full-text available
Diversity in host resistance often associates with reduced pathogen spread. This may result from ecological and evolutionary processes, likely with feedback between them. Theory and experiments on bacteria‐phage interactions have shown that genetic diversity of the bacterial adaptive immune system can limit phage evolution to overcome resistance. U...
Preprint
Full-text available
Diversity in host resistance often associates with reduced pathogen spread. This may result from ecological and evolutionary processes, likely with feedback between them. Theory and experiments on bacteria-phage interactions have shown that genetic diversity of the bacterial adaptive immune system can limit phage evolution to overcome resistance. U...
Article
Species from all five kingdoms of life have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to generate diversity in genes that are involved in host–pathogen interactions, conferring reduced levels of parasitism to both individuals and populations. Here, we highlight unifying concepts that underpin these evolutionarily unrelated diversity-generating mechanisms (D...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
I am investigating the removal of antimicrobial resistance genes from bacterial communities using biotechnology, specifically Cas9. The aims are to optimise delivery and effectivity for this method for a broad range of bacterial species, and address any issues such as resistance arising.