David Voegtlin

David Voegtlin
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign | UIUC · Illinois Natural History Survey

PhD

About

96
Publications
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Publications

Publications (96)
Article
Global temperatures are generally increasing, and this is leading to a well‐documented advancement and extension of seasonal activity of many pest insects. Effects of changing precipitation have received less attention, but might be complex because rain and snow are increasing in some places but decreasing in others. This raises the possibility tha...
Article
Many animals change feeding habits as they progress through life stages, exploiting resources that vary in space and time. However, complex life histories may bring new risks if rapid environmental change disrupts the timing of these switches. Here, we use abundance times series for a diverse group of herbivorous insects, aphids, to search for trai...
Article
Full-text available
The initiation of the soybean aphid suction trap network (STN) in 2001 marked the beginning of a rich and fruitful collaborative effort that has produced a wealth of data about the soybean aphid, other insect species, and other organisms that make up the aerobiological “soup.” Collaboration among researchers, extension specialists, and agricultural...
Article
Melanaphis sacchari (Zehntner) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), the sugarcane aphid, is an invasive species in the United States. This species is a threat to crops of economic importance including sorghum and sugar cane. Therefore, monitoring dispersal of this pest is necessary to document its geographic expansion. Based on trap catches obtained from the Mi...
Article
Full-text available
Morphological and cytochrome oxidase 1 (Cox1) data show that Aphis floridanae Tissot (Hemiptera: Aphididae) is not synonymous with A. nasturtii Kaltenbach. Instead, A. floridanae matches the morphological characters of A. impatientis Thomas. Additionally, the range of cytochrome oxidase 1 (Cox1) pair-wise distance of the multiple collections of A....
Article
Thrips-infesting soybeans were considered of minor economic importance, but recent evidence of their ability to transmit a newly identified soybean virus, Soybean vein necrosis virus (SVNV), has raised their profile as pests. Season-long surveys were conducted using suction traps to determine the effects of temperature and precipitation on the spat...
Article
Full-text available
Soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) is a pest of soybean in the northern Midwest whose migratory patterns have been difficult to quantify. Improved knowledge of soybean aphid overwintering sites could facilitate the development of control efforts with exponential impacts on aphid densities on a regional scale. In this preliminary study, we exp...
Article
Aphis elena Lagos-Kutz and Voegtlin, sp. nov. (Hemiptera: Aphididae), is described from specimens col- lected in Illinois, USA, on the North American native plant, Pycnanthemum virginianum (L.) T. Dur. & B.D. Jacks. ex B.L. Rob. & Fernald (Family: Lamiaceae). Both apterous and alate viviparae are described and illustrated, and a dichotomous key is...
Article
Full-text available
In North America, there is a morphologically defined group of Aphis species that use Cornus spp. as primary host plants and also are associated with plants in the family Apiaceae. We refer to them collectively as the Aphis asclepiadis species group and attempt to elucidate the taxonomic status of its members using sequences of mitochondrial cytochr...
Data
Table S2. Morphological characters useful to discriminate Aphid gossypii, Aphid monardae, Aphid oestlundi and Aphid sedi.
Article
Full-text available
The cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii, is one of the most biologically diverse species of aphids; a polyphagous species in a family where most are host specialists. It is economically important and belongs to a group of closely related species that has challenged aphid taxonomy. The research presented here seeks to clarify the taxonomic relationships an...
Article
The soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae), is one of the most destructive insect pests on soybeans in the United States. One method for managing this pest is through host plant resistance. Since its arrival in 2000, four aphid biotypes have been identified that are able to overcome soybean aphid resistance (Rag) genes. A so...
Article
Soybean aphid is a severe invasive pest of soybeans in North America. From 2005 onward, a network of 47 suction traps in North America, each approximately 7 m in height, has monitored aerial populations of this species.Suction trap captures of alate viviparous Aphis glycines in summer, and gynoparae and males in the autumn, were subjected to negati...
Article
Full-text available
A phylogeny of the genus Aphis Linnaeus, 1758 was built primarily from specimens collected in the Midwest of the USA. A data matrix was constructed with 68 species and 41 morphological characters with respective character states of alate and apterous viviparous females. Dendrogram topologies of analyses performed using UPGMA (Unweighted Pair Group...
