David Rozen-Rechels

David Rozen-Rechels
Sorbonne Université | UPMC · Institut d'Écologie et des Sciences de l'Environnement de Paris (iEES Paris) - UMR 7618

Doctor of Philosophy
Maître de Conférences

About

23
Publications
6,086
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
220
Citations
Introduction
I currently work at the Evolutionary Ecology, Institute of Ecology and Environmental Sciences in Paris, France. My research focuses on behavioral ecology and more precisely on the environmental constraints shaping space use behaviors in the landscape. Actually, I am mainly working on understanding how animals adjust their behavior to changes in the thermal and hydric conditions of their environment. The behaviors I am interested in range from exploration rate at short time scale measured in experimental set-up to landscape use, habitat selection and movements in natural populations. My study species are actually the common lizard (Zootoca vivipara) and the African savanna elephant (Loxodonta africana).
Additional affiliations
September 2019 - present
La Rochelle Université
Position
  • Lecturer
September 2016 - August 2019
Institute of Ecology and Environmental Sciences IEES-Paris
Position
  • PhD Student
September 2016 - present
Sorbonne Université
Position
  • CME - Teaching assistant

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Full-text available
Mercury (Hg) is a toxic trace element widely distributed in the environment, which particularly accumulates in top predators, including seabirds. Among seabirds, large gulls (Larus sp) are generalist feeders, foraging in both terrestrial and marine habitats, making them relevant bioindicators of local coastal Hg contamination. In the present study,...
Article
Full-text available
Background A challenge faced by animals living in groups with stable long-term membership is to effectively coordinate their actions and maintain cohesion. However, as seasonal conditions alter the distribution of resources across a landscape, they can change the priority of group members and require groups to adapt and respond collectively across...
Article
1. In the past decades, nocturnal temperatures have been playing a disproportionate role in the global warming of the planet. Yet, they remain a neglected factor in studies assessing the impact of global warming on natural populations. 2. Here, we question whether an intense augmentation of nocturnal temperatures is beneficial or deleterious to ect...
Article
Full-text available
Thermoregulation is critical for ectotherms as it allows them to maintain their body temperature close to an optimum for ecological performance. Thermoregulation includes a range of behaviors that aim at regulating body temperature within a range centered around the thermal preference. Thermal preference is typically measured in a thermal gradient...
Article
In arid and semiarid environments, water is a key resource that is limited in availability. During the dry season, perennial water sources such as water pans often are far apart and shape the daily movement routines of large herbivores. In hot environments, endotherms face a lethal risk of overheating that can be buffered by evaporative cooling. Be...
Article
Behavioral thermoregulation is an efficient mechanism to buffer the physiological effects of climate change. Thermal ecology studies have traditionally tested how thermal constraints shape thermoregulatory behaviors without accounting for the potential major effects of landscape structure and water availability. Thus, we lack a general understandin...
Article
Full-text available
Regulation of body temperature is crucial for optimizing physiological performance in ectotherms but imposes constraints in time and energy. Time and energy spent thermoregulating can be reduced through behavioral (e.g., basking adjustments) or biophysical (e.g., heating rate physiology) means. In a heterogeneous environment, we expect thermoregula...
Article
Full-text available
Mechanistic models of terrestrial ectotherms predict that climate warming will induce activity restriction due to heat stress and loss of shade, leading to the extinction of numerous populations. Such models rely on the assumption that activity patterns are dictated by simple temperature thresholds independent of changes in water availability. Howe...
Article
Full-text available
Animals use a variety of strategies to avoid acute dehydration and death. Yet, how chronic exposure to sub-lethal dehydration may entail physiological and fitness costs remains elusive. In this study, we experimentally tested if water restriction causes increased oxidative stress (OS) and telomere length (TL) shortening, two well-described mediator...
Article
Chronic changes in climate conditions may select for acclimation responses in terrestrial animals living in fluctuating environments, and beneficial acclimation responses may be key to the resilience of these species to global changes. Despite evidence that climate warming induces changes in water availability, acclimation responses to water restri...
Article
Full-text available
