David E. Uribe R.

David E. Uribe R.
University of Melbourne | MSD · School of BioSciences

MSc

About

11
Publications
9,943
Reads
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97
Citations
Citations since 2017
9 Research Items
97 Citations
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Introduction
I'm a Chilean ecologist currently based at the Quantitative and Applied Ecology Group, The University of Melbourne, Australia. My PhD (2017-2021) is being supervised by Prof. Brendan Wintle and Dr. Gurutzeta Guillera-Arroita. My research interests are as wide as global change biology, but at the moment focused on conservation biogeography. I try to design it to support conservation practice, so it is mostly applied and usually incorporates explicit recommendations to improve environmental management. My current research is focused on the effects of anthropogenic climate change, land use change, biological invasions and emerging diseases on biodiversity distribution and persistence.
Additional affiliations
August 2017 - August 2021
University of Melbourne
Position
  • PhD Student
March 2013 - January 2016
University of Chile
Position
  • Master's Student
April 2011 - January 2017
Centro de Estudio de Humedales
Position
  • Research Associate

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
Full-text available
Ecological models used to forecast range change (range change models; RCM) have recently diversified to account for a greater number of ecological and observational processes in pursuit of more accurate and realistic predictions. Theory suggests that process-explicit RCMs should generate more robust forecasts, particularly under novel environmental...
Article
Full-text available
Darwin's frogs Rhinoderma darwinii and Rhinoderma rufum are the only known species of amphibians in which males brood their offspring in their vocal sacs. We propose these frogs as flagship species for the conservation of the Austral temperate forests of Chile and Argentina. This recommendation forms part of the vision of the Binational Conservatio...
Article
Full-text available
Amphibians are hosts for a wide variety of micro- and macro-parasites. Chigger mites from the Hannemania genus are known to infect a wide variety of amphibian species across the Americas. In Chile, three species (H. pattoni, H. gonzaleacunae and H. ortizi) have been described infecting native anurans; however, neither impacts nor the microscopic le...
Article
Full-text available
Emerging fungal diseases represent a threat to food security, animal and human health worldwide. Amphibian chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), has been associated with catastrophic and well-documented amphibian population declines and extinctions. For the first time, Bd was cultured from native and non-native...
Chapter
The evidence shows that the biological and social systems from the Puna ecoregions are highly vulnerable to climate change. However, there is poor understanding about the likely effects of future climate change on these ecosystems at the regional scale, mainly because of the lack of systematic and standardized monitoring. In this context, the need...
Article
Full-text available
Biological and social systems from the Puna ecoregions are considered one of the most vulnerable to climate change. However there is poor understanding about the way that these systems would be impacted by future climatic change on a regional scale. In this context, the need of a multidisciplinary approach in the climate change effects assessment a...
Article
Full-text available
The decline of wildlife populations due to emerging infectious disease often shows a common pattern: the parasite invades a naive host population, producing epidemic disease and a population decline, sometimes with extirpation. Some susceptible host populations can survive the epidemic phase and persist with endemic parasitic infection. Understandi...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change is a major threat to biodiversity; the development of models that reliably predict its effects on species distributions is a priority for conservation biogeography. Two of the main issues for accurate temporal predictions from Species Distribution Models (SDM) are model extrapolation and unrealistic dispersal scenarios. We assessed t...
Raw Data
These files were generated as part of the article ”Dispersal and extrapolation on the accuracy of temporal predictions from distribution models for the Darwin’s frog” (Uribe-Rivera et al. 2017; accepted in Ecological Applications) We used point data of meteorological stations between 34°-48°S and 70°-75°W, to generate new climatic surfaces for thre...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Anthropogenic climate change is a major threat to biodiversity, and the development of models that reliably predict their effects on species distributions is a priority to conservation biogeography. Common issues to temporal predictability of Species Distribution Models (SDM) are model extrapolation and realistic incorporation of dispersal capaciti...

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
I'm looking for community-level datasets older than 20 years, at the landscape spatial-scale (i.e. multiple survey points in space), for any taxa or region.
If you know any dataset with these characteristics, please list it in the answers (hopefully with a related reference or website).
Thank a lot for your help,
All the best for 2018!
Cheers,
David.-
Question
I'm trying to fit a dispersal kernel using CMR data from small mammals, to parameterize a Cellular Automaton (CA) designed to model range shifts driven by environmental change. This CA have annual steps, so I need a dispersal kernel standarized to 1 year dispersal events. Does anybody knows how to fit such dispersal kernel using data of dispersal events experienced in just a couple days (no more than one month)? 
if someone can share a R script, it would be great,
Thank you so much!

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