Article
Full-text available
Aphis mizzou, n. sp. is described from specimens collected in Missouri, USA, on Hypericum kalmianum (Clusiaceae). Both apterous and alate viviparae are described and illustrated and a key is provided to apterae of the six species of Aphis that feed on Hypericum. Neighbor-joining analysis of cytochrome oxidase (COI) and nuclear elongation factor (EF...
Article
Full-text available
The soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae), is an economically important pest of soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merrill, in the United States. Phenological information of A. glycines is limited; specifically, little is known about factors guiding migrating aphids and potential impacts of long distance flights on local population...
Conference Paper
Pumpkins are susceptible to infection by four aphid-vectored viruses, but it is yet unknown which species may be primarily responsible for inoculating pumpkins with these viruses in the Midwest. To survey the prevalence of potential vector species throughout the growing season, aphid alates were monitored in 14 commercial pumpkin fields in Indiana....
Article
The soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae), is a pest of soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr. (Fabaceae), from eastern Asia that was first reported in North America in 2000. The influence of temperature on plasticity of life history and morphological traits of the soybean aphid has not been tested despite observable differences i...
Conference Paper
Protaphis used to be classified as a subgenus of Aphis. It was recently elevated to genus based on morphological characters. However, the newly subgenus Pseudoprotaphis of Aphis contains morphological characters, which overlap with those that belong to Protaphis. Currently, the North American species: A. caliginosa, A. debilicornis, A. lugentis and...
Article
Full-text available
Shortly after its arrival, the soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae), became established as the most important insect pest of soybean, Glycine max L. (Merr.), in the northern part of the North American soybean production region. Soybean resistance is an environmentally sustainable method to manage the pest and new soybean a...
Conference Paper
The soybean aphid Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae) is an economically important pest in soybean Glycine max (L.) Merr. in the U.S. Biological information of A. glycines is limited and pest outbreaks persist in soybean throughout the Midwest. For example, little is known about factors guiding migrating aphids and potential impacts of...
Conference Paper
Aphis, is one of the largest genera in the family Aphididae. The accurate identification of these species is of crucial importance because this genus contains many species that are pests of agriculturally important crops. Aphis species are very difficult to discriminate using only morphological characters. Members of this genus have a close associa...
Conference Paper
Soybean aphid is a severe pest of soybean in the Midwestern and Great Lakes regions of North America. Aphids are highly mobile and isolated infestations may spread to both adjacent and distant regions over the course of a growing season. Since 2005, the North Central IPM Center, in collaboration with the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Ru...
Article
Full-text available
The aphid Aphis glycines Matsumura, which was first observed in North America in 2000, is a pest of soybean, Glycine max L., in the United States and southern Canada. This study focused on the distribution and sampling of this aphid at two spatial scales: field and township. We sampled 14 soybean fields in each of two townships in Kendall and Champ...
Article
Full-text available
Examination of DNA sequences of the 5' end of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene of Aulacorthum solani (Kaltenbach) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) reveals little variation between samples from broad geographic provenances. The apparent genetic similarity despite A. solani's morphological and biological differences contrasts with the species comple...
Article
Full-text available
Aphis echinaceae, n. sp. is described from specimens collected in Douglas County, Minnesota, on Echinacea angustifolia (DC.). The aphid is illustrated with biometric data for alate and apterous vivipara. Its short cauda and sip-hunculi, and presence of secondary sensoria on antennal segments III, IV, and V in both morphs makes this Aphis morphologi...
Article
We tested host plant suitability of 10 taxa in the Rhamnaceae for successful preoverwintering development of soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Homoptera: Aphididae). In the laboratory, we offered each gynopara and ovipara a single member of each putative host plant and measured survivorship and fecundity. Rhamnus cathartica L. and Rhamnus al...
Article
Full-text available
Soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura, a native of eastern Asia, was Þrst discovered in North America in July 2000 in Wisconsin and subsequently in a total of 10 North Central U.S. states by September 2000. Currently, soybean aphid has spread to 20 U.S. states and three Canadian provinces, putting 60 million acres of soybean at risk to crop injur...