Behavioral fight responses to desiccation risk are important to predict the vulnerability of terrestrial animals to climate change and yet, they have received little attention so far. In terrestrial ectotherms, behavioral regulation of the water balance (i.e. hydroregulation) is likely to be plastic and may tradeoff with thermoregulation behavior b...
Article
Full-text available
Reproduction involves considerable reorganization in an organism's physiology that incurs potential toxicity for cells (e.g., oxidative stress) and decrease in fitness. This framework has been the cornerstone of the so‐called ‘oxidative cost of reproduction’, a theory that remains controversial and relatively overlooked in non‐model ectotherms. Her...
Thesis
Actual climate changes drive modifications of the thermal and water landscapes where live organisms. Thermoregulation in ectotherm species mostly rely on behavioral adjustments. These adjustments buffer the negative effects of these environmental changes on the physiology and the performances of the individuals. However, too few studies focused on...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract The regulation of body temperature (thermoregulation) and of water balance (defined here as hydroregulation) are key processes underlying ecological and evolutionary responses to climate fluctuations in wild animal populations. In terrestrial (or semiterrestrial) ectotherms, thermoregulation and hydroregulation closely interact and combine...
Article
Full-text available
The evolution of sex determination is complex and yet crucial in our understanding of population stability. In ectotherms, sex determination involves a variety of mechanisms including genetic determination (GSD), environment determination (ESD), but also interactions between the two via sex reversal. In this study, we investigated whether water dep...
Article
Full-text available
Behavioral plasticity induced by maternal effects is crucial in adjusting offspring phenotype to match the environment. In particular, changes in water availability during development may initiate a range of behavioral responses, such as natal dispersal, but the contribution of maternal effects from water stress in explaining behavioral variation h...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Habitat loss and fragmentation is one of the main drivers of defaunation, that is the loss of large mammals. Biological invasions could be drivers of such phenomenon. However, their impact on large herbivore communities has not been studied to our knowledge. We made use of a landscape-scale control programme of one of the world's worst invaders...
Article
Biological invasions have increased dramatically in the past centuries and are one of the greatest threats to biodiversity today. Chromolaena odorata, a herbaceous shrub from the Americas, is one of the most widespread and problematic invasive plant species in the tropics and sub-tropics. The plant is a serious problem in South Africa, where invasi...
Article
Full-text available
How is woody vegetation patchiness affected by rainfall, fire and large herbivore biomass? Can we predict woody patchiness and cover over large-scale environmental gradients? We quantified variation in local patchiness as the lacunarity of woody cover on satellite-derived images. Using Random Forest regression we analysed how both average woody cov...
Article
Full-text available
Many studies have been conducted about the information contained in the anatomy of the mammalian middle ear. Most of these only use a few specimens. Thus we aim to provide a quantitative analysis of the intraspecific and interspecific variations of the middle ear, focusing on the auditory bulla. For that purpose, we focused on the mustelids, as a q...
Article
Full-text available
Optimal foraging theory addresses one of the core challenges of ecology: predicting the distribution and abundance of species. Tests of hypotheses of optimal foraging, however, often focus on a single conceptual model rather than drawing upon the collective body of theory, precluding generalization. Here we demonstrate links between two established...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
In this project, we will use ecophysiology and behavioural ecology to enhance our understanding of thermo-hydroregulation strategies in terrestrial ectotherms. Focusing on squamate reptiles (lizards and snakes), we will combine mechanistic biophysical models, empirical studies of physiological and behavioural traits at the individual and population levels using two model species from two French Mountain ranges, climate niche simulations for these species, and comparative analyses across all squamate reptiles.
Project
Combining habitat selection, landscape ecology, movement ecology, statistical mechanistic models; from field working, to experiments and modelisation; I am interested in the way animals optimize their thermoregulation according to available micro-habitats. The crossed effects of temperature with different habitat variables like water is also studied. The final aim of these studies, combined with physiology, is to test mechanistic models according to behaviors and physiology and to predict future species distributions. My studied species are: the common lizard (Lacerta vivipara).