Article
Full-text available
Aphis glycines Matsumura shares its hosts with two other aphid species, Aphis nasturtii Kaltenbach and Aphis gossypii Glover. Tables of characters and photographs are provided to assist in the separation of these three species. A photographic plate showing a gynopara, male, ovipara, and late summer apterous vivipara of A. glycines is included.
Article
Eleven species from the family Rhamnaceae, including both species exotic and native to North America, were tested for their acceptability to the fall migrants of the soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura. Two species, Rhamnus cathartica L. and Rhamnus alnifolia L’Héritier were accepted and had overwintering eggs deposited on them. Eggs survived t...
Article
Full-text available
Species and cultivars of the genus Rhamnus and related genera in the Rhamnaceae were tested for their suitability as overwintering hosts of the soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae). The tests were carried out in outdoor cages during the fall through spring of 2002–2003 and 2003–2004. Response of the aphid to the hosts vari...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Aphis, one of the largest genera in the family Aphididae, contains many species that are pests of agriculturally important crops and research needs require accurate identification. No comprehensive key to Aphis exists and species identification is difficult. Members of this genus have a close association with a wide diversity of plants and the avai...
Article
Purple loosestrife is a European perennial plant that was introduced into the New World almost two centuries ago. It is found from coast to coast in North America and is considered a serious weed of wetlands. This is the story of getting the public involved in a team approach that includes schools, landowners and managers, who collect, rear and red...
Chapter
This book contains 45 chapters divided into four sections, i.e. classical biocontrol programmes, inundative (or augmentative) biocontrol programmes (using nematodes, bacteria, fungi and viruses), conservation biocontrol programmes and networking in biocontrol. It describes the personal experiences of scientists from the initial search for suitable...
Article
Full-text available
Species and cultivars of the genus Bhamnus and related genera in the Rhamnaceae were tested for their suitability as overwintering hosts of the soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae). The tests were carried out in outdoor cages during the fall through spring of 2002-2003 and 2003-2004. Response of the aphid to the hosts vari...
Article
From 2001 to 2004, 252 fifty-plant samples were collected from commercial soybean, Glycine max L., fields in three townships (93-km2 area) in Illinois. Townships were sampled every 3 wk from late June or early July when aphids (Aphis glycines Matsumura) first invaded the townships to early August. We used linear regression of 18 mean township field...
Article
Full-text available
Basic to our understanding of any animal and its habitat requirements is knowing what it eats. Reported here are observations of feeding by 27 species of aphids encountered in Wisconsin over 1992-2002.
Article
Aphelinus albipodus Hayat and Fatima is a potential biological control agent of the soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura, which is a newly introduced soybean pest in the United States. We compared the reproductive compatibility and molecular genetic variation between two geographic strains of A. albipodus. One strain was collected from soybean a...
Article
Full-text available
The Cinara species (Hemiptera: Aphididae: Lachninae) found on Pinus edulis Engelm. and P. monophylla Torr. & Frém. are revised and now include eight species. Included are redescriptions of the viviparous apterae and alatae of C. atra (Gillette & Palmer), C. caliente Hottes, C. edulis (Wilson), C. puerca Hottes, C. tanneri (Knowlton), C. terminalis...
Article
Full-text available
Cinara edulis (Wilson), C. terminais (Gillette and Palmer), and C. wahtolca Hottes were all larger when feeding on Pinus monophylla Torr. & Frem. than when feeding on P. edulis Engelm. Almost all nonsetal morphometric characters were longer in aphids on the former of these pinyon pines. Although mouthpart characters also followed this pattern of si...
Article
Full-text available
Parasite-host cospeciation has received much attention as an important mechanism in the diversification of phytophagous insects. However, studies have shown that for certain taxa, it is not host fidelity but host-switching that plays the critical role in speciation. Cinara are aphids (Insecta: Hemiptera: Aphididae: Lachninae) that feed exclusively...
Article
Soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura, a native of eastern Asia, was first discovered in North America in July 2000 in Wisconsin and subsequently in a total of 10 North Central U.S. states by September 2000. Currently, soybean aphid has spread to 20 U.S. states and three Canadian provinces, putting >60 million acres of soybean at risk to crop inj...
Article
Eleven species from the family Rhamnaceae, including both species exotic and native to North America, were tested for their acceptability to the fall migrants of the soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura. Two species, Rhamnus cathartica L. and Rhamnus alnifolia L'Héritier were accepted and had overwintering eggs deposited on them. Eggs survived t...
Article
Full-text available
This guide is a compilation of limited morphological and biological information on the winged morphs of 60 species of aphids that have been collected in Costa Rica. It should not be viewed as a definitive taxonomic treatise on the aphids of Costa Rica, rather it is a tool that can be used to assist in research on the biology, host plant relationshi...
Article
Understanding the phenology of biological control agents is critical for developing effective rearing methods. In the case of Galerucella calmariensis L, a biological control agent introduced against purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria), the presence of an obligatory diapause affects successful rearing. G. calmariensis individuals were reared fro...
Article
Full-text available
Schizaphis minuta (van der Goot) (Fig. 1) was found for the first time in the Western Hemisphere in suction trap samples in Florida. The first specimen was collected in a trap at Quincy (Gadsden County) for the period 16 - 23 November 1998. The record subsequently was verified by collections on several species of Cyperus in the Ft. Pierce area. The...
Article
Full-text available
Paired suction traps were used to study the habitat choice of migrating aphids in adjacent crop and natural habitats in east central Illinois. Traps were placed in a row-crop field and a restored prairie for 4 yr at one site, and a row-crop field and a wooded plot for 3 yr at another. Row crops were corn or soybean, rotated annually. We did not wis...
Article
Over 5,000 individual plants representing approximately 55 species from an area in southern Illinois where Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) has been a major problem in pepper (Capsicum annuum) were tested for the presence of CMV by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Representative ELISA-positive samples were checked by western blot tests to conf...
Article
This paper describes a technique for creating customized, thick (≃ 1 mm) slide labels, and fastening them permanently to slides so they can be stored vertically by stacking or horizontally like cards in a file without putting pressure on the coverslip. After 20 years, thick labels created by this technique have shown no sign of degradation; labels...
Article
Outbreaks of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) disease, caused by an aphid-transmitted pathogen, greatly reduced yields of bell pepper in southern Illinois in the mid-1990s. To provide the basis for further studies of the roles of individual aphid species in virus transmission, we surveyed aphid flights in and around pepper fields in 1996 and 1997 by usi...
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Full-text available
In recent decades, aphids identified as Cinara cupressi (Buckton) have seriously damaged commercial and ornamental plantings and native stands of Cupressus, Juniperus, Widdringtonia and other Cupressaceae in Africa, Italy, Jordan, Yemen, Mauritius and Colombia. Aphids currently identified as Cinara cupressiappear to belong to a species complex. Thi...
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issued September 1999 Report issued on: September 1999 INHS Technical Report prepared for Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and United States Fish and Wildlife Service
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The aphid Uroleucon sonchi contains a prokaryotic endosymbiont (Buchnera) with plasmids having trpEG as well as remnants of trpE pseudogenes. In this respect it resembles Buchnera from the aphid Diuraphis noxia. Phylogenetic trees based on trpE (plasmid gene) and trpB (chromosomal genes) from eight species of aphids are congruent, indicating a lack...
Article
Full-text available
The bacterial endosymbionts (Buchnera) from the aphids Rhopalosiphum padi, R. maidis, Schizaphis graminum, and Acyrthosiphon pisum contain the genes for anthranilate synthase (trpEG) on plasmids made up of one or more 3.6-kb units. Anthranilate synthase is the first as well as the rate-limiting enzyme in the tryptophan biosynthetic pathway. The amp...
Article
Full-text available
The bacterial endosymbionts (Buchnera) from the aphidsRhopalosiphum padi, R. maidis, Schizaphis graminum, andAcyrthosiphon pisum contain the genes for anthranilate synthase (trpEG) on plasmids made up of one or more 3.6-kb units. Anthranilate synthase is the first as well as the rate-limiting enzyme in the tryptophan biosynthetic pathway. The ampli...
Article
The host-altemating life cycle of Myzus lythri, an aphid of European origin that feeds on purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria), is detailed. The complex life cycle and low availability of primary host plants are hypothesized as limiting early-season development of aphid populations on purple loosestrife.Experiments were undertaken in 1993 to dete...